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75

I would say it depends on the situation. Specifically, it depends on whether the person asking you the question wants to know whether you have at least $100, or exactly $100. The question could literally mean either, and only the context can decide. The former situation is likely much more common, and includes the example you mention, in which the person ...


44

tl;dr- It's a lie if the speaker intends to deceive the listener(s). More specifically, it's a lie-by-omission if the speaker intends to deceive the listener(s) by neglecting to mention something that, absent their intent to deceive, they'd have otherwise said. Lies are communications intended to deceive recipients. It depends on if there's intent to ...


10

Your question is about lying by omission, and this requires that you define lying. The definition I use is a communication with the intent to deceive. Thus, whether or not you are lying is a function of your intent, more than the actual quantity of cash you have on your person. Let's examine two cases. In the first, you have $200, and when asked you state ...


7

If someone asks you if you have $100 and you in fact do have $100 then you are telling the truth. The only way you could falsify that statement is if you do not have $100 which would mean you have less than that amount. It doesn't matter if you have more that $100. Here is the question: If you had $200, and I asked you if you had $100, would the ...


4

The correct answer to whether "no" is a lie is "it depends". When it is a lie though, it's just a plain lie, not a lie of omission. Examination of "Do you have $100?" There are four ways to answer here, depending on the intent and context of the question, which each have their places. Note 1: Whether I've lied or not depends on my interpretation of the ...


4

No, You won't be lying. Why this question is raised is because of the common misunderstanding (by the person who asks for money or anything like that). Let's build the logic (ignoring the context/situation): Person A: Do you have a car? Person B: [Has two cars] Yes. This would clearly not be considered as lie in any situation. So, If you say Yes for ...


4

As a quick aside/introduction, this answer might be better served as an answer to "what is meant be 'intensional context' in the philosophy of language?" because I go over more than just the titular question about substitutivity. However, due to a comment you made about the question of modality and the number of planets, it seems to me that a ...


4

I think several different things are mixed together here. "Eating a cookie won't hurt me, because it's only 100 calories" is not fallacious, taken at face value it is valid. Bringing in "broader context" is called the slippery slope argument, and at least traditionally doing that is considered fallacious. However, there are pragmatic defenses of the slippery ...


4

He [Aristotle] suggests that Thales chose water because of its fundamental role in coming-to-be, nutrition, and growth, and [that Thales] claims that water is the origin of the nature of moist things. If we take Hugh Lawson-Tancred's translation of the text we read : But the number and form of such a principle [of all things] they do not all proclaim to ...


3

In this part of Book II, Plato is describing the early education of the Guardians. In Waterfield's translation, this passage appears in Chapter 4, "Primary Education for the Guardians". Plato, Republic (Oxford University Press 1994) Shall we, then, casually allow our children to listen to any old stories, made up by just anyone, and to take into their ...


3

Plato would prefer to censor the story completely and eliminate it from circulation because it projects a morally incorrect image of the gods. However, he recognises that the story, so firmly entrenched in traditional religion, may need to be retained. The sacrifice of a pig was standard at proceedings of the Eleusinian mysteries, which are not named ...


2

I recognise very well the problem you are facing. It was a huge problem for me when I began reading philosophy for a degree. I can only offer suggestions that may help, not a magic keep. To illustrate my parallel experience, it took me six weeks to read Richard Robinson's 'Plato's Earlier Dialectic'. I calculated that at that rate I would not cover more than ...


2

A detailed analysis of the quote’s origin in various Greek manuscripts of Diogenes Laertius’s Lives is available here. It starts with Agamben’s remarks and expand from it. Mostly philological, though it refers to Derrida and Sloterdijk as well.


2

The quote appears in Greek, unattributed to Aristotle, with the aspiration, in the first Sermon in Samuel Johnsons' Collected Works, Sermons, vol. 14 (the edition published by Yale). In this case, of course, it is interpreted as He who has friends is no friend. The subject of the sermon is marriage, oddly. It is worth checking out.


2

A lie is internal, not external. In many contexts it's not possible to discern a lie with perfect accuracy, if all you have is external observation. Maybe the person misheard the question? Maybe there was a slip of tongue? Maybe the person remembers wrong? Maybe the person truly believes they have exactly $100? The external observation of the stated ...


2

If you had $200 cash on you right now, and I asked you if you had $100 on you, would the correct answer be yes ... But, I cannot imagine how it could depend on the situation. The answer is yes, alternatively: You have four fifties and zero hundreds, so that's a no You have debts exceeding one hundred dollars, thus having a couple of hundred dollars in ...


2

If you have a minimum of $100 in your pocket the answer is yes. "Do you have $100?" is a yes or no question. You can either produce the Benjamin or not. Off topic but... On loaning money... You have to ask yourself "Can I afford to just give this money away and never get it back? Do I want to give this money away and never get it back?" If the answer to ...


1

I will disagree with the thrust of most of these "it depends" answers, and agree with your feeling in the question: "I cannot imagine how it could depend on the situation." There ARE standard neutral default meanings in language, independent of context. (And philosophy punks itself when it goes off on unnecessary "depends" tangents.) On the other hand, the ...


1

No, that would not usually be lying. Do you have $100? Yes. Not a lie. You might also have another $100, five coins of various denominations, a coat, a pair of pants, a shirt, a key, and so on, but none of that, not even the second $100, is relevant to answering the question, in most contexts. However, if e.g. a border guard asks if you have $10,000, and ...


1

Literally interpreted you are not lying. Going further than answering yes is TMI. If it was Perry Mason asking for the purposes of retainer you would never answer more than yes or no as a binary response. Alternatively, if you have coins in a pocket and someone asks you if have "a coin" you would not normally volunteer information about those other coins ...


1

I think the issue here is that you are trying to answer a question which is ambiguous and then taking the responsibility on yourself that maybe you lied. Any attempts to answer an incomplete question would be inherently incomplete themselves. The right “answer” to this question should be a clarifying question to the asker about what exactly (s)he meant.


1

This is not a direct answer to the question, just a comment on Feynman's perspective on philosophy which may shed some light to the OP. Based on what I've read, I didn't knew him personally. Feynman was known for his pejorative opinion of philosophers. On one side, he has a strong argument: there are no corresponding ontology to express the ideas that ...


1

The way to define context is to use the foreground/backgeound distinction. If we define the text as the foreground object — the salient object or concept that is the focus of our perception (observation/discussion) — then context is those aspects of the background that affect our understanding of the text. If we are talking with someone they are the text ...


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