Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

New answers tagged

0

Examining Wittgenstein's Tratatus Logico-Philosophicus in both German and English, the words "synthetic(al)" and "posteriori" do not appear when I searched for them. However, "a priori" often did. The word "analytical" was mentioned in 6.11. Wittgenstein mentioned Kant once regarding the problem of the left and right hand in 6.36111. Wikipedia describes ...


2

I think the OP misunderstood the guidebook. The OP said According to (12) it might seem that the distribution of prime numbers can only be a matter of knowledge, never of opinion. Obviously that is false. Is the distribution of prime numbers not fully understood and is that the reason why the quote says that one can only have an opinion? The ...


0

Kant's view and Locke's view on the foundations of epistemology are reconciled by the discoveries of Darwin. When Locke said that a human was born with a blank slate of a mind, he should have said that the first life started with a blank mind. All life acquired all its knowledge of the world through sense experience--but for a long time it didn't inscribe (...


5

I will make several suggestions, although I am not certain that I interpret the question as intended. The strongest case (arguably) for philosophical foundations to epistemology in modern times, including the idea that positive sciences require such an inquiry into their foundations to function properly, was emphatically made by Husserl throughout his life. ...


0

Does physicalism include epistemological principles that make it impossible to disprove by its own standard ? No, yes, and maybe. No. Physicalism is not a theory of epistemology. It is commonly associated with correspondence theory, but they are technically separate things. So any question of the form "Does physicalism include epistemological principles ...


2

1) Depth information D'Agostino's Philosophy of Mathematical Information explicitly disclaims defining information. He takes "the operational view that, whatever its nature may be, information manifests itself in an agent’s disposition to answer questions". This can be quantified (following Carnap-Bar Hillel, and more generally, Hintikka) by introducing ...


0

Here's a brief definition of Quine's undetermination that I found online: "Underdetermination is a thesis explaining that for any scientifically based theory there will always be at least one rival theory that is also supported by the evidence given, and that that theory can also be logically maintained in the face of any new evidence." Source: https://www....


1

From an initial analysis, your acquaintance is essentially putting forward a hypothesis about axiom selection; underlying this is the following premise: What I know depends on what axioms I take. I'm interpreting this premise as a claim that we as humans are doxastically axiomatic, by which I mean that it works something like knowledge based systems (KBS); ...


2

I'd say inanimate objects are neither evil nor good. They just are: the mean is neutral, or 'lack of morality'. There is no morality in inanimate things, because they have no will (although someone better versed in philosophy might challenge me on that last part). To conclude that anything that is not evil must be good is a false dilemma - something is not ...


1

A related idea in epistemology is this. Suppose you want to believe that X is true. Is there any strategy that could guarantee that you would be rational to believe that X is true, regardless of what X is? Here's an example. Suppose I want to believe that people like me, whether or not it is true. But I also want to believe it rationally, in a way that is ...


2

Short answer You helpfully clarified in the comments that your question is about using the rhetorical strategy of cherry-picking. Since it involves the conscious use of an informal fallacy and leads to unsound reasoning, I would call it a form of disingenuous or consciously fallacious reasoning. Long answer Since we are in the sphere of how to convince a ...


-1

Well, nobody here has challenged my belief/assertion/bit of philosophy about justification and truth: I think that truth is irrelevant to justification. It seems clear that historical (Pre-Kantian) methods have failed to produce a current consensus that any justification is adequate in theory or in practice to produce objective certainty about anybody's ...


0

Subsistence Meinong's concept of 'subsistence' is relevant here. The following is a brief explication: According to Meinong's ... theory, there are two modes of being, existence and subsistence. Concrete objects that have being exist, and abs- tract objects that have being subsist. Concrete objects that do not exist have no sort of being ...


2

It always comes down to semantics with these problems. We have to be very careful with how we define the words surrounding "knowledge," because its very easy to be inconsistent. If one accepts the most popular philosophical definition of knowledge, "Justified True Belief," then justification is an important part of the puzzle. If, at the age of 6, you ...


0

Yes. Possibilities. David Lewis in "On the Plurality of Worlds" argues that all possible worlds somehow actually exist though I don't think most contemporary philosophers buy into this idea. Lewis does allow for what he calls a kind of "ersatz" existence for possibilities (if you want to talk about possible worlds without making existential claims). But here'...


0

In my experience, subjective and objective have been thought to be mutually exclusive, but they're no longer being applied in contemporary scholarship as absolutely distinct from each other. In philosophy definitions vary, and technical concepts get transformed over time. Have you read this article on objectivity? It contains this: Despite plausible ways ...


1

As a preparatory to his "Ethics Demonstrated in the Geometric Method", Spinoza produced a short Treatise titled "On the Improvement of the Understanding". It is often referred to as the TIE for Tractatus Emendatione Intellectus. It is brief because it is unfinished, [43 pages]. In it he maintained that before undergoing an Epistemological and Metaphysical ...


Top 50 recent answers are included