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111 votes

Why do atheist euthanasia proponents consider nothingness preferable to suffering?

I think you have the logic of this backwards. In theism (and some other religious doctrines) life continues after the death of the physical body. They believe euthanasia is a negative act that can ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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84 votes

Why do atheist euthanasia proponents consider nothingness preferable to suffering?

I think it's important to note that in cases where this is considered, death is already approaching. It isn't a choice between life and death. It's a choice between dying now or going through a few ...
windblade's user avatar
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33 votes

Why do atheist euthanasia proponents consider nothingness preferable to suffering?

I have personally known two friends who, when faced with incurable cancer, elected to end their own lives at a time and in circumstances of their own choosing. Both made this choice when it was ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
25 votes

What is the motivation of all individuals to stay alive?

In purely psychological terms, all the behaviours that keep us alive are controlled or driven by the unconscious brain. That is, most of the time, we don't need to reflect on the course of actions ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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22 votes
Accepted

Does the focus on "humane" killing of animals distract from the real moral problem of killing?

"The focus on whether an animal is killed with or without suffering seems to only distract focus from the much more serious moral issue of whether or when it is morally okay to kill in the first ...
Ameet Sharma's user avatar
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19 votes

What is the motivation of all individuals to stay alive?

However, it takes nothing of these moments after death, so it would be the same if they had never existed. Suffering, on the other hand, inflicts pain on it, which it has to endure during its lifetime....
Rexcirus's user avatar
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19 votes
Accepted

Is there an ethical basis for killing less intelligent animals (as food) but not killing animals of higher intelligence?

Our assessment of the intelligence of animals is not the dominant factor in determining why some animals are more often killed for food than others. Culture, tradition, practicalities and economics ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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18 votes

What is lost upon death?

The state of being alive is lost (that is, it ends) when something dies. The state of being alive is mostly defined by having the ability to deliver the right chemistry to the right places in the ...
g s's user avatar
  • 6,190
16 votes

Why do atheist euthanasia proponents consider nothingness preferable to suffering?

Where's the illogic in preferring (1) not to exist to (2) existing and suffering in agony? It's true, from an atheist standpoint, that after euthanasia I will not know that that I have ceased to exist ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k
15 votes

Why do atheist euthanasia proponents consider nothingness preferable to suffering?

Atheists supporting euthanasia might argue the following: Death is inevitable. Living simply for the sake of trying to avoid death is illogical. Death is timeless / infinite. Dying tomorrow instead ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
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11 votes

What is lost upon death?

If I turn off the ignition, my car stops. The matter content of my car is unchanged, but various processes that took place while my car was running are no longer taking place. Death is clearly ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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10 votes

Is willful ignorance about one's own mortality escapism?

Actually the whole business of living other than the animalic part, is denying death. So the idealism you are seeking by not denying death is itself a denial of death. [I] The human animal is ...
Themobisback's user avatar
10 votes

Why do atheist euthanasia proponents consider nothingness preferable to suffering?

Death is inevitable. Dying in indignity and pain is not. If you have never experienced the indignity of lingering, painful death I understand why you would not see what is wrong with your relative ...
jwpfox's user avatar
  • 209
10 votes

What is the motivation of all individuals to stay alive?

OP's question sounds similar to the argument for nihilism. If we don't take anything with us, what's the point of living at all? Let me offer the following observation. I propose that Nihilism has it ...
JesseM's user avatar
  • 201
9 votes

Why do atheist euthanasia proponents consider nothingness preferable to suffering?

In addition to some excellent answers I would question a fundamental part of your question that assumes there is a hierarchy from the atheistic point of view. Death is not seen ubiquitously as better ...
QAsena's user avatar
  • 191
9 votes

Is life the root cause of all suffering?

According to Buddha's Theory, It is not a theory; it is large set of traditional philosophy, world-view, precept or partly religion. The word "theory" implies that there is something here ...
AnoE's user avatar
  • 2,877
8 votes

Why do atheist euthanasia proponents consider nothingness preferable to suffering?

These are my neccessary and sufficient conditions for suicide. I'm a two-pronged atheist (Any Holy Books are non-predictive, inconsistent nonsense; the Standard Model is the best description of ...
waltinator's user avatar
8 votes

Is life the root cause of all suffering?

"Desire" is one possible translation for "tanha" in Pali. But other translations would be "thirst" or even "craving". I think "craving" is more useful ...
Frank's user avatar
  • 2,454
8 votes

What is lost upon death?

It's a common misconception that death is a "moment". There are, of course, more and less sudden ways to die. But death is generally a process. Your heart stops beating, your organs shut ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 10.5k
8 votes

What is most important in life?

To crush your enemies. To see them driven before you. To hear the lamentation of the women.
David Gudeman's user avatar
7 votes

Is willful ignorance about one's own mortality escapism?

This question takes it for granted that fear of death is a logical necessary thing. However, there is nothing that is more clearly a product of evolution than fear of death. There is no deep truth ...
Phira's user avatar
  • 1,362
7 votes

What is the motivation of all individuals to stay alive?

First, you are treating Joy and Suffering asymmetrically. You don't take anything with you. Your Suffering and your Joy are gone. Using Joy as a proxy term for "anything good" and Suffering ...
Yakk's user avatar
  • 632
7 votes

Is there an ethical basis for killing less intelligent animals (as food) but not killing animals of higher intelligence?

Humans hunt everything and anything. Some animal species however don't have many individuals left, so we try to protect them. In some countries hunting is used to balance an ecosystem that is not ...
kutschkem's user avatar
  • 2,290
7 votes

What can make death not a bad thing?

Firstly, the quote you cite is nonsensical sophistry of the worst sort. You might just as well argue that if you can perfect the next five minutes then death would be harmless, since extending a ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 22.9k
7 votes

What is lost upon death?

Note: I am not a physicalist, so I am responding from my best understanding of their position. From a purely physicalist perspective, what is lost at the moment of death is a particular pattern--an ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.1k
6 votes

What is the philosophical significance of the First Law of Thermodynamics?

The Law states that “no energy can be destroyed or created..." Not quite. In its classical formulation, the 1st law says that energy is constant in a closed system. As this isn't entirely true, it ...
Alex's user avatar
  • 1,828
6 votes

Does the focus on "humane" killing of animals distract from the real moral problem of killing?

In Buddha's time, the prohibition was against killing, and not eating meat, and even monks were allowed to eat meat donated to them as alms. That's still how they do things in Tibet, where a small ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

How can death be a release from pain?

Death is nothing to us; for that which has been dissolved into its elements experiences no sensations, and that which has no sensation is nothing to us. The magnitude of pleasure reaches its limit in ...
MmmHmm's user avatar
  • 2,417
5 votes

Source for (Stoic?) quote on death/(im)mortality

Your quote is attributed to the Greek general Xenophon. It's written in "Lives of Eminent Philosophers" by Diogenes Laërtius: In this battle Epaminondas also fell. On this occasion Xenophon is said ...
Vocateur's user avatar
5 votes

Can nominalists believe in their own death?

I don't think there is a problem for nominalists here. I take nominalism to be the view that there are only individuals or particulars - concrete things or signs of concrete things, particular objects,...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k

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