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Is Anselm's argument supposed to be understood in terms of hyperintensionality?

From the linked article, hyperintensionality seems to violate the salva veritate principle based on logical equivalence. So the concept seesm to work against Anselm's ontological proof that apparently ...
Hudjefa's user avatar
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1 vote

Is the universe 'necessarily' contingent?

The other answers point out useful caveats to your assumptions but I think they could be usefully elaborated on. gs’s distinguishment of necessary1 and necessary2 is very useful. necessary1: ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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0 votes

Is the universe 'necessarily' contingent?

Contingency implies that something could be otherwise. But everything that “could be otherwise” is merely a figment of your imagination when you think about this closely. One can always imagine ...
Hart Lort's user avatar
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1 vote

Is the universe 'necessarily' contingent?

The idea you're interacting with is determinism, which is the position that the present logically implies exactly one specific past and exactly one specific future, or possibly eternalism, which is ...
g s's user avatar
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0 votes

Chicken or Egg. Does anything begin Or is the idea of start/first origin. A misunderstanding of language

It took a Belgian Catholic priest, Georges Lemaitre, to propose an expanding universe in 1927. Einstein in 1915 had added a term to his General Relativity equations to produce the steady-state ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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Chicken or Egg. Does anything begin Or is the idea of start/first origin. A misunderstanding of language

The question of the beginning or no-beginning of the universe is not a “misunderstanding of applied language”. The issue is more serious: Currently we lack the concepts to think about this question. ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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What is the difference in concrete things between being and existing, or is there none?

Paraphrasing OP: what exactly is it in things (for example, a person) that being has but existence does not? Heidegger distinguishes the 'subjective' existence of a person (the Being of Dasein) from ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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Are "finding the pain of existence unbearable" and "deciding that life is not worth living" the same?

In a) since things are happening in the mind, it's an internal state, not an external one. The mind may reflect external things, but the reflection is a personal experience. In b) you are basically ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
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What is the difference in concrete things between being and existing, or is there none?

The problem with which Russell and Meinong were dealing was the following kind of line-of-reasoning: For a description dr to be true of something A, A must exist. Suppose A doesn't exist. Then here d ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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What is the meaning of "meaning of life" and why do people seek it?

The purpose of life has a rather straightforward meaning. All human beans want to be happy in life. We are programmed for that. And the other side of this equation is finding your true purpose and ...
TheMatrix Equation-balance's user avatar
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What is the meaning of "meaning of life" and why do people seek it?

A human asks, what is the meaning of life, as well as many other similar questions, because he does not generate thoughts, but many other living organisms send thoughts to him, and these thoughts are ...
VALERIAN's user avatar
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