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11 votes

What is the name of this logical fallacy: Why should your god be the one?

As mentioned in the comments, it is not a fallacy. It is a question. That is, presuming that you are arguing that your God exists. If you are just arguing that at least one god exists, then it is a ...
Josiah's user avatar
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10 votes
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What is the name of this logical fallacy: Why should your god be the one?

As currently phrased, this does not have the form of an argument, and therefore cannot be a fallacy. As @Josiah noted, this is a completely reasonable question to ask (if asked in good faith, as part ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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5 votes

Translating a sentence with a time element into first order logic

You would need a predicate L(x, t) that says that x lies at time t. Then you could write something like Ex Et P(x) ^ T(t) ^ L(x, t) which say that there is a person which at some point lied.
Johan's user avatar
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4 votes

Why these two ways of constructing an argument produce different results?

The apparent difficulties in this argument arise from the way the words and symbols that you are using are working together to create an imprecise discussion regarding the probabilities of picking an ...
Robert Benjamin's user avatar
4 votes

Rigorous, modern introductions to informal reasoning and critical thinking?

I've taught Critical Thinking for about 20 years, and I have to agree that there is no good textbook. Let me tell you where I'm coming from: Yes, I've seen all the textbooks with their unending ...
Bram28's user avatar
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4 votes

Translating a sentence with a time element into first order logic

The issue here is more to do with understanding what you are trying to express, rather than with turning it into formal logic. The word 'some' is vague, but it is usually treated in formal logic as ...
Bumble's user avatar
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3 votes
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Is the principle of non-contradiction self-evident?

"A is B" and "A is not B"…. Are both of the above statements mutually exclusive? If so, then would that not mean that the principle of non-contradiction is self-evidently true? Assume the truth ...
Mark Andrews's user avatar
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3 votes

Is this an example of the fallacy of affirming the consequent?

The fallacy of affirming the consequent can be set out formally : p → q q Therefore p We cannot validly infer the antecedent 'p' from the conditional schema and the affirmation of the consequent '...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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3 votes
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Is coherence subjective

Well, "incoherent" isn't set terminology. I'll go over which concepts are used to evaluate arguments and how they might relate to arguments being called "incoherent". If we want to formally reject an ...
Marc H.'s user avatar
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3 votes

Question about Cogito, ergo sum

Welcome, don. Thanks for a nice, reflective question. The cogito has much less importance for Descartes than is commonly supposed. Its significance is twofold: (1) it is (merely) the first truth which ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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3 votes

Did Ayn Rand embrace critical realism?

Ayn Rand thought that a world exists outside our perception and that we could create knowledge about that world. She also had wrote material saying that our knowledge is fallible, e.g. - on p. 78 of &...
alanf's user avatar
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2 votes

Necessary or Sufficient

The difference between necessary and sufficient conditions can be explained as follows: 1) Vitamin C is a sufficient condition for preventing scurvy This means that scurvy can always be prevented by ...
teekarna's user avatar
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2 votes

Is this an example of the fallacy of affirming the consequent?

Wikipedia describes affirming the consequent in the following way: Affirming the consequent, sometimes called converse error, fallacy of the converse, or confusion of necessity and sufficiency, is ...
Frank Hubeny's user avatar
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2 votes

What is the premise and conclusion here?

That's a pretty abominable argument in terms of finding a conclusion. I'd go with "it is intellectual honesty." And say there's a hidden premise that some how explains what "intellectual honesty" ...
virmaior's user avatar
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2 votes

What is the name of this logical fallacy: Why should your god be the one?

Partial fallacy, it does not disapprove God, but it does disapprove certain religions Let's assume we have agreed that there is a certain supreme being called God. But what are his positive qualities ...
rs.29's user avatar
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2 votes

What is the name of this logical fallacy: Why should your god be the one?

A concrete example: A believing Christian and a believing Muslim might give the exact same argument for the existence of their god. If we accept their arguments, it still leaves the possibility that ...
gnasher729's user avatar
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2 votes

the disembodied nature of the spectator

There are quite a few philosophers who objected that enlightenment thought the modern human either as animal rationale or homo faber, generally as a being whose particularly human traits have to be ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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2 votes
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Is it true that an argument cannot be both inductive and cogent?

First, let's review some ideas of argumentation. With deduction, we can talk about arguments about being sound and valid. Valid means the structure of the argument leads to the correct conclusion ...
J D's user avatar
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2 votes
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Help understanding deductive arguments

I think what's confusing you is the distinction between syntax and semantics. Logic is entirely concerned with syntax: with the rules governing the structure and transformation of symbols. Semantics - ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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2 votes

What Is Critical Thinking, and How Does One Go About Learning It?

First, allow me to point out that critical thinking is not so much learned as it is developed. There's an analogy here to the physical body. Newborn infants have (more-or-less) the same muscular and ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 20.6k
2 votes
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What Is Critical Thinking, and How Does One Go About Learning It?

Welcome, Iva I think the best help will come from texts on critical thinking. I suggest any of the following: Colin Swatridge, Oxford Guide to Effective Argument and Critical Thinking (Oxford ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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2 votes

Is coherence subjective

I teach my students that arguments should be clear -- which I clarify as concise, concrete, consistent, having a sensible order (conclusion at the front or back), and free from loaded language. ...
virmaior's user avatar
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2 votes

Is Such an Exhortation an Argument or Not?

I'm going to follow Habermas here, and assert that what we mean by 'reasoning' is an effort to use language to convince some person of normativity, such as the rightness, goodness, propriety, ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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2 votes

Recommend a book that teaches fact versus opinion

I frequently turn to Timothy Williamson's "I'm Right, You're Wrong" when teaching this distinction. It's a four-way debate between a scientist, logician, relativist, and layperson who happen ...
John Beverley's user avatar
2 votes

What are the differences between idealism and notion of magical thinking?

You might like to consider Samuel Johnson's retort to Berkeley's subjective idealism: "I refute it thus!" * kicks stone *. This has been called the logical fallacy 'appeal to the stone'. But ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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2 votes
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What is the view of the origin of language according to contemporary philosophy of language?

Short Answer Coming from a naturalized epistemology, the evolution of language is placed within the context of Darwinian evolution and it's modern day theoretical descendants. (Can't help myself.) ...
J D's user avatar
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1 vote

heteropathic and idiopathic identification

The essence of identification — of identifying with another person (in life or art) — is finding a sense of 'likeness' between the self and the other. This is common knowledge. Less commonly ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the name of this logical fallacy: Why should your god be the one?

I think that the question 'Why should your god be the one?' commits the very fallacy it purports to unmask. It assumes, without a shred of evidence, that there is any valid god hypothesis to consider ...
Groovy's user avatar
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1 vote

What Is Critical Thinking, and How Does One Go About Learning It?

Welcome, Iva. Thinking critically is no easy task, and there are plenty of resources out there to help you along. What anyone needs to do is develop some strategies for inculcating a set of skills, ...
J D's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the name of this logical fallacy: Why should your god be the one?

"Why should your god be the one?" Without starting a religious debate and staying at the level you wanted it to be: It is not an attempt to support any position. It is an attempt to falsify ...
retrospace's user avatar

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