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Here is a book I just found after doing a search for Wagner and Spinoza “Goethe, Nietzsche, Wagner: Their Spinozan Epics of Love and Power” by T.K. Seung. https://www.amazon.com/Goethe-Nietzsche-Wagner-Their-Spinozan-ebook/dp/B00ELMFQ4S Nietzsche was always learning from Wagner, whatever the ups and downs of their friendship. The reviews are interesting. I ...


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In Sartre's work entitled Existentialism Is a Humanism (1946), Sartre backed away from so radical a subjectivism by suggesting a version of Kant’s idea that moral judgments be applied universally. He does not reconcile this view with conflicting statements elsewhere in his writings, and it is doubtful whether it represents his final ethical position. I think ...


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Don't need to go far to describe the problem, which is purely conceptual. A fact is an observation performed in the past (or the present, which is just our short-term memory, that is, a recent past). Not in the future. A situation that will occur in the future can never be a fact, including the sun coming out tomorrow. It is highly probable, but it is not ...


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By definition, it is either true now or it is false now that the slide will be finished tomorrow. The fact that something is true doesn't imply that we know it is true. A fact is a state of affairs we know to be the case. It is certainly not the case that anyone would know for a fact that some slide will be finished tomorrow. We don't even know that there ...


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No, person B is stating a future contingent until the truth is actually determined. Some other statements about the future might arguably be facts though, like "the sun will rise at such time tomorrow". If person B says "I want to finish my slide tonight" that can be a fact, if it is actually true. What matters is if it's true or not. ...


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In all viable moral frameworks for everyday situations (that I can think of) a moral obligation is to be accountable for ones actions. And part of accountability is to create the necessary transparency, and acceptance of adequate consequences. In your special case the main question is whether you created a situation of insufficient transparency. Given that ...


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'It seems to me that if everyone refused to say when a monogamous relationship was over, refused to tell someone of their affairs, and so on, then no monogamous relationships could exist.' I don't see that the conclusion follows, because it takes no account of monogamous relationships that persist and are not over. 'If relationships of these sorts were never ...


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Yes Academia.com allows you to submit what appears to be papers but they don't have to be published. You can submit published ones also. You make a profile for yourself.


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I'm not a Kant scholar, but he clearly had a strong position in favor of monogamous marriage and against sexual license, which doesn't leave much room to justify infidelity. Here's a textbook chapter which explains: He objects to casual sex (by which he means sex outside of marriage), however consensual, on the grounds that it is degrading and objectifying ...


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I have witnessed a dying mother who sacrificed everything for her child’s future. Don’t tell me that wasn’t true altruism . There was no self involved in her deeds . These days every philosopher is guided by herd mentality and it is truly worrisome.


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We can know understand right from wrong the same way we understand anything else -- by coming up with a mental model for it. And in general, that model is as simple as "act in the best interests of others". It is just as obvious, however, that no one can be comfortable using it until they achieve a sufficiently deep understanding of themselves, ...


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The main reason which justifies punishment of evolved behaviours, is to impose a fitness cost upon harmful behaviours. It matters not whether the person is blameworthy for having been bestowed with such behaviour, or even whether they can change it under their own will. The behaviour will be under pressure to change and be weeded out simply by imposing the ...


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Many genes need to meet with the correct environment. FoxP2, 'the language gene', is known to trigger babbling during development. In wild cockatiels individuals may be assigned names, and have emergency calls, and flock calls that build cohesion and call to roost. But raised by humans, they mimic human speech & music. Like this. Gene and behaviour, in ...


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Ethics are rules for societal conduct. Being a part of society is not “natural”. You have to keep your primeval instincts of self preservation aside if you want to be a member of society. You have to be willing to think of the whole and therefore abide by the ethics. On the contrary, you can choose to not abide by ethics if you are willing to give up the ...


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Why did Aristotle claim we can't wish our friends be gods? Because we'd thereby lose a great good. Aristotle himself (Ethics bk. 8 ch. 7) poses the objection: From this a doubt arises that men do not perhaps wish their friends the greatest goods, for example, that they become gods; for then the friends will not benefit them. ὅθεν καὶ ἀπορεῖται, μή ποτ' οὐ ...


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Is religion necessary for the good life? It seems evident that there are religious and non-religious people who live in a way that could be considered good - in that their life does no harm and provides benefit to other people. In contrast, it seems there are also plenty of genuinely religious and non-religious people who do things that appear to be bad, in ...


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