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17

Perhaps a better question to ask is the inverse: whether traditional religion is compatible with existential philosophy; Kierkegaard's existential beliefs certainly affected his view of the role of religion, to the point that his theology was extremely controversial among his contemporaries. Existentialism doesn't necessarily require the outright rejection ...


12

Political words tend to change the meaning, but the original meaning of communism meant common ownership of all property. As such it was during all of the 19th century in practice equivalent to socialism and could be used more or less interchangeably. Although the early usage of the word "Capitalism" meant having stock exchanges and investors, since the ...


7

God is negotiable under existential tenets, as is any other exigency. Just as neither the weather in Brazil nor the affairs of Peter Pan bear much impact on a day to day accounting of life for me, neither does god; it is not to say the same for others' accounting.


7

An existentialist philosophy is nothing more than a philosophy who's subject is human life and the human experience. The substance and particulars of existentialism cover a wide spectrum of beliefs and ideas.


7

Personally, I wouldn't think it means much. It isn't a thought that Camus saw fit to publish, and had he done so, I imagine he would have put it in a context that would have elaborated the nature of his thought. Writers (including Camus) use their Notebooks for a variety of purposes-- among them, to jot down thoughts that might form the kernel of future ...


7

Nihilism states that no matter what you do, it's meaningless. Actually, it's a great deal more complex than that. There are a large number of conceptions of nihilism (a few of which are listed here), and they all share one important attribute-- it is almost always a term attributed to someone else, to argue against. You'll be hard pressed to find someone ...


5

The allusion to the expression "the Nietzschean criterion" is, I think, merely internal to the present text (The Myth of Sisyphus). It is not something we the readers are supposed to know if we read this expression without having read the previous pages in The Myth of Sisyphus. And its understanding does not even require a previous familiarity with Nietzsche....


4

There is not room to quote the whole essay here, or even the whole last paragraph. They explain Camus' point pretty well. The last two sentences are: The struggle itself toward the heights is enough to fill a man's heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy. So, no, Sisyphus is struggling, not content. He is happy because his heart is full. What would ...


4

Much of the answer to this depends on what you mean by 'atheism.' As the opposite of 'theism,' that form of atheism is just as dogmatic as what it seems to reject. The existential project looks at the event in the present in all its contingencies, so our relationship to a deeper or 'divine' reality might well be part of that. This a/theism does not affirm ...


4

Try reading it and see! There’s probably not a really satisfying answer for the general case. It’s one of the great works of literature as well as philosophy, a cultural monument and apex and touchstone in its own right; and it is as open to you as it is for anyone for an immediate encounter. I would really suggest that in general don’t be worried about not ...


3

We can try and break it down to two states of being, each defined by the state of equilibrium in which it exists and is nurtured. The two states of equilibrium are war and peace, and it seems Camus is saying that a creative person (or anyone who is destined to excel at a certain aspect of life) is able to manifest their true creative self only where there ...


3

As Michael Dorfman has already suggested in his citation of Derrida- such shenanigans can be so much entrails and tea leaves- pick the interpretation that best matches your mark's probable fate. I like to read it by regarding the nexus of 'style' as a word in the thrownness of Dasein at the behest of das Mann. It is not inconceivable that like many ...


3

Why is Absurdism against Nihilism? Absurdism, as presented by Camus in the Myth of Sisyphus, allows the individual to have belief systems. These belief systems are formed by consciously appropriating elements of preexisting philosophies. Also by observing the consequences of actions, a moral code can be built. I've not as well read on Nihilism, but I think ...


3

The dichotomy of the question (Communism vs. Capitalism) and the dichotomy actually mentioned in the quote are very different. The quote says Camus saw oppression in the Soviet Union (and the Soviet system in general) as the "primary problem for the left" post-war. That is hardly the same thing as him feeling forced into a choice between Communism and ...


3

For existential philosophy, failing to grapple with the paradoxes of death (in that it explicitly limits our ability to perceive the world in its totality) and the Real (that, because our perception is limited, we are unable to find universal knowledge about the world) constitutes a harm to our ability to live to our fullest (in that we live thinking that ...


3

The question Camus is asking is whether life is worth living, which, he believes, is equivalent to the problem of suicide. For the equivalence, Camus establishes such auxiliary assumptions as living is absurd and man should act upon his belief. Camus says there are more than two immediate answers: Yes and No. A third possible answer, according to Camus, is, ...


3

In general, A Happy Death (1936-38), as well as the following Camus' novel : The Stranger (1942), which share with the previous one the title character : Mersault, revolves around the attempt to make sense of life, despite its absurdity (i.e. llack of sense, of meaning). The basic questions are : are money, love, success, the way to "give sense" to life ? ...


2

So is existentialism basically "pratical" nihilism? No, they are not the same. Existentialism is not as narrow as it sounds, but always seems to have two major tenets --the first mentioned in the other answer (but not elaborated)-- which is that the argument that consciousness is the ultimate undeniable proof of existence (Descartes), is rejected, (or ...


2

For Kierkegaard, and by extension Christian existentialists in general, it is precisely the primacy of the personal relationship with God that releases the individual from all other bindings of religion, law, custom, morals and tradition (while at the same time laying on the existential "yoke" of absolute direct obedience to God). Although this clearly ...


2

We are all men. All our thoughts are anthropomorphic. If we try to imagine thoughts in animals, we will imagine them to have anthropomorphic thoughts. It is beyond our realm to understand how an animal would actually think. We interpret the universe through our human mind and senses. We have no other choice. Charles Darwin, when asked if he believed in God, ...


2

You have to keep in mind that "rolling the rock" purposeless, was Sisyphus punishment. If instead, he rolls it over wheat, he will make flower, which could be used to feed people, thereby giving purpose/value to his efforts (life). Life is not a punishment, but rather an opportunity to help others and enjoy their company, to go through the different stages ...


2

This is an example of what can be called associative narration, that is common in the texts of continental tradition in philosophy to which Camus belongs. Its aim is to foster understanding rather than to pass information, to invoke what one has in mind in the reader, and to help them explore it for themselves. The text is often structured as a search for ...


2

If life is absurd, immortality might be a continuation of the absurdity - and worse, because life ends but immorality goes on for ever. An eternity of absurdity! What a prospect. However, if immortality provides an extension of our ability to 'focus on other things and personal human projects', then it looks attractive - unless the other things and projects ...


2

From a purely logical perspective, the question is not answerable. The desirability of immortality does not stand in any necessary connection with whether life is absurd or meaningful. Syllogistically, you are asking if A=B, does C=D follow? So what is necessary is to add some premises which link meaning or lack of it to desirability or undesirability of ...


2

One way of looking at guilt is to acknowledge that the experience of moral guilt is real, but that it does not mean anything. That is, the human moral faculty is not reliable although it is tempting to believe there is more meaning there than there is. Alternatively, if one wants to take the experience of guilt more seriously then everyone is guilty as ...


2

(I don't have formal training in philosophy; I'm a physicist who really likes The Myth of Sisyphus; other commenters on this forum will no doubt give you a better placement of this sentiment in philosophical traditions. This is how I understand that passage in relation to the rest of the work.) Camus's Myth of Sisyphus is concerned with what he calls the ...


1

Camus does not, I would argue, create a circular definition of the absurd. What he outlines as The Absurd is not something we seek to maintain in the religious sense (God exists because it says in The Bible that God exists, etc etc), but in the practical sense. To Camus, it is not that we should force the absurd to exist; merely that, in contemplation, one ...


1

Rolling a large rock up a hill is pointless, and such a task was imposed by the gods as punishment for Sisyphus; Camus, however, uses this as a symbol of the human condition when a meaningful world has been undermined by the intellectual collapse of European religion - ie Christianity; Camus locates meaning in the very action of living, it's this action that ...


1

You can see : Robert Zaretsky, A Life Worth Living : Albert Camus and the Quest for Meaning (2013), page 13: In its pages [The Myth of Sisyphus], Camus pursues the perennial prey of philosophy — the questions of who we are, where and whether we can find meaning, and what we can truly know about ourselves and the world — less with the intention of ...


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