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23

Kierkegaard did use a technique called "indirect communication" through which he sought to emphasize the need for the reader to actually engage what was being said. In his case, this is as specific response to Danish Hegelianism which claimed that everything was understood. For Kierkegaard, the point is that some things (specifically, things like what it ...


17

There's several different problems that make the odds of the outcome you want very slim. First, let's split your question into pieces. Part 1 - Widely Received Philosophy Book What are the chances one can get a philosophy book (in the tradition of continental philosophy) published and delivered to a wide audience if one does not hold any degrees/...


16

I'd say it started around the 1950 and got off the ground around 1980 ;) That is to say, the divide as been introduced as a fighting word from the beginning; it is more about asserting the divide than about giving an adequate picture of the philosophical landscape. And it is really not advisable to do proper history of philosophy by using fighting words! ...


11

Interesting that Hegel himself writes about this in Phänomenologie des Geistes; Auf diesem ungewohnten Hemmen beruhen großenteils die Klagen über die Unverständlichkeit philosophischer Schriften, wenn anders im Individuum die sonstigen Bedingungen der Bildung, sie zu verstehen, vorhanden sind. Wir sehen in dem Gesagten den Grund des ganz bestimmten ...


11

First, "le sacre monstre" is bad French for "le monstre sacré" which while literally meaning "the holy monster" (thus the bad French putting the adjective in the wrong place) means "a public figure that is left alone" or isolated. Many continental philosophers see Hegel as evil and the source of problems, thus the devil role. He's often a target for ...


9

The Derrida volume Limited, Inc. contains the critical documents, minus Searle's piece, due to Searle's refusing permission. The publications went like this: Derrida, in 1971, delivered a lecture in Montreal entitled "Signature Event Context", which discussed the notion of communication in various philosophers from Condillac to Austin. This work was ...


8

I've actually done this (self-published), so I can give you the inside answer: No academic philosopher will respect or even ever read a philosophy book written by someone without formal credentials. There are three reasons for this: a) There is a lot of philosophical writing out there, and academic publication through the normal channels is a rigorous ...


7

Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel were divided in most significant respects by their views about realism and naturalism, the status of subject-object identity, and the nature of rationality and intellectual intuition. The differences between Fichte and Schelling are explored in depth in Hegel’s Differenz des Fichteschen und Schellingschen Systems der Philosophie (...


7

Your question, "What is the origin of the Continental vs. Analytic divide?" will probably not return many satisfying answers. There is no precise origin because the topic is very complicated and not well defined. The terms "continental" and "analytic" are not even clearly applicable to the differences today because of the global prominence of analytic ...


7

Frankly, the terms analytic and continental are not especially meaningful when applied to contemporary philosophers. Let me explain what I mean by that. Sure, there have been and still are clearly analytic and clearly continental philosophers. No one would confuse Carnap or Quine with continental philosophy. And no one is calling Foucault, Heidegger, ...


6

Alain Badiou, arguably. In his Being and Event Badiou relies heavily on Zermelo-Fraenkel axioms of set theory in order to show that "mathematics is ontology". As such, then, it is a brave attempt to build a bridge between continental and analytic philosophy. However, Badiou's grasp of mathematics in general and set theory in particular is often questioned.


6

All I have to contribute is that if you're still having trouble finding it, Searle's response has been made available on Scribd: http://www.scribd.com/doc/29238861/Reiterating-the-Differences-A-Reply-to-Derrida-by-John-R-Searle


6

Lacans notion of the mirror stage seems to rely directly on the ability of the child to see Actually, it doesn't. The case of an infant seeing itself in a mirror is used as an exemplary case of self-recognition; Lacan posits that all children pass through this stage of self-recognition, as reflected (primarily) in the mother as primary caregiver. Clearly, ...


6

I know that Derrida writes on dissemination and has an original theory of it I think he uses the term in a reasonably conventional way; AFAIK it would be a bit of a red herring to say he has a distinct theory of it. Note that the book Dissemination is actually a compendium of ostensibly unrelated material, but much of it is an examination of Plato's ...


6

I am not terribly optimistic that the division will be overcome in any sort of principled way. After all, the analytic and continental divide is still alive and well, and to mend that one there isn't even a need to be versed in a second field. One problem is that science works. Scientists don't, therefore, have much incentive to mend anything with "...


6

I would suggest that our salvation from this dilemma may come from exactly the sciences it deprives of a decent footing. Classical psychology contains places where it is still possible to study humanities from a skeptical and systematizing perspective with testable implications. The leading light in this kind of endeavor was Jung, who clearly saw his work ...


6

You need to know absolutely no logic, philosophy of language or mathematics to understand Heidegger, Derrida, Foucault, or most of the other "famous" continental philosophers. It would be hard to read the early Husserl without some logic, however. But why shut yourself off from reading non-continental philosophy? The logic required to read most papers ...


5

Existentialism, phenomenology, pragmatism, post-modernism...these all seem so important and so pervasive but none fall into any of the aforementioned categories and hardly astride. I'd argue that all of these are cross-cutting concerns, and are astride the aforementioned categories. For example, it is quite easy to identify an Existential metaphysics, an ...


5

Perhaps read Marx and Weber first? Otherwise it is indeed impossible to follow Adorno and Habermas. I don't know what one would have to do to "understand" Derida, Deleuze and Foucault. A lot of it traces back to Marx, Nietzsche and Freud. All this is a complete mess, and I have decided to stay out of it. (Marx, Nietzsche, Freud I certainly find worth ...


5

Derrida originally used the word deconstruction in Of Grammatology as a way of translating Heidegger’s term Destruktion. Nevertheless Derrida’s deconstruction can definitely be distinguished from Heidegger’s. In both cases, the first idea one must dismiss is the facile notion which has nonetheless become prevalent that either thinker was attempting to “...


5

The German is not at all ambiguous. But part of the problem is that they involve a play-on-words and work from the most basic parts of the German language. I wouldn't get too caught up on holding on to the terms specifically. After all, those are just what one translator decided to go with. As long as you grasp the concept, you can reword this in other ways....


5

No, a great many of the philosophical arguments and topics published in journals have literally nothing to do with race or gender — either of the author or in terms of the content. The questions and topics can therefore be neither inherently patriarchal nor inherently mono-racial. Adding, after several down-votes: I didn't read the question as being ...


5

As User10383 pointed out, Dissemination in Derrida should be contrasted with polysemy (among other things). An interpretation is constrained by polysemy if it considers only the various possible discrete meanings a text could have. For example, the two or more meanings of a pun. An interpretation recognizes the possibility of dissemination if it acknowledges ...


5

'Deliberate obfuscation' suggests that, privately, these philosophers have a clear formulation of their thoughts, but in writing they try to obscure them. I can't think of any reason to believe this would be true for any great philosopher. Kierkegaard's difficulty is for me mainly that, besides being long-winded, he speaks in 'hegelese', in the language of ...


5

In his book Non-Duality: A Study in Comparative Philosophy, David Loy writes: If philosophy in the nineteenth century became historically conscious, philosophy in the twentieth century has become self-conscious. Attention has shifted from the construction of metaphysical systems to the act of philosophizing, that is, thinking itself. This has taken a ...


5

First, let me make some general remarks not limited to Michel Foucault specifically. There is a balancing act in philosophy. On the one hand, it is not mathematics or hard science with clear standards of evidence and methodology, and there is vast ambiguity in most philosophically non-trivial notions and issues. To a lesser extent than poets, but ...


5

'Eichmann in Jerusalem' by Hannah Arendt discusses the questions of "what could the Jews do?" and "Why did they permit themselves to be led, like sheep, onto trains; into camps?" Arendt was a Jew that attended the trials after the war was over and asks many of the controversial questions. I don't wish to ruin the answer to these questions by quoting the book,...


5

You can get an MA in philosophy in the US without doing an undergraduate in philosophy. If you do so, most programs will be looking for a strong background in analytic skills (here not with the exact meaning it has in "analytic philosophy") such as a hard science, math, or other difficult degree. The University of Chicago has a masters in humanities where ...


4

I'd recommend Simon Glendinning's On Being With Others: Heidegger, Derrida, Wittgenstein as a nice example of the genre; Glendinning treats of a fairly narrow question (the refutations of skepticism about other minds) from a variety of perspectives-- besides the three authors listed in the subtitle, he also brings Austin and McDowell into the mix. In doing ...


4

Short answer: Foucault avoids programmatic statements and rarely passes judgments. It would be safe to say that yes, indeed, Foucault simply offers a descriptive analysis without value judgments and "solutions". Foucault does not believe that the role of the intellectual is to tell others what to do. However, we may also add that by choosing to focus his ...


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