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I highly recommend the Handbook of Deontic Logic and Normative Systems. It provides an introduction to standard formalisms, conceptual distinctions, outstanding problems, and putative solutions, written by a variety of deontic logic specialists. I'd consider it a natural next step after working through Sider's text.


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The act- and rule-utiitarian distinction It does not follow, because Richard Brandt first formulated the distinction, that therefore utilitarian philosophers had not recognised a distinction long before. Their recognition can be shown by their general discussion of ethical matters. Such is precisely the case with John Stuart Mill. He very evidently possessed ...


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Other responses claim that moral rightness depends on foreseen, foreseeable, intended, or likely consequences, rather than actual ones. -Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy's Entry on Consequentialism, Section 4: Which Consequences? Actual vs. Expected Consequentialisms Your philosophy has traditionally been categorized as Consequentialist. If you want, you ...


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When deontologists apply the categorical imperative, "Act only according to that maxim whereby you can, at the same time, will that it should become a universal law.", in layman terms "What would happen if everybody did the same ?", it might look like a consequentialist approach, but it is not. Note how it does not focus on the real ...


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I know the principle seems consequentialist at first sight, but my point is that by defining what's right not in terms of how good the actual consequences of an action are, but in terms of our reasons to believe those consequences would be good, I am not appealing directly to consequences. the reasons to believe those consequences would be good must be ...


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Your principle could be both consequentialist and dentological. In what it requires of you, in the obligation it imposes, it is plainly consequentalist but that says nothing about the considerations that make it obligatory. It could be a requirement of God (as in an ethics of divine commands) or a requirement of justice, neither of these requirements having ...


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Welcome quantropy Deontological ethics need not be drastic ethics ! The term 'deontology' is a made-up modern coinage that derives from the Greek deon (duty - or near enough). Any ethics is deontological if it holds that there are actions or attitudes which are right or wrong not because of their consequences for harm or happiness but because there is ...


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I think your self-interest in this case could be justified under all three approaches, except maybe the deontic. From an "invisible hand" perspective you cannot possibly know that you are "equally good" in advance and this is precisely what the rules are meant to determine. Presumably the meritocratic outcome serves to increase overall ...


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