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11 votes
Accepted

What does Nietzsche refer to with the "backworldsmen"?

I answer with the authority of being a native German speaker and having graduated in philosophy ;) Back-world is a bad translation here. Presumably, the translator has mistaken the term "...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
  • 14.2k
9 votes

What is meant by abstract concepts and concrete concepts? Aren't the former tautologous and latter contradictory?

No, you are confusing yourself. You can have an idea about a real object, such as your laptop. You can also have an idea about something that is not real, such as justice. Both are ideas, but one is a ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 22.9k
8 votes

Do distinctions and concepts exist?

Concepts are relations between two or more phenomena. Distinctions are discrete concepts whose function is to classify. Concepts and language are very closely related. I discuss this in my post on the ...
Michael's user avatar
  • 1,281
7 votes

Do distinctions and concepts exist?

What you are asking about is the place of abstract objects in our universe. There are basically three approaches to abstract objects: Nominalism holds that abstractions are invented by us. This is ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 14.4k
6 votes

Can concepts exist without animals or human beings?

To answer your question one has to discriminate between a concept and its referent, i.e. the object to which the concept refers. One one hand, concepts live in the mind of people and some animal ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 33.1k
5 votes

Is topology of cultural ideas and concepts studied in modern philosophy?

Peirce was one of the first to invoke topology in his metaphysics. The notion of continuum and continuity is central to his account of the basic philosophical categories, and he was even led to study ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.3k
5 votes

Can concepts exist without animals or human beings?

Concepts are generally defined as things that exists in the mind. In order to talk about existence of a concept, it must have been created/imagined. Concepts are created by living beings. Abstract ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
5 votes

What is an argument (in philosophy)?

Yes, there's an entire field of study called argumentation theory which is essentially the philosophy of arguments. There are different models, in Uses of Argument (GB), Stephen Toulmin lays out a ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.6k
4 votes

Is entropy a circular reasoning concept?

The 2nd law of thermodynamics is an assertion. It is a statement that someone made that they believe to be true. It is also an assertion that is backed by an enormous body of evidence so vast that ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
4 votes

How does Kant derive the categories of the understanding from the logical forms of judgment in the Critique of Pure Reason?

The missing piece for you seems to be the fact that Kant builds on the idea of "architectonic" borrowed from Aristotle, as he mentions in the paragraph following the first OP quote:"Borrowing a term ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.3k
3 votes

How could mathematics and logic exist without us, if they are concepts created by us independent of reality?

Take inverse square laws. You can see them as mathematical or relying on logic, but they are geometrical and relational and just a part of the beingness of things. The ratios involved come from the ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What does Kierkegaard mean by recollection, repetition and remembrance?

Repetition is a key concept for Kierkegaard, and he often uses it to depict a (generally vain) attempt to recapture an previous experience, typically one of aesthetic transcendence. As far as I know, ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.1k
3 votes

Can more than 2 things be in direct opposition?

In Boolean Logic, the answer is no. For any statement (A) in a set of possible statements (or propositions), there is exactly one unique opposite statement (¬A). There can be multiple distinct ...
Alexander S King's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Did Wittgenstein consider the possibility of a private language with public content?

The SEP article does a good job of pulling together various places in Philosophical Investigations over which the private language argument sprawls (including the rule-following paradox, and the ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.3k
3 votes

Could there be such a thing as a universal logical language?

If such a universal logical language exists, it would be subject to some very peculiar limitations which were developed by Alfred Tarski. His undefinability theorem puts some very interesting ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
3 votes

How do medieval theories of reference account for *entia rationis* (objects of thought)?

Ens rationis = a being of reason is a “thing dependent for its existence upon reason or thought.“ The term being of reason contrasts to the term real being (ens in re extra animam). But of course ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 33.1k
3 votes
Accepted

Concept Formation

Hint You can consider the "classical" theory of concept, from Plato to Frege. See "On Concept and Object" (originally published as "Ueber Begriff und Gegenstand" (1892)) : the application of a ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
3 votes

Who has used Poetry for Philosophy?

AE (George Russell) was an Irish poet, not so well-known as Yeats Here is the last verse of one of his poems We must rise or we must fall: Love can know no middle way: If the great life do not ...
Rushi's user avatar
  • 3,219
3 votes

Is a paradox a concept?

Nice question. Your textbox opens with what was going to be the first line of my answer! Take Russell's barber paradox about the town in which the barber is the "one who shaves all those, and those ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k
3 votes
Accepted

draw a distinction between a class (abstract) and the set of all members (concrete)

In logic and various other areas the terms type and token are used. From the WP article type-token distinction: The type–token distinction is the difference between naming a class (type) of objects ...
nwr's user avatar
  • 3,525
3 votes
Accepted

Is there a resource cataloguing unique and fundamental concepts cross-culturally?

Short Answer The most likely source to help you will be FrameNet which organizes words into linguistic frames, a human-codified attempt to construct a web of meaning. Long Answer In philosophy, there'...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.6k
3 votes

Can concrete objects have multiple occurrences?

There is nothing unusual about abstract objects in this sense. Consider the sentence "John always puts John first." In this sentence, "John" is a word, not to be confused with John ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
3 votes

How to apply the classical theory of concepts on the mathematical concept of a limit?

The OP indicated in a comment that he is interested in broader notions of limit and not merely the one via the epsilon-delta definition. While the notion of limit formulated via epsilon-delta is ...
Mikhail Katz's user avatar
  • 1,405
3 votes

Is there a recognized topic in philosophy regarding the fallaciousness of debating what the ‘correct’ definition of a word is?

On traditional analysis accounts rooted in the essentialism originating with Socrates and Plato, definitions are indeed neither held to be assertions nor have truth values. They are mere descriptive ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Is conceivability relative to the subject?

There are two related notions of conceivability, one psychological and one philosophical. In the psychological sense, a state of affairs is conceivable or not-conceivable by an individual. One person ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
3 votes

Trying to understand reality lead to understanding useless things?

“The limits of my language mean the limits of my world.” -Ludwig Wittgenstein, TLP 5.6 "Language is a city to the building of which every human being brought a stone." -Ralph Waldo Emerson ...
CriglCragl's user avatar

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