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You are correct that the CI does not mandate any specific code of behavior. The CI says: Act only according to that maxim whereby you can, at the same time, will that it should become a universal law. But what is a "maxim"? If we allow any rule of behavior as a maxim, then a person named Dave Jackson could say, "steal if your name is Dave ...


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When deontologists apply the categorical imperative, "Act only according to that maxim whereby you can, at the same time, will that it should become a universal law.", in layman terms "What would happen if everybody did the same ?", it might look like a consequentialist approach, but it is not. Note how it does not focus on the real ...


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This is an intriguing question, but I think the answer is negative. Your analysis would be correct if Kant said, "Act always and only ..." I think what we get out of the categorical imperative is the negative imperative. That is, it is the very limit of our freedom: it says you may never do things that are incompatible with the CI. However, ...


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