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In the Critique of Pure reason ( see: " Kant and the table of Nothing" at : https: users.ox.ac.uk › ~sfop0426 › nothing ), Kant distinguishes 4 forms of " nothingness", amongst which " ens imaginarium" (nothingness as " imaginary being" of " pure intuition without any object"). If one eliminates all the empirical content of perception, all " matter", all "...


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We assume nothing, as assumptions are intrinsically empty and have no value in and of themselves. To imagine "nothing", ie "give image", is a statement of relation as we only observe nothing through a relation of multiple parts. For example an empty cup, we only observe its emptiness because of its relation to a liquid. Thus we have a relationship between ...


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Yes, it is possible to have imagined nothingness, but the realization of having done so only happens once you are brought back to awareness. The first thing you will realize is that you are thinking again, which leads to the epiphany that for a moment you were truly not having any thoughts. In my experience of doing this it always led to an interesting side-...


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No. Absolute nothingness can be neither experienced nor imagined. As I wrote in my book The Illusion of Will, Self, and Time: William James's Reluctant Guide to Enlightenment Even blackouts (including dreamless sleep) cannot be confirmed to be other than black-ins, of which only the last moment of blackness, before “coming-to,” is remembered? What of ...


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