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49 votes

Are protests in a democracy ethical?

In a democracy, would this be ethical? I think not, because if then they'd have to change it by voting and through the process. Before any vote, campaigning happens where each small group or person ...
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20 votes

Are protests in a democracy ethical?

It seems you are assuming the laws of any given population always mirror the ethical views of that population, but that is never totally true, in fact it's most often not even remotely true. In my ...
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8 votes
Accepted

Is this spreading a lie considered lying?

As some of the comments allude to, a lie is generally considered a communication with an intent to deceive. WP uses this definition: A lie is an assertion that is believed to be false, typically used ...
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6 votes

Are protests in a democracy ethical?

Protests happen for various reasons and the number of people participating is not always indicative of the actual appeal of the central issue of the protest. People also have various reasons for not ...
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5 votes

Are protests in a democracy ethical?

Attempts to decide what is ethical or unethical can be quite difficult. Kant spilled a lot of ink trying to lay out a system for establishing the categorical imperative of his deontological framework. ...
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4 votes

Can hatred and retribution be justified and rationalized without free will?

If free will is absent because of determinism, hatred and retribution - when they occur - occur inevitably. Any rationalisation and/or justification which takes place is also inevitable. So, yes, ...
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4 votes

Can emotions be logical? And can logic and emotion co-exist?

Here's a related discussion, in which my answer points out 'pure reason' cannot provide motivations, or values The illogical nature of want/motivation and its effects on free will One of the primary ...
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  • 9,992
3 votes

Can hatred and retribution be justified and rationalized without free will?

Clearly anger at the weather is pointless, but retribution against a (seemingly) self-aware individual may have the effect of changing the future behaviour of that individual, or those associated with ...
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  • 457
3 votes

Are protests in a democracy ethical?

Taken absolutely, democracy means that every public policy should be determined by the preferences of the majority on each particular issue. In other words, each policy issue should follow the ...
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3 votes

Are protests in a democracy ethical?

Protesting = speech (Roughly speaking.) So yes, protesting is compatible* with democracy and doesn't in principle violate any democratic principles (assuming you consider the same to be true about ...
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2 votes

Are protests in a democracy ethical?

The initial question is very interesting to ponder about but the way you boil protests down here is lacking in nuance. One point I would like to particullarly point out is this. ...in reality what is ...
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  • 131
2 votes

How to explain value and goodness of things without resorting to Hedonism?

Hedonism as a philosophy suffers from a common confusion: people often mistake the metric for the thing being measured. While pleasure can be a goal in itself, leading to a kind of dissipated pleasure-...
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2 votes

Are protests in a democracy ethical?

However, if one really thinks about it, in reality what is happening is a small group of people showing some sort of negative feedback to the whole population and system which doesn't follow their ...
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2 votes

Are protests in a democracy ethical?

I mean that depends highly on how you protest and what that protest is meant to accomplish. Like what you seem to have in mind is that a minority of protestors forces the government to do something in ...
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  • 303
2 votes

"You never know until you try"?

You kinda have to define what you mean by "you (never) know" in that statement. Like if you go to the abstract logic then there are things that you can know without trying them. If you go to ...
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  • 303
2 votes
Accepted

Ethical evaluation of outcomes vs actions

The terms normative ethics and meta-ethics can be slippery at times. However, in general both 1 and 2 that you have listed would fall more into the normative ethics side of things. To answer your ...
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  • 189
2 votes

Can hatred and retribution be justified and rationalized without free will?

I mean at the risk of either playing captain obvious or saying something really stupid. But isn't he defeating his own statement? Like if you were to accept determinism and reject a free will and a ...
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  • 303
2 votes

Can emotions be logical? And can logic and emotion co-exist?

It is possible that emotions, like beliefs, are suspicious entities, where the grounds for holding them suspect are along the lines of eliminative materialism. "Syntactically," we might pair ...
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2 votes

Can emotions be logical? And can logic and emotion co-exist?

Can emotions be logical? Emotions may be predictable via logic. They might emerge in predictable ways. For example: John is usually saddened by suffering, particularly by the suffering of people he ...
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2 votes

Can someone be held responsible for an immoral action they have no memory of?

All that matters is whether the act was deliberate at the time it was implemented. This is what it means to be held accountable for something then and there. If later the memory of it is lost is ...
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  • 543
1 vote

Can emotions be logical? And can logic and emotion co-exist?

** Can emotions be logical? And can logic and emotions co-exist? ** This question is more likely part of epistemology. The emotion must bear some rational relationship to a perceived threat or its ...
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  • 4,658
1 vote

"You never know until you try"?

Whether theft is wrong or not is irrelevant. You can truly never know what it is like to experience something until you have experienced it. I believe there are no limits to the underlying nature of ...
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1 vote

Ethical evaluation of outcomes vs actions

Roughly speaking, you describe the demarcation line between deontological and consequentialist ethics. Deontological ethics roughly evaluate an action by the primary reason the person had to do it ...
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1 vote

Can consent be retroactive and withdrawable?

I mean in terms of the concept, it's only really consent if it is present at every present moment. So if consent is given before an action and withdrawn right before or even during the action then it ...
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  • 303
1 vote

Isn't it is unethical that lawyers protect their client even after knowing the client is guilty, isn't its injustice to the true person?

According to an answer to this question: What does a lawyer do if they know for absolute certain that their client is guilty? Lawyers are not permitted to assist in perjury. E.g., allow the client to ...
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1 vote

Are protests in a democracy ethical?

When Europe had democracies that were barred to female voters, it was ethical for the women to demonstrate. It achieved a different result than a purely written protest. Protest is a basic right for ...
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1 vote

How to explain value and goodness of things without resorting to Hedonism?

The OP writes: "I do not believe that the ethical theory of hedonism represents the world in which we live truthfully, neither does it appeal to my common sense." What represents the world ...
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  • 3,574
1 vote

Argument for a social conception of objective morality

First, we'll start with some definitions, which will help us to elucidate some possible objections to this argument. I will consider an action to be "objectively moral" if it is indeed ...
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1 vote

What are the logical problems of solving the trolley problem with chance?

Isn't that just a convoluted way of saying you want to save more people? Also what do you mean by: That way, you make the chance of surviving per person the same. Because you don't. Previously with ...
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