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22

In the sections leading up to that claim Carnap discusses a first class of what he calls 'pseudo-statements', which are all sentences characterized by having in them some 'meaningless' word. The sentence "kjdfho is great" is a pseudo-statement of that first class, because it includes the presumably meaningless expression 'kjdfho'. Then, in §4 Carnap ...


8

My reading of Carnap's "The Elimination of Metaphysics Through Logical Analysis of Language" suggests to me that it is possible to form sentences in a language that are grammatically correct but logically meaningless. The consequence of this is that the statement, due to its logical incoherence, cannot be proven to be true or false. And likewise, if a ...


7

The second OP quote (footnote about the mystical streak) refers to a meeting with Wittgenstein by Anscombe herself. For an account of Wittgenstein's relation to the Vienna circle philosophy see Stern's Wittgenstein versus Carnap on physicalism. As for Carnap, Anscombe most likely refers to his self-account of meetings with Wittgenstein in the Autobiography,...


5

Your second sentence might not be true, depending on what interpretation you take. If you mean "the set of prime numbers and the set of [not-prime] numbers," it's false because Caeser is not a number and therefore not part of either set. If you mean "the set of prime numbers and the set of not-[prime numbers]," that doesn't make sense because it's not really ...


5

Carnap was a comptabilist. From the Carnap's "Philosophical Foundation of Physics" as quoted in the "Cambridge Companion to Carnap" p 303: Free choice is a decision made by some one capable of foreseeing the consequences of alternate action and choosing that which he prefers. There is no contradiction between free choice understood in this way and ...


2

This is just a small supplement to Conifold’s answer, which I find excellent. Near the end of §81 (on the admissibility of of the material mode of speech) in Logical Syntax of Language, Carnap lists examples of «dangerous» (likely to be confused) expressions under the headings of «the mythology of the inexpressible» and «the mythology of higher things». It ...


2

You need to be careful with the extent to which Logical Positivist statements are analysed metaphysically. It is a common cliché to say that the axioms of the Logical positivist system could not be proven by their own theories, and this is true, what does not follow is the conclusion that their theories themselves are therefore meaningless. Firstly it's ...


2

Maybe Carnap was trying to recreate the process of thinking represented in the Tractatus - but he does not seem to have recognised the contradiction of dissolving the sense in metaphysical propositions through propositions themselves, as did Wittgenstein with his phrase at the end of the Tractatus, that he hopes that someone, after having used this "ladder" ...


2

The book is called "An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science": books.google.fr/books?id=bkbCAgAAQBAJ See chapter 22 for the parts about free will. (The whole book is great though!) It was based on his lecture course "Philosophical Foundations of Physics": http://digital.library.pitt.edu/u/ulsmanuscripts/pdf/31735061813675.pdf


1

Hilary Putnam's lecture at UCD (Univ. College Dublin) on acceptance of the Ulysses Medal brought some "sanity" to this subject in my opinion. Last I checked it was still available online. The lecture is not hard to understand. (Sorry it is no longer available at UCD). It does appear to be available on YouTube: Putnam: The fact/value dichotomy and it's ...


1

The analysis I've seen of such statements used a different example: (1) The present king of France is bald. This was brought up in the context of wanting to formalize the meaning of statements and applying formal logic to them. Frege and lots of mathematicians after him regard statements as predicates: given a context of interpretation, they are supposed ...


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