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3 votes

Difference between mental states and mental events?

Well, the difference between a state and event (SEP) holds true for mental states and mental events. Events are essentially nebulous intervals of time associated with specific occurrences, facts, and ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.7k
3 votes

Can an accident be prevented?

Risk has to go somewhere. So while an accident might or might not be preventable, its risks can usually be transformed. That is, the failure of a transformed system will not kill a human being, for ...
Mark Andrews's user avatar
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2 votes

If nothing happens, does time still pass?

Ernst Mach and Julian Barbour suggest that time is our perception of change, and perhaps that's one of the best definitions of time I've found. The only physical fact lying under such definition is ...
RodolfoAP's user avatar
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2 votes

If nothing happens, does time still pass?

There's no contradiction between "time is something fundamental," a physics/metaphysics thesis, and "time is a concept invented to describe how we experience events," an epistemic/conceptual thesis. ...
Paul Torek's user avatar
2 votes

Can an accident be prevented?

We are dealing with an instance of equivocation here: if accident is defined as a purely chance event than it cannot be prevented by definition. Accident can however mean other things, notably in the ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
  • 1,565
2 votes

Are our intuitions about probability not wrong after all?

"If one puts the event of HHHHH into the class “sequence containing all heads and tails” and all other sequences into the class “sequence not containing only heads or tails”, then the HHHHH event ...
Dikran Marsupial's user avatar
2 votes

Are there events that are truly unique objectively? Or are these categories subjective?

I suspect your question might be closed on the grounds that it is too vague. All events can be considered objectively unique in the sense that they are specific instances. If I cough while typing ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Quid Accidit? Quid Non Accidit?

First of all, trivially in order to understand what it means for something to happen, we need to be able to distinguish what happens from what does not. It is the ability to distinguish these that ...
Bumble's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the probability of events that don’t seem clearly defined?

This question would get a much better answer if asked on the statistics SE rather than here. For the first question the coin event probably seems better defined because you are using a familiar ...
Dikran Marsupial's user avatar
1 vote

What is the probability of events that don’t seem clearly defined?

"Not well-defined" and "unknown" mean different things. If we want to know whether John will be on his bicycle on MacArthur street at 7pm, we need one of the following two: a ...
g s's user avatar
  • 6,199
1 vote

Is there such a thing as a unique prediction/guess?

I'm not sure the following is entirely relevant to your question (it's at least peripherally relevant, since any given thing is peripherally relevant to everything else), but: Implications for the [...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
1 vote

Problem with circumstances and transformations/events

everything that is in the initial state of affairs could seen as possibly determining or conditoning the transformation This is demonstrably false. The form will likely be filled out the same way ...
Brian Z's user avatar
  • 1,337
1 vote

Can an accident be prevented?

In the physical world there is no such thing as a causeless accident. Instead there is always a causal chain leading up to the point where the accident occurs. If we know the physics behind each ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
1 vote

If all things come to an end, then wouldn't all things coming to an end itself end?

The problem with this question is that all things do not come to an end. For example: integers, rational, irrationals - the lists of each never ends. If you recast the question as: All things that are ...
PRL75's user avatar
  • 165
1 vote

What qualifies as being 'part of' the state of affairs for an event?

From WP's article on state of affairs: In philosophy, a state of affairs (German: Sachverhalt), also known as a situation, is a way the actual world must be in order to make some given proposition ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.7k
1 vote

What are the characteristics of an event according to Whitehead?

Maybe it is useful to refer to Whitehead's scientific background. See Alfred North Whitehead The Principle of Relativity with Applications to Physical Science (1922), page 21: "Nature usually ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
1 vote

For Whitehead, is an event theoretical or ontological?

It is important to remember that Whitehead adjusted his understanding of event ontology into a process philosophy of actual "occasions." I disagree with Lewis Ford and others who subscribe ...
Paradox Lost's user avatar
  • 2,045
1 vote

If nothing happens, does time still pass?

Time, as we know it is a method of tracking events, the "time" we know is something that is defined by man, but something defined by man is not always created by them, "time" will always flow, without ...
Veraen's user avatar
  • 209
1 vote

If nothing happens, does time still pass?

The interval of a second is currently defined as exactly 9 192 631 770 cycles of a Caesium atomic clock. Furthermore the definition has changed several times. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second ...
christo183's user avatar
  • 2,467

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