32 votes

Why is it impossible for a program or AI to have semantic understanding?

There is a blatant problem with Searle’s argument and it’s quite hard to understand why it hasn’t been pointed out before: None of Mr. Searle’s brain cells understands English, yet he claims that he ...
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  • 4,230
21 votes

Is it the job of physics to explain consciousness?

The concepts on your question are largely biased. Physics describes, does not explain. See below. Since it's the job of physics to explain everything in the universe (even indirectly) False. The ...
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  • 4,824
21 votes
Accepted

Why is it impossible for a program or AI to have semantic understanding?

I find it odd that his main argument for why programs could not think was that because programs could only follow syntax rules but could not associate any understanding or semantics to words( or any ...
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  • 2,792
17 votes

Is it the job of physics to explain consciousness?

As a biologist working in neuroscience with many physicists, I used to get this question a lot. Many physicists seem to believe that prime principles + computational power = infinite explanatory power ...
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  • 179
7 votes

Why is it impossible for a program or AI to have semantic understanding?

As I see it, Searle is getting at the point that syntax is algorithmic — a system driven by predefined rules and procedures — but semantics is (as far as we can tell) not. In other words, it's easy ...
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7 votes

Why is it impossible for a program or AI to have semantic understanding?

Short Answer There's a number of positions outlined in your SEP link to Searle's Room that make clear that philosophy has not decided by consensus one way or another the question of human and semantic ...
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  • 11.2k
7 votes

Why is it impossible for a program or AI to have semantic understanding?

TL:DR; If we view brains as computing machines (which, for all we know, they are), there is no basis for Searle's claim. According to the Church-Turing thesis, which is a very respected result in ...
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5 votes

Does determinism prevent rationality?

John Lennox's idea is that we would have no reason to believe our own logical conclusions if nature, and therefore the brain itself, was deterministic. He says (40:15 - 40:48) that there would be no ...
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  • 3,767
5 votes

What's the importance of self-awareness?

I will present an opposing view which is one of the widely accepted views in the study of consciousness (and self-awareness). Let's consider the common distinction between access consciousness (A-C) ...
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4 votes

Why did Daniel Dennett not adequately explain consciousness?

There are several reasons why Dennett's "Explanation" of consciousness is not accepted as definitive: Dennett did not construct "Consciousness Explained" as a classical reasoning ...
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  • 4,787
4 votes

Does determinism prevent rationality?

"If hard determinism is true, and our thoughts are merely the results of a causal chain of atomic interactions, are reason and logic illusory?" Lennox is not speaking about "hard ...
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4 votes

What are the best Arguments against solipsism?

Argument 1: You don't (entirely) believe in Solipsism anyway You asked for help. Therefore, you believe there's someone besides you to answer. (Or at least, you consider the possibility that someone ...
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  • 359
4 votes

Intelligence as a prerequisite for consciousness/sentience?

I don't think you understand that objections to LaMDA. Intelligence isn't the problem. The problem is awareness. They are different things. We generally think of dogs as conscious beings. A dog ...
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  • 1,565
3 votes
Accepted

Does determinism prevent rationality?

"If hard determinism is true, and our thoughts are merely the results of a causal chain of atomic interactions, are reason and logic illusory?" In the sense Lennox is talking about, no. ...
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3 votes

Is it the job of physics to explain consciousness?

In seeking to describe the 'truths of nature', natural philosophy that focused on physika, 'the natural things', came to mean explicitly not animals (biology) or minds (philosophy). But physics has ...
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  • 10.8k
3 votes

Critique of those missing the Hard Problem?

My 2 cents and then some. The "hard problem" is really hard, I would say insoluble only for a certain point of view. The point of view that some refer to (Galen Strawson1, for example) as ...
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  • 944
3 votes

Critique of those missing the Hard Problem?

The problem of subjective experience is best divided into two very different questions. First, whether subjective experience exists; and second, if it does, how to explain it in terms of something ...
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  • 3,767
3 votes
Accepted

What is the philosophical term for when a property is emergent from an underlying structure?

Based on the comments, the word you were looking for is supervene, or supervenience.
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  • 300
3 votes

Emergent consciousness

We don’t know. This is the unavoidable conclusion. The famous thought experiment is the China brain thought experiment. There are many responses to this, arguing both sides. It also depends on which ...
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3 votes

Are physicalists at all in agreement what happens to conciousness if the rate of time is changed?

If all of time was reversed, we would not perceive any difference. We would remember the "future" (positive time direction) and try to predict the "past" (negative time direction)....
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  • 7,025
3 votes

Does being able to train your brain mean or logically imply that you are distinct from your brain?

Short Answer Briefly, in the analytic philosophical tradition, particularly among philosophers of mind, there is a general recognition that the self is distinct from the mind (parts of which are ...
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  • 11.2k
3 votes

Does knowledge require consciousness?

Obviously knowledge is more than data storing: An encyclopedia has no knowledge, but stores data. I take the term „conscious“ in your question in the sense of „self-conscious“. Then an autonomous Mars ...
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  • 20.6k
3 votes

Does knowledge require consciousness?

I would argue that an agent, even a non-conscious one, can be described as knowing things. We might say a Roomba knows how to clean the whole carpet. It doesn't know, how to cope with a suddenly ...
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  • 10.8k
3 votes

How is the study of consciousness (as a discipline) differs from philosophy of mind, psychology, and cognitive neuroscience?

Answer Obviously, all of the topics are closely intertwined, but if one wanted to draw distinctions, they are as follows: Not all of the mind is conscious, so any study of consciousness need not ...
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  • 11.2k
3 votes

What is consciousness? Is it the ultimate reality of our universe? What implications do the various theories of consciousness have on human life?

If you look at a foetus or zygote as their potential, then every female fertile cycle not resulting in conception is a crime, and every wasted sperm. Nature has included high levels of waste, and ...
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  • 10.8k
3 votes

Can a Philosophical Zombie realize that itself has no Qualia?

Why are we discussing qualia right now? If we discuss qualia because we experience it, a philosophical zombie would not. They would thus be distinguishable from conscious people. (Under this ...
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  • 1,221
2 votes

Has any philosopher discussed pre-cognitive or pre-linguistic conceptualization?

Pre-cognitive or pre-linguistic conceptualization has been discussed by a number of philosophers, including Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Edmund Husserl. In Phenomenology of Perception, Merleau-Ponty ...
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  • 276
2 votes

Is it the job of physics to explain consciousness?

The job of physics is to explain what it can. It's not obvious a priori what that is. Natural philosophers pondered big questions like the origin of the Earth and the stars for millennia without ...
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  • 436
2 votes

Critique of those missing the Hard Problem?

the issue is that materialists and physicalists presume a different question and answer that one instead. I feel like the two parties are talking across each other. They are all on the same page but ...
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2 votes
Accepted

Does being able to train your brain mean or logically imply that you are distinct from your brain?

Here is my reading of this passage. Thompson does not suggest that "X controls Y" means (implies) that X and Y are separate, but he does present it as one possible interpretation, the "...
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