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5 votes

Are classes of objects inherent or subjective?

What you are talking about are called universals. To know what something is (here, that some concrete thing you've encountered is a cat) is to know its form. The form of a thing is that which causes ...
Laurentius Oktavian Zamoyski's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

draw a distinction between a class (abstract) and the set of all members (concrete)

In logic and various other areas the terms type and token are used. From the WP article type-token distinction: The type–token distinction is the difference between naming a class (type) of objects ...
nwr's user avatar
  • 3,535
4 votes

Book request: A nosology of untruths

The Definition of Lying and Deception on SEP. Differentiating everyday lies: A typology of lies based on beneficiary and motivation. Paper Real Lies, White Lies and Gray Lies: Towards a Typology of ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

How is Rawls's "liberalism" reasonably classified as liberal by this SEP article?

Perhaps the concept of "liberty per se" is not very stable, or is even self-defeating. The freedom-to-lose-freedom, for example, seems (A) wrong to use or (B) wrong to even have. So one ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Can the capitalist class, as individuals, relate to proletarians in non-abusive ways?

Individuals of the capitalist class are perfectly capable to relate to the struggles of the proletarians. Most prominently Friedrich Engels himself was a capitalist. He owned a factory and thus was ...
mond's user avatar
  • 304
3 votes

Relationship between basic statements of knowledge and rare exceptions

Let's start with an anecdote: According to Diogenes Laërtius, when Plato gave the tongue-in-cheek[35] definition of man as "featherless bipeds", Diogenes plucked a chicken and brought it ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
3 votes

Book request: A nosology of untruths

Let's make a list. Physiological issue. "Too drunk to fish." "Not so stunned as slow." Psychological issue. "Don't get me started!" "He crazy!" Religious fables....
Boba Fit's user avatar
  • 1,015
3 votes

What is the philosophical study of classification called?

Classification is studied in Knowledge Organization, an interdisciplinary branch of Library and Information Science. It started from practical questions how to actually organize abstract objects but ...
Jakob's user avatar
  • 131
3 votes

Difference between classification and prioritization

Consider the following set: {a,c,d,f,b,e} Classification involves splitting up into groups, for example: {a,c,d,f,b,e} → {{a,c} , {d,b}, {f,e}} Note that here the order of the elements doesn't ...
Alexander S King's user avatar
3 votes

Classifications of experience

One way to approach these kinds of questions is to break things down into contrary alternatives: is it X or not X? The nice feature of this approach is that it lets you be confident that you have ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
2 votes

Why is everything in a different category despite their similar origins?

There's no one single answer to this, because different philosophical --and scientific --systems categorize things very differently. It's perhaps easiest to say that the borders are set where they are ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.4k
2 votes

Why is everything in a different category despite their similar origins?

There is an argument that the distinct edges behind objects are an artificial construct. To use your example where we assume everything is made of atoms, there's a blurry edge between a pattern of ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
  • 18.2k
2 votes

What are borderline cases?

Best not to overthink this. A borderline case is merely a case that partially, incompletely, or imperfectly fits a category, theory, or paradigm. For instance, if we think about the category 'motor ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 20.8k
2 votes
Accepted

What is the relationship between categorization and structuralism?

Structuralism is an ambiguous term. The positive side of it to shift analysis/critique towards looking at how physical and social relations shape ideas and language, rather than assuming they can have ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 22.3k
2 votes

Are there events that are truly unique objectively? Or are these categories subjective?

I suspect your question might be closed on the grounds that it is too vague. All events can be considered objectively unique in the sense that they are specific instances. If I cough while typing ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.7k
2 votes

Relationship between basic statements of knowledge and rare exceptions

I would encourage you to consider the question in the following way. In nature there are very few kinds of objects which we might consider properly identical, in the sense that no known test could ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.7k
2 votes

Relationship between basic statements of knowledge and rare exceptions

I've been thinking about this very question for the past couple of months. I haven't been able to find any literature that discusses it directly, although it seems to be related to the distinction ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
2 votes

Are classes of objects inherent or subjective?

Objects have multiple properties, so you can classify objects in multiple ways according to their properties. Whether one classification 'jumps out' rather than another, depends in part upon the ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.7k
1 vote
Accepted

Rebuttal from first principles as a type of refutation?

Compartmentalization is a factor, here: if someone has spent x amount of time studying philosophy but y < x amount of time studying mathematics, and their familiarity with the latter is mediated by ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
1 vote

Is there a logic of non-universal class characteristics?

Seems to me that you would enjoy Fines "the Logic of Essence". Fine gives a formal language for talking about "truths in virtue of the nature of objects with certain properties". ...
emesupap's user avatar
  • 2,462
1 vote

What are borderline cases?

A lot of thinkers fall into a trap of thinking that there is one correct definition, and that somehow language is tidy, like a mathematical theorem. No such luck. Ludwig Wittgenstein famously adduced ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
1 vote

Why is everything in a different category despite their similar origins?

While you are right to say that everything around us is made of the same building blocks, different combinations of those building blocks have different collective properties. For example, some ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.7k
1 vote

Why is everything in a different category despite their similar origins?

Because if you don't categorize the nature around you, you cannot interact with it. You can't touch the planet, bend atoms or grab the weak force in your hand. You cannot even drink water if it is not ...
RodolfoAP's user avatar
  • 7,680
1 vote

Is this outline typical of the organization of academic analytic philosophy?

Analytic philosophy focusses on these key areas: language & logic metaphysics epistemology Your classification includes a number of non-analytic topics including: axiology, social epistemology, ...
kurt ludwig's user avatar
1 vote

Is this outline typical of the organization of academic analytic philosophy?

Short Answer To be technical, concepts are related by webs rather than hierarchies, so any attempt to map a network to a tree is normative, however, what you have given seems to be largely consistent ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
1 vote

What are things like experience of smell, taste and touch classified as?

They are classified as senses which are processed by the brain. The specifics and details of those experiences, and how you process them, develop what is referred to as your “perception”, or how your ...
Emero's user avatar
  • 48
1 vote

Is there a limit to abstraction?

Perhaps there is. According to the research of the Natural semantic metalanguage project, the problem of circular definitions is solved through the identification of semantic primes, the basic blocks ...
curiousdannii's user avatar
1 vote

Is one of the sciences superior to one (or several) of the others?

One thing I would do is separate mathematics from empirically-based sciences like physics and chemistry. The former is doubtless hugely important to the latter, but insofar as one takes mathematics to ...
Jim's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote

What is an individual thing? Examples?

Theory of forms - Wikipedia The theory of Forms or theory of Ideas is Plato's argument that non-physical (but substantial) forms (or ideas) represent the most accurate reality. When used in this ...
Ronnie Royston's user avatar

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