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From Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy (of the Event) §14, Philosophy and worldview A "worldview" sets experience on a definite path and within a determinate range, and this in such a broad way that it does not allow the worldview itself to come into question; the worldview thereby narrows and thwarts genuine experience. From the standpoint ...


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The origin of the term weltanschaung in philosophy goes to Kant, and was developed further by Hegel, and in their work led to a subtle divergence from the English cognate 'worldview'. I would look to Kuhn's paradigms, for an example of how models of reality shape what we experience, with changing our model of reality in ways discontinuous with the old model, ...


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You believe in such a thing cause you value it. Even though you can’t see it, you can feel it. You can’t see oxygen, but you BELIEVE you are inhaling it with each breath you take if not not you know you’ll die! You can’t see the wind, but you can feel it. You can’t see Wifi, but you Believe it exist cause you either have bars on your phone for indication or ...


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I will go for Intuition if we talk about a specific truth but at an ontological level it depends on whether you believe there is truth or not. If you do then your belief is faith and if you don't then you are a nihilist. To sum it up it all depends on truth and what it means to us or you.


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The rule-circular reliability paradigm is functional-pragmatic; we can do things with it. Obviously we could invoke other rule-circular paradigms and apply them self-consistently, and obviously we should give them 'fair treatment' for analytical purposes. But unless we can do something with them (aside from being argumentative) why should we hang onto them? ...


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Epistemology is the study of knowledge, which is often interpreted as a question of how we get from the 'unknown' to the 'known'. But it's more subtle than that, philosophically speaking. Espistemology also deals with questions like: What does it mean to 'know'? Do we 'know' anything at all? Is there anything we can never 'know'? Is 'knowledge' based in ...


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You should try searching this site on a topic you are interested in. I found: Ethics, axiology, and decision theory Has anyone claimed that no decision is inherently better or more rational than any other decision? Overcoming procrastination & the fear of making decision. were on the first page. Choosing a career is so complex that chaos theory has ...


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Faith: conviction without proof Epistemology: study of knowledge So, no. Study is NOT conviction. They are not even similar. But it seems the intention of your question is this: Is faith a form of philosophy? And in this case, the answer is yes. Philosophy can be said to be the quest for truth, so, philosophy would be the search of knowledge, which goal is ...


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Modern physicalists generally do not argue any more that physicalism is actually monisitc. Here are three references published in the last two decades, that all agree that there are non-physical things in our universe: https://www.amazon.com/Physicalism-Problems-Philosophy-Daniel-Stoljar/dp/0415452627/ref=sr_1_1?crid=32B84H7IR1HAM&keywords=physicalism+...


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I suggest that the proposal is unsound. While it may or may not be the case that one must decide to make a decision, the same applies to a non-free will decision and so the paradox in fact says nothing about free will. Given that we clearly can make decisions, whether or not by free will, it follows that the infinite recursion proposal must be incorrect.


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The first (and perhaps un-obvious) point I'll make is that the advances in communication technology have impacted philosophy as much as anything else in society. In brief, modern communication technologies have done some good increasing the production and availability of good, interesting, sophisticated philosophy, but it has exponentially increased the ...


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I always read "The Happiness of Fish" with Schopenhauer in the back of my mind. Obviously the “happiness” experienced by a human or a fish must mean something radically different. But what we do have in common is the will to exist (persist) and the level in which we succeed in doing this. I don’t think Zhuangzi is claiming that he knows exactly ...


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