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7 votes

Is Sisyphus actually happy or is he content?

There is not room to quote the whole essay here, or even the whole last paragraph. They explain Camus' point pretty well. The last two sentences are: The struggle itself toward the heights is ...
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7 votes
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What is "the Nietzschean criterion" in Camus' "The Myth of Sisyphus"?

The allusion to the expression "the Nietzschean criterion" is, I think, merely internal to the present text (The Myth of Sisyphus). It is not something we the readers are supposed to know if ...
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6 votes
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What to know before reading The Myth of Sisyphus?

Try reading it and see! There’s probably not a really satisfying answer for the general case. It’s one of the great works of literature as well as philosophy, a cultural monument and apex and ...
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5 votes
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What does Albert Camus mean by two methods of thought, "of La Palisse and Don Quixote"?

La Palisse was a French nobleman who liked jokes based on truisms. When he died his comrades famously made a song about it, saying "if he wasn't dead he would still be alive". To Camus he ...
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4 votes

Why and how is Camus "against nihilism"?

Why is Absurdism against Nihilism? Absurdism, as presented by Camus in the Myth of Sisyphus, allows the individual to have belief systems. These belief systems are formed by consciously appropriating ...
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4 votes

Why should we care about anyone?

One of the weaknesses of the Western philosophical tradition - something that Existentialism and Absurdism tried to address — is that Western philosophy discounts psychology (broadly put). It ...
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3 votes

If life is absurd, is immortality desirable?

From a purely logical perspective, the question is not answerable. The desirability of immortality does not stand in any necessary connection with whether life is absurd or meaningful. ...
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3 votes

What is "the Nietzschean criterion" in Camus' "The Myth of Sisyphus"?

The question Camus is asking is whether life is worth living, which, he believes, is equivalent to the problem of suicide. For the equivalence, Camus establishes such auxiliary assumptions as living ...
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3 votes

Philosophical suicide

For existential philosophy, failing to grapple with the paradoxes of death (in that it explicitly limits our ability to perceive the world in its totality) and the Real (that, because our perception ...
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3 votes

Why does Camus consider an absurd life better than suicide?

You have to keep in mind that "rolling the rock" purposeless, was Sisyphus' punishment. If, instead, he rolls it over wheat, he will make flour, which could be used to feed people, thereby giving ...
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  • 1,720
3 votes

Was the European Left confined in a false dichotomy between capitalism and communism?

The dichotomy of the question (Communism vs. Capitalism) and the dichotomy actually mentioned in the quote are very different. The quote says Camus saw oppression in the Soviet Union (and the Soviet ...
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  • 51
3 votes

What does this line from "A Happy Death" by Camus mean?

In general, A Happy Death (1936-38), as well as the following Camus' novel : The Stranger (1942), which share with the previous one the title character : Mersault, revolves around the attempt to make ...
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3 votes

Why should we care about anyone?

Sartre proposes that caring is a reality of human psychology from which we cannot escape (along with psychoanalysis and a raft of feminists, but he is the biggest-name philosopher who put it clearly). ...
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3 votes

What are the "crimes of passion and crimes of logic"?

Short Answer A thousand years ago, a person was readily culpable or not for their choices. Today, culpability is not so clear since we participate in highly complex societies built on highly complex ...
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  • 9,883
3 votes

Is Absurdism a form of hedonism?

Absurdism is a philosophy where life has no meaning, and the greatest example of it is Camus' novel "The Stranger". It's important to note that this isn't nihilistic or pessimistic. In fact, ...
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  • 266
3 votes

How may absurdism be relevant in our current world and recent events, such as the pandemic?

One of Camus' most famous works is a novel called The Plague, which is about a disease outbreak. I would suggest taking a look into that, as there are plenty of straightforward comparisons that can be ...
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  • 31
2 votes

Why and how is Camus "against nihilism"?

This isn't really an answer; but an extended comment. I'd be curious as to whether Camus was responding to the myth of the Eternal return of Nietzsche; Sisphus's task after all is essentially a ...
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2 votes
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What did Camus mean when he wrote "All thoughts are anthropomorphic"?

We are all men. All our thoughts are anthropomorphic. If we try to imagine thoughts in animals, we will imagine them to have anthropomorphic thoughts. It is beyond our realm to understand how an ...
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2 votes

Is existentialism the "practical" nihilism?

So is existentialism basically "pratical" nihilism? No, they are not the same. Existentialism is not as narrow as it sounds, but always seems to have two major tenets --the first mentioned in the ...
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  • 121
2 votes

Is atheism a requirement for a consistent existentialist philosophy?

For Kierkegaard, and by extension Christian existentialists in general, it is precisely the primacy of the personal relationship with God that releases the individual from all other bindings of ...
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2 votes
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How should one interpret Camus' quote about the "vanity of experience"?

This is an example of what can be called associative narration, that is common in the texts of continental tradition in philosophy to which Camus belongs. Its aim is to foster understanding rather ...
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  • 40.7k
2 votes

If life is absurd, is immortality desirable?

If life is absurd, immortality might be a continuation of the absurdity - and worse, because life ends but immorality goes on for ever. An eternity of absurdity! What a prospect. However, if ...
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  • 34.6k
2 votes

Is Sisyphus actually happy or is he content?

The question is a tough one because it is very hard to know what Camus had in his mind while writing that. Many interpretations are possible. However, there is one way to look into it. Camus starts ...
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2 votes

How can Camus be correct that 'il peut y avoir des responsables, il n'y a pas de coupable'?

One way of looking at guilt is to acknowledge that the experience of moral guilt is real, but that it does not mean anything. That is, the human moral faculty is not reliable although it is tempting ...
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  • 18.9k
2 votes

If life is absurd, is immortality desirable?

From SEP, Camus asserts what he regards as self-evident facts: that we must die and there is nothing beyond this life. Without mentioning it, Camus draws a conclusion from these facts, namely that ...
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  • 144
2 votes

Albert Camus's thoughts on Science in the "Myth of Sisyphus"

(I don't have formal training in philosophy; I'm a physicist who really likes The Myth of Sisyphus; other commenters on this forum will no doubt give you a better placement of this sentiment in ...
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  • 121
2 votes

Did Camus ever really write "Should I kill myself or have a cup of coffee"?

The quote is not Camus'. But, apparently, misquoting Camus, or even fabricating quotes is something of an enterprise. Gaetani even has papaer on it The noble art of misquoting Camus. They include "I ...
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  • 40.7k

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