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32 votes

Is there a name for this fallacy when someone says something is good by only pointing out the good things?

The specific fallacy is cherry picking evidence to support a conclusion. This is one of the most common fallacies committed by people with actual intention to be rational and is based on the invalid ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 14.6k
22 votes

What is this "going to the other extreme to make it look stupid to prove something"?

This is an invalid (although very informal) reduction to absurdity: the interlocutor is contesting the claim by contending that, if the claim is accepted, an obviously false result logically follows. ...
g s's user avatar
  • 6,325
17 votes

Is there a name for the widespread logical fallacy in which you prove your point by 'eliminating' anyone who contradicts you?

Suppression is not an argument at all, so it isn't a fallacious argument. Instead, suppression is an example of one of the reasons why appeals to authority or popularity may generate false conclusions,...
g s's user avatar
  • 6,325
16 votes

Is there a name for the argumentative tactic where you play dumb and ask for extreme simplification?

The closest I could find is : Sealioning: A subtle form of trolling involving “bad-faith” questions. You disingenuously frame your conversation as a sincere request to be enlightened, placing the ...
Idiosyncratic Soul's user avatar
13 votes

Is there a name for the argumentative tactic where you play dumb and ask for extreme simplification?

In rhetoric, argumentation requires a certain level of good will and willingness to participate honestly in the communication process. If you are on a debate stage and your opponent fakes a heart ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
12 votes

Is there a name for this fallacy when someone says something is good by only pointing out the good things?

Short Answer What you seem to be interested in is not so much a fallacy, but is called paltering. Long Answer Is there a name for this fallacy when someone says something is good by only pointing out ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
10 votes

Is there a name for the argumentative tactic where you play dumb and ask for extreme simplification?

Feigned ignorance is more or less what you're describing. Nearby are Appeal to ridicule I've seen this used dishonestly but effectively in job interviews Strawman can generally be assumed to lurk ...
Rushi's user avatar
  • 3,396
10 votes

What are valid rebuttals to utilitarianism?

(1) No, Spock's statement is not an expression of utilitarianism. (2) Here is a counterargument to utilitarianism: according to the definition you gave, if someone thinks it would be cool to commit a ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Is one commiting the "argument from authority" fallacy and/or the "consensus fallacy" when one refers to a scientific consensus when asserting truth?

The main thing to realize about informal fallacies is that they are all closely related to strong arguments, because it's the resemblance to a strong argument that makes them seem compelling. In this ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.4k
9 votes

What are valid rebuttals to utilitarianism?

One answer the second question of the OP is the "mere addition paradox". To paraphrase, this concerns the fact that adding more people to a society can in some sense "increase ...
Yly's user avatar
  • 191
7 votes
Accepted

What is the proper response in a debate when your opponent ignores your counterarguments?

Simplify your statements by providing only one argument per statement. Rules of thumb are: Resist the temptation to fight all of the opponent's wrong points (address only one of his arguments/claims/...
Steeven's user avatar
  • 184
7 votes
Accepted

Can disputes over what is reasonable or unreasonable to believe be resolved objectively?

It depends on what you mean by 'objectively'. If objectivity is taken to be the consensus of subjective agents, for instance, by subscribing to a convention, then there is, let's call it, a first-...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
6 votes
Accepted

Is there (or does something exist that is close to) a theory of arguments?

There is a theory of arguments, but I am afraid that the OP conception of argument is too idealized, and the notion of effective debate too narrow, to apply to most of them. If people argued from sets ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.5k
6 votes

Is one commiting the "argument from authority" fallacy and/or the "consensus fallacy" when one refers to a scientific consensus when asserting truth?

Fallacy, shamallacy -- don't try to short circuit analysis by playing pin the fallacy on the argument. Whether Alice's statement is an appeal to authority depends in detail on what her intended ...
Dave's user avatar
  • 5,338
6 votes

What is this "going to the other extreme to make it look stupid to prove something"?

The argumentative strategy you're describing is known as a "false dichotomy". The other person only thinks about only two possible scenarios as if they were the only options available. In ...
Gurpreet Singh's user avatar
5 votes

Is asking to align on definition during a debate a derailling or disingenuous demand?

You were definitely being reasonable. Half the so-called problems of philosophy build down to vague use of language, and arguments at cross-purpose are the common result of a failure to pay attention ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.6k
5 votes
Accepted

How precisely is "Steel Man" different from "Iron Man" in a debate?

In the very first paragraph, the authors write: We will argue that there are both appropriate and fallacious versions of this tactic [iron-manning]. They explain: There are compelling epistemic ...
Lowri's user avatar
  • 729
4 votes

Is one commiting the "argument from authority" fallacy and/or the "consensus fallacy" when one refers to a scientific consensus when asserting truth?

From the background story, I think it seems that Alice is committing a fallacy of appeal to consensus (argumentum ad populum). She is saying that her view is correct because it is supported by ...
IsThatTrue's user avatar
4 votes

Is one commiting the "argument from authority" fallacy and/or the "consensus fallacy" when one refers to a scientific consensus when asserting truth?

In most cases, it is impossible or impractical to find the truth 100% reliably. Sometimes it is not impossible, but impractical for me because it would take huge effort. So instead of establishing the ...
gnasher729's user avatar
  • 5,647
4 votes

What is a logical fallacy that involves arguing according to a different definition of a word?

This sounds like an example of equivocation, which Wikipedia defines as follows the misleading use of a term with more than one meaning or sense (by glossing over which meaning is intended at a ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 387
4 votes

How does philosophy advance despite irreconcilable background assumptions ("positions") on every topic?

In an ordinary debate, the goal is (theoretically) functional --to reach a single, objective, best conclusion, proceeding from shared premises, via the route of eliminating falsehoods, confusions, and ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.4k
4 votes
Accepted

How to debate with someone who asks for proof of a fact they are not denying

I've seen the expression "argument from ignorance is a fallacy" applied to this approach, but I firmly believe that "argument from ignorance" is merely another way of saying, "the burden of proof is ...
elliot svensson's user avatar
4 votes

Which fallacy: Thinking everything someone does in a discussion that's wrong is a fallacy?

Calling something a fallacy when it is not is of course a mistake. And, you're right: sometimes people will try to reject the conclusion of an argument by pointing out a fallacy with the argument, ...
Bram28's user avatar
  • 2,719
4 votes

Is there a name for explaining or discussing a topic from various viewpoints/perspectives?

This seems a form of passive learning, where information is just presented, and the learner should take its own conclusions. But passive learning does not focus on multiple perspectives, just on ...
RodolfoAP's user avatar
  • 7,661
4 votes

Is there a name for this fallacy when someone says something is good by only pointing out the good things?

The argument "X is good because of Y" is a problematic argument. "good" has little meaning outside of a carefully constructed context and is the meaning is most often subjective. ...
stevea's user avatar
  • 141
3 votes

Any good philosophy debate recommendations?

There was a classic radio debate between Bertrand Russell and FC Copleston on the existence of God. I'm not sure if the full debate is online but here's about 20 minutes of it : https://www.youtube....
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k
3 votes

What is a logical fallacy that involves arguing according to a different definition of a word?

You are describing the No True Scotsman fallacy, which you might understand as a special form of equivocation (as in the good suggestion in another answer). NTS involves insulating a claim from ...
ChristopherE's user avatar
  • 5,548
3 votes
Accepted

If I am unable to rebut a person's argument - am I obligated to accept it?

No. Real life arguments are not logically ironclad, they rely on plausible inferences and judgments to reach a conclusion. Many are sensitive to context, and may not be as plausible at all when ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.5k
3 votes

Are there any positive arguments for atheism not rooted in self interest

Atheism isnt an argument. It's not a religious belief. It just means you dont believe that a theistic god exists... but it comes with an "until further notice". "Prove me wrong." I ...
wahwahwah's user avatar
  • 394

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