5 votes

If X causes Y, where does Y gain its properties from? Are they transferred over from the cause X?

You consider the case that one moving ball hits a second ball at rest, and now the second ball moves while the first is at rest. This a standard experiment from mechanics and works best under the ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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3 votes

If X causes Y, where does Y gain its properties from? Are they transferred over from the cause X?

In an aristotelician setting, and if understand your question correctly, this would be the case. For a property, Aristotle distinguishes between its potentiality and its actuality. Typically, as in ...
Johan's user avatar
  • 336
2 votes

If X causes Y, where does Y gain its properties from? Are they transferred over from the cause X?

In physics objects can have properties such as momentum and energy which can be transferred between objects when they interact. That does have a logical and experimental underpinning, which you can ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
1 vote

Do descriptions of what exist map to causes recognized by Man? Can we describe coherent models for broad patterns of knowledge?

Your suggested tabular map of fundamental categories of cause doesn't seem to map to your headline question about knowledge in any obvious way, but that could be my inability to make sense of your ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
1 vote

Do descriptions of what exist map to causes recognized by Man? Can we describe coherent models for broad patterns of knowledge?

Your question is probing the problem that under physicalism, neither psyche nor morality are causal. This leads to the denial of free will by most physicalists, and also two ways to conclude that ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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1 vote

Are there any conserved properties in causation?

'Causality' is really just a way of constructing narratives, and we tend to like doing that about subjects. Physics often has situations where multiple outcomes could happen, like systems with high ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 21.2k
1 vote

Are there any conserved properties in causation?

According to current mainstream theories of physics, the following are always strictly conserved: mass/energy, charge, momentum and angular momentum. There is a logical reason for that: Noether's ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar

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