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I'll consider that your question is two-fold, one relating to the relationship between Deleuze & Hegel, and secondly, the source of inspiration of Difference & Repetition. With regard to the first question, Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995) had an educational formation steeped in the history of philosophy. From major to minor characters in the history of ...


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In a sense, Deleuze's virtual and Lewis's possible worlds compete to provide the "right" conception of the possible. The descriptions are indeed similar but this is deceptive, Deleuze and Lewis, in part reflecting their respective traditions (continental and analytic), are far apart on the possible because they are far apart on the real. Lewis's "real" is ...


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I agree with Ben that calling work "obscurantism" is not ad hominem. Academic obscurantism seems to me at least a problem and possibly an important phenomenon which needs understanding. Warning: I'm not a Deleuze expert; I'm at best an amateur epistemologiost. I do understand, however, that obscurantism and difficulty of topic are two entirely different ...


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Deleuze picks up the concept of multiplicity from Riemann and Bergson and develops it in many of his works and in a variety of ways. In general, he rejects the One-Many dialectic and proposes multiplicity instead: [M]ultiplicity must not designate a combination of the many and the one, but rather an organisation belonging to the many as such, which ...


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The Last man is Nietzsche's antithesis of the Übermensch in Thus Spoke Zarathustra. The Last Man sought eternal life at all costs, including costs Nietzsche despised, such as sacrificing love and happiness. Excerpts from Zarathustra's Prologue suggest that Deleuze's quote may be in reference to the Preachers of Death in I 9. They appear to have the ...


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Firstly - in DR Deleuze is primarily giving a theory of individuation, using Maimon's critique of Kant as a wedge (that knowing the conditions of possibility is not enough - these ground, as it were, multiple potential realities. We need a complimentary account of the conditions of genesis of the actual). Deleuze's theory of individuation is based on ...


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This is not a direct answer to the question, but more context, and thus it may be useful for others. To me, Deleuze is either a genius or a madman. His works seem as some form of nonsensical free-verse poetry littered with alliteration and assonance, yet there may be something meaningful within that is encrypted therein, requiring more than intelligence to ...


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More of an extended in passing comment than an answer, but I thought some of it might be constructive. Deleuze takes up the theme of "rigorous and inexact" notions at the heart of science and philosophy elsewhere in Negotiations. Even though they're discussing A Thousand Plateaus, the discussion there maybe has some valences in common here, in terms of ...


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This is an extended commentary to the question. In the beginning of Matter and Memory Bergson clearly declares his dualism: This book affirms the reality of spirit and the reality of matter... It is, then, frankly dualistic. (p.XI) In principle, this should prohibit any possibility of physicalist development. However, a literal understanding of his ...


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There seem to be several questions here, I'll address the first and second: I'm not a Deleuze scholar but his claim seems fairly clear from the quote. In the Greek system, according to D, when people commit crimes, the blame is shifted to the gods. In Christian belief, on the other hand, people are responsible for their own sins, but Jesus takes the ...


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I would speculate that it has to do with the (apparent) indispensability of numbers. To unpack that a bit, I want to begin by talking about what it would mean for the word "dog" not to exist. Taking the word "dog" as a sign, let's divide it into signifier and signified, taking care to identify both as essentially abstract. What I mean by that is that the ...


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I think that it is misleading to speak of "words". Words obviously exists. According to me, we have to speak of "concepts". Trying to "compress" a Treatise of Ontology in a few lines, we have objects; we are used to think at them as something that we can "see and touch" : the table, my keybord, the dog in the street. Obviously, we have no problem in ...


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Spinoza's treatment of cosmology and theology is unique in the philosophical tradition. It is certainly true that God plays an essential role throughout Spinoza's thought. He always appears, however, in the very strange form signaled by Spinoza's recurrent phrase, "God, or nature." For Spinoza, only what is capable of independent being and cognition counts ...


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This is a criticism that I hear occasionally. Note that in Guattari's case his background involved extensive and radical clinical work with schizophrenic patients. And it might help to keep in mind that the term in their work is linked closely to a very careful historical study of the relationship of psychoanalysis and capitalism to schizophrenia (including ...


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The reference is to Plato's Sophist, to which Deleuze refers with some frequency, albeit, at times, quite obliquely. This is a text where the key question is often "How?" and perhaps more importantly "What is it?" Moreover, it articulates a concept of "simulacrum" and provides a rejoinder avant le lettre to the Neo-Platonic reading of Parmenides (and hence ...


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Allow me to quickly make a first point of clarification. While we normally talk about cinema in terms of their "narrative structure", the level of conceptual specificity that Deleuze invokes in these books requires that we make crucial distinctions between the notion of connection of images and "narrative". As a story-telling species, language naturally ...


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From the perspective of these two philosophers there's not a debate about whether set theory or differential calculus are better, more important, more appropriate or anything in general terms. The discussion framing the book mentioned by DeLanda revolves around metaphysics and the specific claim made by Badiou that Set Theory was sufficient to found what ...


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You could try : Calvin O. Schrag, The Resources of Rationality: A Response to the Postmodern Challenge, ISBN 10: 0253350549 / ISBN 13: 9780253350541 Published by Indiana University Press, United States, 1992. This ranges widely, as you might expect from the title, but does address Deleuze. There's a different but equally critical angle on Deleuze (among ...


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Thinking creates its “concepts” out of the visible, in order to designate the invisible. .. Does this connect to Deleuzes idea of philosophy as he wrote in What is Philosophy? The answer to this must be no, it does not connect. What is Philosophy draws 3 clear distinctions - Art; which he describes as the creation of percepts and affects; science; which ...


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It seems clear in context that what one is meant to be wishing for when wishing for eternal recurrence is the repetition of this moment now. The point is to always live in such a way that you would not want any alternative version of the current moment more than the one that is already happening, if you could back off and consider it in context for ...


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I am not an expert on Baudrillards views, so my response will relate only to what Deleuze & Guattari wrote on this theme, often labled "accelerationism". However what I understand of Baudrillard's view leads me to believe he takes a vastly different approach and holds a vastly different understanding of what's at stake in this question, so I would always ...


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By far the best thing is to read Deleuze himself; on this question I think Proust and Signs and Cinema 2 are maybe most useful. A few indirect (and probably too elliptical) suggestions follow below. One apology is that rendering this material “flat” is an injustice to it. The virtual could feasibly be said to name this place where factual and counter ...


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I don't have a clear picture of Taussig's discussion of this topic as I have not read him in a long time, but your closest bet to getting a Deleuzian response to this question would be via the work of Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, particularly in Cannibal Metaphysics. He does perhaps the most or any contemporary author to flesh out the transformation Deleuze ...


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A few quick thoughts. Clearly Plato's works are dramatic too. They are also, as you suggest, dramas of ideas -- of course structured very differently to Zarathustra. But my sense is that the "real" point here is that an Idea dramatizes intensive spatiotemporal dynamisms. It might be worth contrasting this part of D+R with The Method of Dramatization, a short ...


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He was here not interested in mathematics for the sake of mathematics, but for a sort of extraction of the problematics underpinning a mathematical idea. He would not consider measures or functions as tied to particular problems to be objects of great interest in philosophical development. It is the formalizaion of a problem that is of concern --that which ...


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finitist revolution I believe that refers to Cauchy/Weierstrass, epsilons and deltas and so on replacing the pre-rigorous (pre-surreal, e.g. Newton/Berkeley debate) notion of a fluxion. Which you allude to in your response to the dx part. dx From the passage you quoted I would tend to side more with what you said about the suggestiveness of the notation....


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I might suggest looking at Postulates of Linguistics, the fourth plateau I think, which deals with this in a little more depth. I wanted to draw together a few lines and thoughts here to maybe help bootstrap some further analysis. Quickly: D+G's strategy involves deployment of mutually-exclusive dualisms or binarisms; in order to shatter or crystallize the ...


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This is unpacked a bit further on in Thoburn's introduction: In Deleuze and Guattari's monist thought, then, 'life' has no primary forms or identities but is a perpetual process of configuration and variation, where politics is an art of composition, an art that affirms the variation and creation of life: "'molecular' or 'minor' processes, against ...


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