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God's attributes known negatively Following St. Damascene (De Fide Orth. i, 4), St. Thomas Aquinas writes (Summa Theologica I q. 2 a. 2 arg. 2): we cannot know in what God's essence consists, but solely in what it does not consist This is called apophatic theology; ἀποϕατικός = negative. This is the manner in which we know the divine attributes by natural ...


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The scholarly material I have come across is in academic journals : 1.Five Proofs of the Existence of God by Edward Feser Review by: Ricardo Barroso Batista Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia, T. 74, Fasc. 1, Pierre Duhem e Ernst Mach: Ciência e Filosofia / Pierre Duhem and Ernst Mach: Science and Philosophy (2018), pp. 333-338. 2.The Last Superstition: A ...


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If any morally good action is not spontaneous, is it truly morally good? I give to a certain charity in a regular basis - it's part of my written budget, and I have auto-pay set up with my bank for it. I selected that charity in particular after considering what causes are important to me and researching the charity in question to make sure that they were ...


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A passage in the Church of England liturgy, which I have heard many times, says of the Trinity "And yet they are not three incomprehensibles but one incomprehensible". This is implying that logic is quite the wrong tool to be applying to the mystery of the Divine. That is to say, whether the Trinity can be logically supported as monotheistic is ...


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The impersonal God fulfils, if may put it so, a metaphysical role which neither entails nor precludes a joint personal religious role. If this appears paradoxical, it is not really so. In Descartes' Meditations, for example, God guarantees the truth of our clear and distinct ideas. I mean, since I am not on site to parade my views about God, that Descartes ...


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Since you tagged this with the "Christianity" tag: if you want to look at some arguments for and against the impersonal view of God in the Christian tradition, Google "classical theism vs theistic personalism". Classical theism is the view that God is metaphysically ultimate and "simple" in the sense of the doctrine of divine simplicity; God is without parts ...


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There is a key difference here between doing evil and the potential to do evil. It is perfectly possible for a being to have free will and hence the potential to do evil, but to refrain from doing so. This is how God behaves. Christian dogma has it that, in practice, Christ was the only human who ever achieved that ideal and we ordinary folk always fall ...


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When you say "logically supported," the answer is probably not, logic being a system of strict distinctions and exclusive identities braced up by such dichotomous principles as "law of the excluded middle." But the real mystery of the Holy Trinity may be that it is considered so mysterious, when so much of philosophy and human thinking in ...


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One of the biggest differences is that Neoplatonism, at least in its early forms, does not personify the divine. We may identify God the Father with the Neoplatonic "One," but in doing so, we either have to attribute a persona to the abstract singularity that is "the One," or we have to deny the personified descriptions of God the Father ...


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1. Does Aristotle define a "first principle" in a genus? In Metaphysics 998a20-999a23, which St. Thomas commentates in Metaphysica lib. 3 l. 8, Aristotle discusses the problem whether genera (γένη) must be regarded as the elements (στοιχεῖα) and principles (ἀρχὰς) of things Commenting on Metaphysics 1018b9, Things are said to be prior and subsequent ...


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Welcome Arlo Curley A good, stimulating question though I doubt if it can be answered except against the background of assumptions about the nature and character of God's activity. On which, I might add, there is not likely to be consensus even among Christians. Also I am going to suggest that the question is unanswerable non-circularly. In other words, ...


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The two words have similar lexical meanings. Ummah, from أمة means "nation, people, community" while ecclesia, from ἐκκλησία, means "assembly". In Christianity it came to refer to the assembled people of God, or the church. From the perspective of Christianity, the biggest difference is that while the ummah is a community of people, the ecclesia of God is a ...


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The seed of the argument present in Reformed Epistemology, but it has been advanced by various writers and Philosophers, the most famed are: Alvin Plantinga (1932- ). William Lane Craig (1949- ). Basic beliefs=Foundational beliefs=Core beliefs. Properly basic: a- Self-evident. b- Incorrigible. For existence of God as a Properly basic belief, there are ...


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