New answers tagged

0

Here is the question: If we are rationally obliged to be moral, and morality is not arbitrary, then are some decisions not freely made? There are two propositions that the antecedent of the conditional asks us to assume: We are rationally obliged to be moral. Morality is not arbitrary. Both of these may be true, but because people are still able to act ...


1

I incline to distinguish historicism from determinism. In my view neither implies the other. Historicism As a historicist, I argued that human life was ineluctably historical, so explanations of ideas, texts, actions, and practices should rely on historical narratives, not appeals to formal classifications, correlations, systems, or models. (Mark ...


1

David Simpson writes of Albert Camus: [my emphasis] Camus is often classified as an existentialist writer, and it is easy to see why. Affinities with Kierkegaard and Sartre are patent. He shares with these philosophers (and with the other major writers in the existentialist tradition, from Augustine and Pascal to Dostoyevsky and Nietzsche) an habitual and ...


1

I just wish to add a few thoughts and conceptualizations that came to my mind: As others have highlighted, there is a long debate (a) about determinism, and (b) about the definition of free will, and (c) if free will is compatible with determinism (this position being called 'compatibilism'). (a): Some answers here mentioned that at the micro-level ...


0

Your question is formulated from a quite narrow point of view: you assume that everything in nature works according to rules of the macroscopic universe ("chemically", "If any input causes with 0 uncertainty", "system"...). Following such fallacious assumption you consider that everything is predefined. So, you are minimally falling in the fallacies of ...


-1

Because we ignore to what extent we are deterministically programmed to take certain actions and we ignore to what extent consciousness plays a role in the plasticity of the brain. eg. "somebody with anger management issues decides to use therapy to shape their emotional responses. Somebody else with the same issues decides to kill people." ...


0

If we accept that neuro-chemistry largely explains cognitive function, deterministically, how can we be accountable? Thats a very big if and given the prevalence of law-courts, judging and judgements in our world and of freedom and liberty it might be better to to ask how can determinism exist. But of course that is just as silly a question as the first. ...


1

There isn't any difficulty with the truth or falsehood of statements about future events. Consider the two following statements: (1) There will be a sea battle tomorrow. (2) There will not be a sea battle tomorrow. Each of these statements is either true or false. If one is true, then the other is false. Obviously, we don't know the future, but ...


2

According to Andrea Iacona Aristotle in Chapter 9 of On Interpretations believed that the disjunction of a proposition about the future or its negation was true, but the individual disjuncts were neither true nor false. Consider these two statements: (1) There will be a sea battle tomorrow. (2) There will not be a sea battle tomorrow. Neither of ...


0

If we accept that neuro-chemistry largely explains cognitive function, deterministically, how can we be accountable? if you accept full determinism, the notion of accountabilty becomes void. To be accountable, a person must have choice of alternate decisions, if that choice is absent, you abandon accountability. Is determinism not inherently nihilist ...


0

I am not much of a philosopher but if I understand correctly you are saying two things: 1) There is no free will 2) If there is no free will, determinism means nihilism in the sense that if I have no choice then I am nothing. Discussion of these two: **1)**In the first one I agree, there is no free will and I think free will can even be defined. Of ...


1

tl;dr- Ethics modifies the behavior of ethical agents, regardless of determinism. For example, we can still judge a thief for their thievery to the betterment of society even if we choose to describe the thief's agency as 100% determined by physical processes. Analogy: In video games – players have free will; but, characters are determined by ...


Top 50 recent answers are included