27

I think you may be mistaking the kind of critical questioning demanded by philosophy for a kind of cultural insensitivity. The two aren't the same--although of course some philosophers are culturally insensitive. Philosophy is about finding out the truth and philosophers use a variety of methods, methods from the natural and human sciences, as well as ...


18

I am of Indian ancestry but 3rd generation in America. I have been exposed to both East and Western philosophy/science in my family life but exposed to Western science due to my graduate school training. I identify far more with the Western approach culturally but I hope I can provide some insight. Cultural, academic, and scientific standards have shaped ...


16

Great question. This will be an incomplete and potentially unsatisfying answer, and I will be interested to see other answers, but here are five answers to start with: There is a historical-sociological sense in which Philosophy, narrowly construed, is a phenomenon of Greek culture and the cultures it influenced. It's a Greek word describing a distinctly ...


11

1) You are correct. Manu said caste is based on a person's own tendencies. Caste is a social custom, not a religious custom (Swami Vivekananda) Most parts of India follow local customs, not the laws of Manu (for example: brahmins in the south do not do animal sacrifice, Bengali brahmins do) 2) The Vedas are the eternal truths of God, not the written ...


11

There is such a thing as cultural chauvinism: I note for example, you are not asking why philosophy of the aborigines of Austranesia not represented. I take it, you are of Indian ancestry; and this is why you're asking about why it's under-represented. Turn this on its head; and you'll understand why Western philosophers appear to be unfair; because they ...


10

The quotation is from Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism—a monotheistic religion originating in the 15th century as an offshoot of Hinduism and Islam. Guru Nanak was a mystic, which, in a religious context, is one who advocates the practice of pursuing and has the knowledge to themselves achieve a personal relationship (or "one-ness") with God. Mysticism ...


9

Western philosophy has a long and broad tradition. It doesn't surprise me that in a first course in the West you would only be introduced to the major Western philosophers - but perhaps it is worth mentioning that there are other philosophical traditions out there which are worth looking at for their own intrinsic interest as well for the impact they have ...


9

SOCRATES VERSUS BUDDHA ON THE SOUL If Buddhism denies the existence of any continuing self or soul, this appears to conflict with Socrates' view of a continuing soul which is freed and released from the regions of the earth as from a prison. The soul continues to exist, Socrates says, but in radically different conditions. For Buddhism there is no soul to ...


8

There seems to be evidence, yet I have only been able to find indirect references: From Wikipedia: As a university-trained Catholic priest dedicated to astronomy, Copernicus was acquainted with the Sun-centered cosmos of the ancient Greek Aristarchus. [...] Copernicus cited Aristarchus and Philolaus in an early manuscript of his book which survives, ...


8

I'm not really sure where you are getting your info, but there are several problems in what you are saying. First, the claim "Philosophy has roots in both the eastern and the western world" has some issues or at least some important ambiguities. On the one hand, philosophy can be taken to refer to a specific endeavor of the Greeks in which case the rooting ...


8

This is one of the most crucial questions I have encountered on Philosophy.SE, and indicates an admirable consciousness about the structural bias in Western mainstream academia. It's a fact that while philosophy according to the Western narrative and experience is taught and studied almost all across the world, eastern wisdom/philosophies are much less ...


8

The search for truth and knowledge tolerates no restraints, no notion of the "sacred" and no "unquestionable" ideas. Western philosophers have questioned, among other things: Whether all of reality might be a simulation Whether anything except one's own mind even exists And those admittedly extreme viewpoints have been variously defended and attacked by ...


7

An alternate manner of approaching this question is to drill into the idiosyncratic manner that Abrahamic religions, and subsequently Occidental thought, has dealt with the purported problem of "Good and Evil(g/e)" The commonly understood conception of g/e, and the conception that is embedded in the texts of each religion has brought to bear a mentality ...


7

Amartya Sen addresses this question in good depth in his July 2010 essay for the New York Review of Books. Specifically, one of the notions he challenges is the insidious notion, brought up by well-meaning proponents (both Eastern and Western), that rationality is somehow a product of the West -- the corollary often being that it's not fair to impose Western ...


7

anatman is a concatanation of the privative an, meaning no or not, and atman, which is sometimes translated as soul or self, for example, Tagore named Gandhi mahatma meaning great (maha) soul (atma). However, the word soul, though having religous and sacred overtones, and relating to inner essence, is bound up with the Christian tradition which makes it for ...


7

Philosophy is in substantial part an exercise in learning from the history of thought, and throughout history many people who had a substantial impact on human thought also held a lot of beliefs that we now know (with a high degree of confidence) are wrong. Mostly it's science that has pointed out just how wrong the wrong parts are, but not exclusively. So ...


6

This is a large question, and can be approached several ways. First, at the broad level-- there is a widespread misconception that Western philosophy is rational and Eastern philosophy is mystical. This is false, but it is false in an interesting way: there is a fascinating book on the subject by Thomas McEvilley called The Shape of Ancient Thought: ...


6

Rationality in philosophy is the exercise of reason, reason being sound judgment (having some basis or justification for a belief). In all philosophies east or west, north or south, the basic concept of rationality is the same — everyone wants to be confident that there is some justification for their beliefs, otherwise in any society we would be cast out as ...


6

I think the writer is quoting the original text from the chapter "Essentials for Nurturing Life"" (in Chinese 養生主). At the beginning of this chapter, Zhuangzi says (since I don't have an English translation, I just put my literal translation and some understanding here) our life is limited, and knowledge isn't. If we get ourselves addicted into knowledge (...


6

Jung once floated a theory on Thales that the easiest thing to imagine all things made of is water because it is one of the pure substances we see in all three forms in a non-technological culture. Seeing ice or mist become water and realizing that they are the same substance is a major, striking scientific development that has spoken profoundly to ...


6

I only know a bit of what I've looked up on my own, but perhaps I can get you started, although my approach is sure to be skewed as compared to most others, and I may make glaring errors. I don't know if you are deshi; if so, you may be able to correct some of my misunderstandings concerning traditional practices on your own. Also, I am giving a sort of ...


5

This is one of the Fourteen Unanswered Questions. There is a Buddhist Creation Myth told in the Aggañña Sutta, but it is clearly a satire and is not taken seriously.


5

I'm an Indian and a Hindu and have read many Indian spiritual texts. With this context, I too would like to interpret the quote piece by piece: Let no man in the world live in delusion. This part probably refers to the Indian concept of Maaya - that the material world and its desires constitute a delusion that we should overcome, in order to find ...


5

Eastern philosophy is less studied in the West for the same reasons that Western philosophy is less studied in the East; you study what your father taught you (personally or as a culture) studied and he was taught what his father taught him. University departments are broken up into taxonomic systems that reflect the way the Western mind has been looking ...


5

Taoism is quite different from christianity, specially in morality and ethics (i.e. considering what is right and what is wrong), since: In Taoism every concept appears immediately with their opposite. In christianity, there is God, and be apart from God. Most of the concepts in the Bible arise from the idea of being apart from God. An example of this is ...


5

It is not taboo, it is just generally outside of the sphere of understanding of most Westerners, including those that study philosophy. The problem arises for the same reasons that clashes occur between Western culture and other cultures. Western culture 'universalism' gives Westerners the underlying belief by their very upbringing and thinking--whether you ...


4

Chinese philosophy generally will cover first the pre-Qin era schools: legalism, mohism, Confucianism-1 (meaning Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi) and Taoism. Some of the key ideas to consider are the meaning of Dao (道), the role of different virtues such as Ren (仁) and Li "rite" (禮), the relationship between what later became codified as distinct schools, and ...


4

I think there are several contributing reasons (as someone who has both published and taught both canonical Western philosophy and Chinese philosophy). The style of classical Chinese texts does not lend themselves to the same sort of classroom experience. It's a pain in the butt having to explain some of the most important passages in Chinese philosophy ...


4

Speaking from personal experience as a Christian with Taoist sympathies, although it's far from a mainstream line of thought in either Christian or Taoist circles, the cause of reconciling the two is well known, and has been taken up by a number of different thinkers. Part of the motivation may come from the fact that Taoism is largely non-theistic, which ...


4

Epistemology in Indian philosophy is divided into six pramanas (proof or rather, and more correctly given the association proof has in Western Rationalism as being orientated to mathematics - the means towards true knowledge). These are: Pratyaksa - Perception Anumana - Inference Upamana - Analogy Arthapatti - Hypothesis Anupalabdi - ...


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