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Derrida generally resisted labels, and in particular he resisted the label of post-structuralism because his ideas were derived from structuralism—différance arising from Ferdinand de Saussure's linguistics—and, in point of fact, deconstruction only makes sense as long as it forms an extension of the structuralist approach, i.e. is within the bounds of a ...


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My understanding is that the key to understanding the phrase is surprisingly simple. According to Michael Wood in the London Review of Books: "It did not hold, as many of its detractors thought it did, that there was no reality apart from language, and it’s wrong to translate Derrida’s famous ‘Il n’y a pas de hors-texte’ as ‘there is nothing outside ...


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I know that Derrida writes on dissemination and has an original theory of it I think he uses the term in a reasonably conventional way; AFAIK it would be a bit of a red herring to say he has a distinct theory of it. Note that the book Dissemination is actually a compendium of ostensibly unrelated material, but much of it is an examination of Plato's ...


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As User10383 pointed out, Dissemination in Derrida should be contrasted with polysemy (among other things). An interpretation is constrained by polysemy if it considers only the various possible discrete meanings a text could have. For example, the two or more meanings of a pun. An interpretation recognizes the possibility of dissemination if it acknowledges ...


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Derrida originally used the word deconstruction in Of Grammatology as a way of translating Heidegger’s term Destruktion. Nevertheless Derrida’s deconstruction can definitely be distinguished from Heidegger’s. In both cases, the first idea one must dismiss is the facile notion which has nonetheless become prevalent that either thinker was attempting to “...


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tl;dr - deconstruction is something specific (usually from Derrida less commonly from Heidegger). Post-structuralism is a near synonym for late 20th century French philosophy and is a type of "post-modernism." Post-modernism is a term which means anything after modernity -- no idea what it means without context. Postmodernism is a grab bag term that applies ...


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Derrida once explained that this assertion [means] there is nothing outside context. source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Derrida#Philosophy So inasmuch as literary criticism and philosophy are different contexts one might suppose the phrase could be taken and developed differently. However, the original context is Derridean and quite specific....


3

As is typical for Derrida-related concepts, the short answer would be something like both yet neither. "Metaphysics of presence" refers to the way in which our thought privileges what is present over that which is absent. "Presence" in this sense can be a physical presence, a temporal duration, a presence in thought, a presence in speech—any mode of being-...


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I know Derrida better than I know formal logic, but i'll do my best to incorporate that perspective. What I think this author leaves unmentioned, which is most important to understanding this configuration Derrida's thought, is the concept of a system's center, as it is called in "Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences", or the ...


2

It is an important challenge. According to the Theory of Types, every proposition belongs to a certain order. In original Gödel sentence G, the order of G is ambiguous. The original sentence ~(T -> G) should be a simultaneous assertion of multiple sentences of this kind: ~(T -> Gn), where n is a natural number, and Gn stands for "...


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I think you are right : the Incompleteness Theorem is a perfectly valid mathematical result and is of GREAT value in mathematics where it originated. Regarding his "philosophical significance" ... the discussion is impressive and the conclusion is still missing. This - I think - is a common pattern : in XVII century the pooof of Law of Gravitation by ...


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Is the following paragraph talking about a specific artwork by Sarah Lucas, titled 'Self-portrait with fried eggs' or her series of portraits called 'Self-Portrait'? It's the self-portrait with fried eggs given the article mentions the 'ancient Indian' dancing girl, and the pose she strikes. What is the eternal triangle here? The pudenda - just look at ...


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From Critchley and Schroeder (eds.) - A Companion to Continental Philosophy: Destruktion (according to Heidegger) is a way of unearthing the deep truth of the tradition, but Derrida argues that in fact it merely loosens the grip of the most prestigious and powerful elements of tradition. A deconstruction frees up the repressed senses, the silenced ...


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In her essay on Post-Modernism, Linda Hutcheon states that "Poststructuralist discourse paradoxically contests, yet unavoidably inscribes, the very preconceptions it seeks to challenge." in her A poetics of postmodernism(55) From what I gathered in literary theory, and correct me if I'm wrong Post-structuralism in its attempt to deconstruct structure, it ...


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As to what your friend might mean by "after theory": I understand it to be a strain of thinking that speculates on the end of theory (especially postmodern and poststructuralist theory, which flourished in the 1980s and 1990s) and examining its impact on the fields of literature, philosophy, etc. If your friend has a similar idea in mind, Terry Eagleton's ...


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I'm not overly familiar with Heideggers thought, however a review of his Basic Concepts of Aristotelian Philosophy states that despite the revolutionary impact of Being and Time, Heidegger developed some of his most central ideas by the most traditional of routes: commentary on the Philosopher. For example, in De Anima Aristotle suggests that one of the ...


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I don't recall Derrida making that statement but the discussion of Augustine, Heidegger, Destruction/Deconstruction, and prayer comes up in Circumfession. Maybe this is what you are looking for: http://www.ubu.com/sound/derrida.html


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Your view might hold to a narrow interpretation of logocentrism with a written and spoken word; Derrida, one may argue, is not so strict in his interpretation of what is the “text”. One of the ongoing problems with any interpretation/comparison with any Derridian concept is there are no exact meanings to Derrida. Derrida can argue that it is not the written ...


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One of the primary problems with considering deconstruction a "method" is that it effaces the complexity and nuance of the actual way by which deconstruction occurs, and reduces it into a mechanistic operation that a reader can perform on a text. Instead, deconstruction is something that happens within the text, and an outside reader then interprets the ...


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The basic enterprise of contemporary literary criticism is actually quite simple. It is based on the observation that with a sufficient amount of clever handwaving and artful verbiage, you can interpret any piece of writing as a statement about anything at all. This is a degeneration of Derridas Deconstruction which could be viewed as an attack on the then ...


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I will try to analyze this argument using proposition dependency. But why must dependency of proposition? Because proposition must be associated with existences or it's meaningless, and how an existence related to other existence is through a dependency. Proposition dependency: A proposition is constructed to understand realities (existences). Existences ...


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