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As @Geremia pointed out, finding axioms for the mathematical portion of physics has certainly been proposed, and undoubtedly attempts have been made. However: Even if such axioms could be found, sufficient to cover all known phenomenae, and amenable as a basis for the mathematical portion of physics, there would still be the entirely separate issue of ...


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Yes, axioms do exist. Underlying the processes of science are several philosophical assumptions--aka 'axioms' or 'first principles.' They are necessary for making any and all inferences from scientific data, and really, even for the application and method of science itself. We take them for granted--like most philosophy--and don't think about them much. They ...


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Occam's razor and falsifiability are both tools that have been widely adopted by propagandists. Which isn't to say they don't have any value, but they're so widely misused as to make them very suspect. I homed in on them while study conspiracy science. For example, people will say "The conspiracy theory is more complex than the official narrative, therefore,...


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One of the greatest breakthroughs in psychology is the MBTI, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. It shows that humanity consists of 16 distinct personalities, each with a pattern unlike the rest. You can expect 16 different answers that will intersect without compromising on themselves. To rephrase, 16 different snowflakes for every moral issue. Let’s start with ...


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Central question When Berkeley roundly dismisses the existence of 'abstract' ideas and pronounces that 'to be is to be perceived', is he implying anything more than that the world is an illusion? I don't think Berkeley believes or implies that 'the world is an illusion'. It is perfectly real - only it is not real as a material object, or set of material ...


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These Insights are not new, those who are meditative enough are able to perceive them. The ancient texts spoke about them; So deep, so pure, so still It has been this way forever You may ask, “Whose child is it?”- but I cannot say This child was here before the Great Ancestor - Dao De Ching That which is nonexistent can never come into being, that which is ...


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Who made the last conscious choice to act, knowing the likely outcome of his/her action? Does Charlie reasonably believe that his bullets will continue to miss Bob because he doesn't know about Alice? Does he know that someone might possibly block the safe path without him seeing it, and is therefore acting with reckless disregard for Bob's life? Did ...


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When people talk about 'founding' a state, they mean two things: Defining a certain territorial region that the 'state' will have sovereign authority to administer and control. Creating a body of institutions — offices, laws, systems — by which that region will be administered and controlled. That can amount to anything, honestly. A few decades back there ...


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I would say a categorisation is always made from a point-of-view. In the end all things belong in the category 'everything' and how we divide them up after this is up to us. It all depends which features and properties of the object matter to us. Some we ignore, some we use as the basis of categorisation. This would not mean that categories are arbitrary,...


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What is the value of a formal model in science? To some extent, this question is the basis of the divide between realist and anti-realist positions in the philosophy of science, so it's a very broad question with a lot of metaphysical territory to cover; however, some gross oversimplifications follow: First, from Mary Hesse, on page 300 of Blackwell's A ...


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First a point that may or may not be clear: we care about the 'target system'; the model is in many ways incidental. The target system is some system or process that exists in the real world, outside (as Wittgenstein would put it) the limits of our language. We create models to capture elements of that system in language (including the language of ...


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Since the questioner mentions the Philosophy of Science, here is a response to 'What role does Philosophy play in the realm of Science?' Your creating models conundrum gives voice to the concern that science performed for its own sake, with no limits or guidelines is problematic. At the moment there does not appear to be any systematic, science based ...


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Apparently, there is a text by Popper on TV. The french translation is " La lélévision, un danger pour la démocratie". I cannot find the original reference in english. Also, Boudieu ( a sociologist with a philosophical academic background) : https://monoskop.org/images/1/13/Bourdieu_Pierre_On_Television.pdf


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Suppose that M is a formal (mathematical) model and T is a target system. Then interpretation can be thought of as a map I:M->T. You can think of M and I as of "a picture" of T. The picture (as usual) can be to some degree accurate. Nevertheless its accuracy can be verified by comparing M via I with the target system T. Now suppose that you verified your ...


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A proposition is analytic iff the concept of the predicate is contained in the concept of the subject ( so that negating the predicate of the subject amounts to a contradiction). The concept of John expresses the essence of John. By essence, one can arguably understand here : the set of all necessary and sufficient conditions in order an x to be identical ...


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In Kantian terms, you can't ask if it's just analytic or synthetic, but also a priori or empirical. "I feel happy," is usually empirical, but in the unusual interpretation you're offering it would be perhaps a priori, where apriority as itself subjective allows the case to go through like so.


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