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(Note, I am more of a physicist than a philosopher) Particles not only have shape, they have two shapes! The first shape is the wave function of the particle. Quantum particles are spread out all over the universe, but they usually have places where they are more present than elsewhere. The shape of these places can be said to be the shape of the particle. ...


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Your argument does seem familiar but i cant put a name to it. I think it falls down though in that when we ask "what is the meaning of life?" the appeal is not to understand the fact of life, but to question whether doing one thing is any better than doing another. For example I could ask "What is the meaning of this political movement?" ...


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"Particle" is an idealization, as is "the shape of a particle". The current observational evidence is that electrons are pointlike, which technically means that in the set of interactions that involve electrons that have been observed, there are no observations that are inconsistent with the electron having an arbitrarily small geometric ...


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This is one of the reasons why we switched to quantum field theory. Instead of referring to individuated particles and waves otherwise operating in a quasi-void, we took this quasi-void to be the potential background for what we otherwise were describing as particles and waves, such that excitations of the fields correspond to those things. No more need to ...


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Our senses provide us knowledge, even in the absence of things. In your example, the "truth" or your understanding must change upon observing no attraction (assuming the prior truth was something like "all magnets attract no matter what"). This is because our senses are information channels. An information channel is at all times updating ...


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On a realist account, Truth and Falsehood exist even if nothing ever happens. It is by virtue of how the universe works (how it "is"). In other words, truth exists even if unactualized – this typically implies a variant of Platonism, or slightly milder positions. Consider an example: There is the first-ever instance of physical law X. Now, the ...


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Is there a philosophical framework within which the question of existence in general, and of matter in particular, does not arise? Can we address this question by proposing a philosophy of Nothingness? a philosophy that explores states of “non-existence.” Philosophy is often tasked with distinguishing non-existence from existence and the other way around. ...


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If by the problem of existence you mean specifically the question of "ultimate origins", then there are many philosophical frameworks that don't put emphasis on time and therefore are not concerned with such questions. If you are specifically searching for a worldview that you want to adopt that would rid you of such thoughts, I'd say that Zen ...


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