10

It is not true. The Analects do contain "If names be not correct, language is not in accordance with the truth of things. If language be not in accordance with the truth of things, affairs cannot be carried on to success" (Legge translation) and more to that effect. He does not say words or symbols or anything like that "rule the world." I take it that ...


8

Xunzi famously argued that the human nature is evil, and thus for human beings to live in peace and harmony, they need to learn from sages (masters) 禮, and live according to the teachings of 禮 (禮 is pronounced in Korean 'ye,' meaning manners or rite or rituals; I do not know the Chinese pronunciation). Examples of 禮 are being an obedient son and wife, and ...


8

There's several factors to consider. The Analects is a compiled text. This means that it's been edited and rearranged several times and contains several layers of authorship. Not every editor necessarily agreed with every other editor about how things should go. Books XIV and XV are not in the innermost layer, but they are not in the outermost layer either. ...


6

I believe the quote is apocryphal. Some of the sentiment might be compatible with Confucianism but there are several problems for supposing Kongzi would have said this or that this would be found in a work people classically attributed to Confucius. (It is well known that the texts attributed to Confucius were not written by Confucius) There's not much talk ...


6

Understanding the Characters Parsed literally wu-wei (無為) means "non-action" ("without" would be a different character bu) but "acting without acting" is a reasonable translation for the meaning of the phrase in Daoism. Wu-wei in Confucianism As a caveat, the term does also occur in the Analects twice and a few times in the ...


4

I feel Confucianism is primarily aimed at minimising succession crisees, as discussed here: Are there opposites to the "social contract theory" where humans are regarded as naturally social beings, and yet individualism is a human invention? We can think of this in terms of game theory: as maintaining an unstable equilibrium with net benefits, over ...


4

The first published translation was to Dutch in 1675 According to the very recent paper Dijkstra, T. & Weststeijn, T., (2017). Constructing Confucius in the Low Countries. De Zeventiende Eeuw. Cultuur in de Nederlanden in interdisciplinair perspectief. 32(2), pp.137–164. (Available online here), it was not a Latin translation that has been the first one ...


4

The philosopher Alan Watts has an interpretation that I find very clarifying. He says the effortless-effort (wuwei) is like using a sailboat instead of a motor boat to travel at sea. In the sense that the engine of the motor boat must work hard while the sail does nothing but harness the wind.


3

While the modern textbook rendition of ``acting without acting'' is fairly close to the point, the phrase was really not offered as a logical paradox in ancient China. It just says not acting. (Wu=not, or without and wei=acting, or doing, or can even be rendered as intending. Ancient and classical Chinese do not distinguish these the way modern languages do)...


2

There has been two good answers, so I'm going to offer a different take on it, by way of an illustration. Consider learning how to draw; there you have in front of you a jar with cherry-blossom in it, and also a sheet of paper and a pencil in your hand; at first you will be looking closely at the cherry-blossom and trying to get its proportion right on the ...


2

譬如为山,未成一篑,止,吾止也!譬如平地,虽覆一篑,进,吾往也! I searched for this sentence, and it seems that this is the original Chinese sentence. It is kind of hard to translate, and the sentence you quoted had been distorted somehow. I first search for its modern Chinese translation and then use the google translation: For example, mounding soil to build a mountain can be ...


2

“By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by reflection, which is noblest; Second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third by experience, which is the bitterest.” -- Confucius People try to imitate the actions of people of knowledge, in hope to understand what the wise know. Reflection is for the most intelligent men. They hear the thoughts of wisdom ...


2

Interesting quote, I have never encountered it. Before my interpretation, an important note should be made which is that the translation of the quote may be causing the Confucian and that there may be multiple or better translations (this is common for old quotes). Because of this, in this translation, I believe the terms "love" and "delight" should be ...


2

Confucius, being a Chinese philosopher, would most likely be focused on interactions. These are back and forth endeavors which occur over a protracted period. Approaches like starvation and isolation are effective in preventing the individual from being able to act upon society, thus disrupting the interaction. If that fails, exalting them, putting them ...


2

By skipping to the end of this thought, we interpret "getting rid of" as being possible by either annihilation or exaltation. How annihilation works is pretty obvious. So in what sense are we rid of someone whom we have exalted? We are rid of him because prior to being exalted, he was one of us, only better. That sucks, because now we can clearly see how ...


2

This is hardly an 'everyday notion', but there is a focus on glorifying one's parents. In the Book of Filial Piety, Confucius mentinoed that making one's name famous and glorifying one's parents is the end goal of filial piety: When we have established our character by the practice of the (filial) course, so as to make our name famous in future ages and ...


1

It is difficult to place confucianism in either Virtue Ethics or Deontology, since in his teaching there is a high emphasis on both( Analects 5.7 & 14.17 ). Although trough my study and understanding of The Analects I believe that the answer is Virtue Ethics. Also the question you have asked , does suit Zilu specifically well : Analects 15.4. The ...


1

I am no expert in ancient Chinese. This is a wild guess at best: 无为而治: 无 /woo/: without. 为 /wei/: strife, forceful means, exertion. 无为/woo wei/: without imposing; without the use of forceful means; without bending others to your will; without strife; without struggle; without exertion. 而: grammatical connector, similar to "to". 治: to rule, to ...


1

Finding the meaning of Wuwei in English may be a fool's errand. The Chinese have volumes of philosophy on the word, in their own language. One should not expect an easy "meaning" of the word in English. However, it is very possible to explain varying other subjects which are closely related to Wuwei, and permit yourself to amalgamate them as part of your ...


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