21

Depends on your interests, on what you are already familiar with, and what style you like to read. I would say that unless you have a specific interest or know basics then starting with a general introduction is just fine. There are multiple. Some examples are: Blackburn's Think Russell's The Problems of Philosophy Nagel's What does it all mean? The latter ...


17

Great question. This will be an incomplete and potentially unsatisfying answer, and I will be interested to see other answers, but here are five answers to start with: There is a historical-sociological sense in which Philosophy, narrowly construed, is a phenomenon of Greek culture and the cultures it influenced. It's a Greek word describing a distinctly ...


13

Sophie's World: A Novel About the History of Philosophy (Worldcat link) might be better for an 11 or 12 year-old, but is worth mentioning. It follows a 14 year-old girl who starts wondering about philosophical questions and engages with a philosophy teacher to discuss in an accessible way ideas from early modern philosophy.


11

When I was young I really enjoyed the books of logician Raymond Smullyan, who wrote several books of logic puzzles held together with minimal but amusing narratives, including The Lady or the Tiger? and To Mock a Mockingbird. They are very accessible, even to a young audience, but cover some surprisingly sophisticated and advanced concepts. Lewis Carroll ...


8

A second major in Mathematics could definitely be an asset for applying to graduate school in Philosophy, but whether it is, or how much it could be, depends a great deal on what specialization you suggest you are likely to pursue in your application statements. If you anticipate specializing in (a) an area where mathematical methods are used (e.g. logic, ...


7

This is a significant question. On the one hand, each of us is embedded in the culture of a particular time and place, but on the other, our expectation of philosophers is that they stand outside the framework of ideas and assumptions that entraps everyone else. There's the added wrinkle that it isn't always clear how a philosopher's ideas will actually be ...


7

Welcome xaratustra. I think you over-rate the importance of originality in philosophy. There are genuinely original papers such as Russell's 1905 paper, 'On Denoting', but a good philosophy paper can have many virtues besides originality. For instance, a paper might reduce ideas and arguments to coherence. A service is done by organising disconnected ...


6

The general answer is "no, there are no special prerequisites for philosophy." However, Philosophy is a topic which rewards those who are willing to accept challenges to their deepest held beliefs, and to those who are willing to view a topic from someone else's point of view. I cannot speak to you as a person, but I can speak to the particular set of ...


6

Let me question your question briefly, then reassure you, then try to answer it. Precious few experts in philosophy lack what they and other people would consider serious gaps. Many, many philosophy professors are not all that familiar with material that's taught by others even in fairly introductory-level courses. This is far from unique to Philosophy. You ...


6

I think Orwell's Animal Farm can also be a good read for 9 year old. Its not strictly philosophical but still worth a read for every smart kid ( and adult ), I think.


6

Plato and Pythagoras There is evidence that the Platonic Academy was modelled on Pythagoras's school in Sicily : The Academy (probably modeled after Pythagoras's school in Sicily) was established as a quasi-religious association (or thiasos), a "brotherhood dedicated to the muses" and charac- terized by reciprocity, equality, and friendship (...


6

The question is what does the following sentence from John Dewey's Democracy and Eduction mean: Education is the laboratory in which philosophic distinctions become concrete and are tested. In that same paragraph Dewey warns that students of philosophy may see philosophy as relevant to philosophers alone: The student of philosophy "in itself" is ...


6

Rhetoric is closely connected to Sophism and Sophistry Rhetoric is usually described as an art of persuading (some audience about something). It is not particularly interested with truth, only with appearance of it. Rhetoric appeals not only to the reason, but much more to the emotions. In this regards, rhetoric is close to the psychology - many good ...


5

I don't want to generalize, but when i was 9 years old (also a fan of logic) i loved reading fantasy novels. I'm 19 now and i don't claim to have any knowledge on how to bring up a child, but maybe it's a good idea to buy him a book he enjoys to read. What i would suggest (if he likes fantasy): Artemis Fowl it's a book/series about a teen super genius who ...


5

I think there are several contributing reasons (as someone who has both published and taught both canonical Western philosophy and Chinese philosophy). The style of classical Chinese texts does not lend themselves to the same sort of classroom experience. It's a pain in the butt having to explain some of the most important passages in Chinese philosophy ...


5

I am aware of very few places where you could simultaneously pursue a masters in math and the "professional pursuit of philosophy." You would need to research programs specifically. But most of these are not going to be targeted at the MS/MA level. Instead, what I would suggest is to do your masters in math and take a course or two in philosophy -- outside ...


4

Some points regarding philosophical texts: Topic and focus of the question (writing only on the question and actually answering it, no digressions and unnecessary remarks) Handling of concepts (definitions and descriminations made explicit, interdependencies shown) Showing insight into current discourse (paraphrasing and referencing at least the most ...


4

Will Durant's "The Story of Philosophy" paves a great historical path through philosophy and does a very nice job of entertaining various concepts and then criticizing those same concepts in the later part of each chapter. One thing I loved about the book is that once I had a nice understanding of the course of philosophical history, I could then "zoom in" ...


4

Turning the objection against itself It's a nice twist that philosophy gave us utilitarianism, which is the basis of your question. And even if it hadn't, the question whether an activity or inquiry is answerable to 'usefulness' and only to usefulness is itself a philosophical question. (What other type of question could it be ?) Some suppose that philosophy ...


3

"Cultivating an interest in any subject or discipline is more a part of chance than necessity (what we would like to do for our children)." This is what my dad says anyway. I began my own studies by reading through an old edition (1987) of World Book Encyclopedia. It's really fun even now! My dad picked up the entire set for $10.00 at some thrift shop. ...


3

You need some knowledge of medieval philosophy and of medieval/Early Modern European history. It may help to supplement the reading of the book with some comment/critical books : Harold Bloom (editor), Dante Alighieri (2nd_Edition 2011) Rachel Jacoff (editor), The Cambridge Companion to Dante (2nd ed 2007) Patrick Boyde, Dante Philomythes and Philosopher : ...


3

Whether or not teaching mathematics to children helps to spread the idea of equality is an empirical, psychological, maybe educational question. It is not a question of philosophy. That said, why should mathematics help with equality? There will be a whole bunch of counterexamples, crazy murderer that are genius at math, early civilizations (most notably ...


3

I believe that the majority of mathematicians would take this view : A mathematical object is a set of abstract entities together with the relationships between them. According to this view, the word property is synonymous with relation. For example, the set of integers is a mathematical object. The only properties of integers are those present in the ...


3

For one answer, consider that you wrote all of that without providing a definition of "chunk." How can I algorithmically process your question to generate an answer without a clear definition of "chunk?" For a second answer, consider thoughts of love. People say "When you're in love, you'll know it." Any attempt to think about love from that mindset ...


3

This is the opinion of 'mathematician' (working on my mathematics PhD) who has studied a fair amount of (analytic) philosophy. I find it interesting that you feel this way, for I feel the very opposite is true. To my mind, philosophy seems to be just as difficult, if not considerably more difficult, precisely because of the high learning barrier and the fact ...


3

How about Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder. In it, you follow the main character Sophie, an adolescent who discovers philosophy through (paper) mails from a mysterious stranger. It is readable as an adult (i.e., not adolescency-cringey) and gives a good feeling for what the different ages were thinking. Also, entertaining enough to read. Afterwards, you ...


3

Philosophize This! podcast is a great introduction to the subject. Plus, you can listen to it while you are driving, working out, or doing any other monotonous task. Find a friend to listen to it with you and you could discuss the episodes! He has over 100 half n hour episodes, geared toward a beginner(without all the jargon and nuance) but definitively ...


3

The full paragraph containing the quote in question from Chapter 10 of Democracy and Education by John Dewey follows: This state of affairs explains many things in our historic educational traditions. It throws light upon the clash of aims manifested in different portions of the school system; the narrowly utilitarian character of most elementary ...


3

According to Wikipedia Ivan Illich opposed "institutionalized education" or "compulsory mass education", but he favored "self-directed education, supported by intentional social relations, in fluid informal arrangements". It may be a misrepresentation of his position to simply say he was "so opposed to schools" unless one clarifies that what he was opposed ...


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