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The question is what does the following sentence from John Dewey's Democracy and Eduction mean: Education is the laboratory in which philosophic distinctions become concrete and are tested. In that same paragraph Dewey warns that students of philosophy may see philosophy as relevant to philosophers alone: The student of philosophy "in itself" is ...


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The full paragraph containing the quote in question from Chapter 10 of Democracy and Education by John Dewey follows: This state of affairs explains many things in our historic educational traditions. It throws light upon the clash of aims manifested in different portions of the school system; the narrowly utilitarian character of most elementary ...


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Richard Field writes at the beginning of his article on Dewey: John Dewey was a leading proponent of the American school of thought known as pragmatism, a view that rejected the dualistic epistemology and metaphysics of modern philosophy in favor of a naturalistic approach that viewed knowledge as arising from an active adaptation of the human organism to ...


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The key term here is "indeterminate situation". Without a restriction on what counts as "indeterminate situation" the quoted definition is clearly far too inclusive. Russell's critisism relies on "a pile of bricks" being an example of an "indeterminate situation". I don't think Dewey would agree. Dewey's meaning seems to be quite specific, roughly meaning ...


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James and Dewey were students of Peirce. Peirce opposed their pragmatism to such a degree that he thought it necessary to term his original pragmatism "pragmaticism," distinguishing it from their simple positivist pragmatism, which is compatible with nominalism, as superior to it in three ways: …first, its retention of a purified philosophy; secondly, its ...


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John Dewey, according to Wikipedia, was "an atheist[55] and a secular humanist in his later life". Paul Tillich was a "Lutheran Protestant theologian". One can expect that there will be differences between them whatever the similarities. Here is Dewey's use of "supremely devoted" in A Common Faith, page 41-2: The question ...


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I will answer with a chapter which explicitly tackles the question of what educational aims are in Dewey: Waks, L. (2017). A Democratic Theory of Aims: On Chapter 8: Aims in Education. In L. Waks & A. English (Eds.), John Dewey's Democracy and Education: A Centennial Handbook (pp. 73-80). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. doi:10.1017/9781316492765....


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Dewey says that: a result is simply the outcome of an action. Example: sand blowing in the desert constantly has the result of shifted positions of sand. But this is neither an end nor an aim, because events are not done "in preparation" for other events (the requirement for an end), and events are not done with conscious anticipation and ...


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Dewey and participatory democracy - a caveat Westbook says repeatedly that Dewey favored "participatory democracy. " In a sense he did, but the term comes out of the student movement in the '60s and had a variety of meanings then. To apply it to Dewey seems both anachronistic and to add an unnecessary layer of undetermined meaning to a ...


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Although I do not have Sharon Kaye's text, hopefully the following texts may suggest why the fourth option is most likely not what Dewey would consider a tool to be. Elizabeth Anderson writes the following about John Dewey's ethics: Value judgments are tools for satisfactorily redirecting conduct when habits fail. As tools, they can be evaluated ...


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The idea of educating all ignorant members of society is not pragmatic. Dewey's statement "Democracy and the one, ultimate, ethical ideal of humanity are to my mind synonymous." is at odds with Unger's valued "global perspective" in that ignorant voters exist.


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