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Try reading it and see! There’s probably not a really satisfying answer for the general case. It’s one of the great works of literature as well as philosophy, a cultural monument and apex and touchstone in its own right; and it is as open to you as it is for anyone for an immediate encounter. I would really suggest that in general don’t be worried about not ...


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The dichotomy of the question (Communism vs. Capitalism) and the dichotomy actually mentioned in the quote are very different. The quote says Camus saw oppression in the Soviet Union (and the Soviet system in general) as the "primary problem for the left" post-war. That is hardly the same thing as him feeling forced into a choice between Communism and ...


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In general, A Happy Death (1936-38), as well as the following Camus' novel : The Stranger (1942), which share with the previous one the title character : Mersault, revolves around the attempt to make sense of life, despite its absurdity (i.e. llack of sense, of meaning). The basic questions are : are money, love, success, the way to "give sense" to life ? ...


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(I don't have formal training in philosophy; I'm a physicist who really likes The Myth of Sisyphus; other commenters on this forum will no doubt give you a better placement of this sentiment in philosophical traditions. This is how I understand that passage in relation to the rest of the work.) Camus's Myth of Sisyphus is concerned with what he calls the ...


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The popcorn interpretation of Meursault is that his detachment from events is authentic because he is estranged from the faked, or at least over blown, grief of others. But does that do justice to the subtlety of Camus's philosophy? That probably depends on whether he assimilated and then went beyond the lessons of Heidegger The Meursault of Part I could ...


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Most of what is regurgitated here is false, including that Camus was an existentialist who who believed in free will. He did not believe in free will, and The Fall is partly a condemnation of Sartre. The book describes a man who had a life similar to Camus', then, after a tragic moment which makes him feel guilty of inaction, begins to reflect on his entire ...


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Here is how Ronald Aronson describes what is going on in Albert Camus's The Fall: This sense of moral complexity is most eloquent in his short novel The Fall, whose single character, Clamence, has been variously identified as everyman, a Camus-character, and a Sartre-character. He was all of these. Clamence is clearly evil, guilty of standing by as a ...


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What is the significance of The Stranger's lack of grief over his mother's death …? L’Étranger is one book that definitely needs to be read in the original language. It loses so much in translation, leaving it, as a comment in one of the other answers said, "boring, stupid, and a little sleazy". In fact, the very first line, which in French establishes ...


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David Simpson writes of Albert Camus: [my emphasis] Camus is often classified as an existentialist writer, and it is easy to see why. Affinities with Kierkegaard and Sartre are patent. He shares with these philosophers (and with the other major writers in the existentialist tradition, from Augustine and Pascal to Dostoyevsky and Nietzsche) an habitual and ...


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Albert Camus gives in the preface an explanation of his intent: The fundamental subject of The Myth of Sisyphus is this: it is legitimate and necessary to wonder whether life has a meaning; therefore it is legitimate to meet the problem of suicide face to face. The answer, underlying and appearing through the paradoxes which cover it, is this: even if one ...


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Reading the whole of the text might help; just beffore the end you would find: Je veux que tout me soit expliqué ou rien. Et la raison est impuissante devant ce cri du cœur. L'esprit éveillé par cette exigence cherche et ne trouve que contradictions et déraisonnements. Ce que je ne comprends pas est sans raison. Science is ...


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Ronald Aronson writes: Camus sees this question of suicide as a natural response to an underlying premise, namely that life is absurd in a variety of ways. As we have seen, both the presence and absence of life (i.e., death) give rise to the condition: it is absurd to continually seek meaning in life when there is none, and it is absurd to hope for some ...


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For Foucault, like Nietzsche, there is a kind of evolutionary dynamic to knowledge. The idea of money say, is not objectively real, but a society with it will have additional capacities, which help in some ways to spread their mode of life - metaphorical truth, derived from advantage by living as though something were objectively true. Power and success in ...


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One must imagine Sisyphus happy => One must imagine Sisyphus not unhappy. Consider following assumptions in context of whole essay. A. Life is Absurd and meaningless. B. Search for meaning when there is none causes (existential) unhappiness. C. Every goal is as absurd as other. Rolling boulder uphill and to watch it roll down repeatedly represents a ...


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Just going to keep it short since a wall of text is a bit too much for this. He means the act of the individual creating their own meaning, checking their theory for errors, and replacing it with a theory which lines up with your current level of understanding. Explore the world physically and intellectually as much as possible to construct a personalized ...


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