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Welcome Jason P Salinger Prima facie the first and most readily defensible moral principle or ethical datum here is that the lost money should be returned to the owner in a kind of restorative justice. This is very clear in a case where e.g. someone just ahead has dropped a $50 bill. I pick up the money, catch up the person, explain the situation, and hand ...


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At least two approaches offer themselves to this question. The first is to produce a list of one right to know after another. We list our intuitions or what there is a broad consensus about in our society. Your examples fit this approach. Much may be said for it. Against it is the danger that we finish up with a disconnected heap of rights to know without ...


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The issue you are not considering is that the act of 'observation' carries two distinct modes in language: description and ascription. Description is a passive mode that merely notes and relates a characteristic of the observed: e.g., "John has hands and feet". Ascription is an active mode that imports causal relationships into a characteristic of the ...


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If any morally good action is not spontaneous, is it truly morally good? I give to a certain charity in a regular basis - it's part of my written budget, and I have auto-pay set up with my bank for it. I selected that charity in particular after considering what causes are important to me and researching the charity in question to make sure that they were ...


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We don't. Sometimes such privileging leads to outcomes that are socially, at least to philosophers, probably bad. Consider a city investment policy common in the United States: tax breaks are given to entice developers to build condominiums that only a small percentage of wage earners in City X can afford to live in. Tax revenues may go up in the short-term, ...


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You could ask, "did someone drop this (money)?" If no one says yes, and you consider that to have been a concerted effort, you could argue that you are morally justified in taking the money. Alternatively, you could give the money to the authorities (e.g. lost and found, an administrative office, or the police), saying who you are and where you found it. ...


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Yes you should care because after 5 minutes you are already a different person who just happens now to have a twin sister whom people are talking about murdering. In the "Many Worlds" interpretation of QM this happens all the time anyway. Most of us don't worry too much about what happens to the versions of us in all the parallel universes because we've got ...


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Welcome Arlo Curley A good, stimulating question though I doubt if it can be answered except against the background of assumptions about the nature and character of God's activity. On which, I might add, there is not likely to be consensus even among Christians. Also I am going to suggest that the question is unanswerable non-circularly. In other words, ...


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Your question might be a duplicate...the first paragraph of my reply is virtually identical to a reply I posted to another question recently, though I can't remember what it was. Your question evokes the timeless debate made famous by Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Rousseau had a very romanticized view of Nature, while Hobbes thought people living ...


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I have wondered this too, and with a skeptical lens I have found that most people who answer this use anecdotal evidence to support their conclusions. A vague term that you are using in your question is "measuring human happiness". The most common way that researchers assess happiness is through self-reports, which can be misleading. An interesting case I ...


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Practicality states that one should first help himself/herself before they can help others. If I swim to my friend that will increase my chance to survive but on the other hand decrease the chance of survival for others. This is the survival instinct of all living beings. By the double side effect - I am not having any intention of harming any other human ...


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Most of what is regurgitated here is false, including that Camus was an existentialist who who believed in free will. He did not believe in free will, and The Fall is partly a condemnation of Sartre. The book describes a man who had a life similar to Camus', then, after a tragic moment which makes him feel guilty of inaction, begins to reflect on his entire ...


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My quick answer is that I don't think the doctrine of double effect is inconsistent, whether this means that its formulation involves an inconsistency or that there are inconsistent results when the doctrine is applied to different cases. The concession I do make is that 'The fact that a harm was brought about as a merely foreseen side effect of pursuing a ...


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Christian theology kind of specialises in this. We have a cognitive bias to believe we are good, we are the positive standard, and do things for the right reasons – and that is often extended to things like our ends justify our means, it's everyone else's means that are intrinsically or categorically immoral. The Christian perspective is to accept we are ...


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In perfectionist ethics, I am inclined to think, the difference beween self- and other regarding duties is not a basic or even a particularly significant divide. Perfectionist ethics centres on the excellence of which we are capable. This excellence will focus on our natural and essential capacities, whatever they might be; and will not contain as an ...


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Since there is no argument in 'power must be evil' or in 'Power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely', both of which are only claims, neither can be fallacious (if no argument, then no fallacious or logically erroneous argument). 'Power corrupts', by the way, derives from Lord Acton, who said: "Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts ...


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