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What compels the existence of "life" when it essentially boils down to a mere arrangement of atoms and particles?

Life is whatever you make of it. You can take an utterly negative view that it is all pointless, or you can make the most of it. It is your personal choice. I personally find huge satisfaction in life....
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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0 votes

What's the reason to live in this life?

Given that your Sanskrit name suggests you are of Indian descent, and by using the term 'Charvaka', it appears you are familiar with Indian philosophy, I would, like @Dr.H, point you towards God, or ...
nir's user avatar
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0 votes

What's the reason to live in this life?

Your lamentations What will happen after this life ends? Imagine falling asleep without dreams and not waking up - this will be the state after your life ends. The process of dying can be ...
AnoE's user avatar
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1 vote

What's the reason to live in this life?

All through this question you are seeking for meaning as the source of your willingness to live, while stating feelings of confusion, fear, and frustration. I’d say you are looking in the wrong place. ...
Jano's user avatar
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9 votes

What's the reason to live in this life?

I would suggest talking to a professional counsellor if possible (are you a student? check your school). They will better understand your situation and be able to offer better advice. For some ...
BurnsBA's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

Quine is thinking that "everything exists" means the same as "everything is something", which he thinks should be translated into first-order logic as "for all x, there is y ...
Ben's user avatar
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0 votes

Proving God and believing only provable things

The two parts of your question ask for the importance of proof (part 1) and the ontological consequences of statements which are unproven (part 2). Part 1: The strategy to accept only results which ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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5 votes

What's the reason to live in this life?

Life can put us through changing tides, where first one thing looks important then another. My experience has been that the things that can survive any such transformations are, creativity and ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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6 votes

What's the reason to live in this life?

In Sex, Death and the Meaning of Life, biologist Richard Dawkins asks comedian and fellow non-believer Ricky Gervais, “So why does a 21st century British atheist get up in the morning?” Gervais ...
h_undatus's user avatar
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12 votes

What's the reason to live in this life?

If you want a reason to live, devote yourself to helping people less fortunate than you. To those people, your existence would then be an important, positive part of their lives, which should give ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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3 votes

What's the reason to live in this life?

To me the answer is obvious: Learn to understand first. That involves a) learning to piece together your own understanding and b) doing the actual work, piecing together the puzzle. It's not easy and ...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
2 votes

What's the reason to live in this life?

It looks as if you expect a general and definite answer to your question: What's the reason to live in this life? The history of philosophy and religion show that there is no general and definite ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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-1 votes

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

For these type of questions about existence I find the proponents of Eleatic Monism (like Parmenides) had the most impactful and easy to understand wisdom. It is easy for humans to talk/speak in a &...
J Kusin's user avatar
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2 votes

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

This has to be understood as a part of the linguistic turn, where classic philosophical problems were reconceptualized as problems of language. In this case, the fundamental question "What exists?...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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0 votes

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

Quine's position is motivated by two considerations. One is a very hard-headed and pragmatic approach to philosophy. Quine advocates a strongly empiricist approach to philosophy that is minimalistic ...
Bumble's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

According to your summary, Quine did not propose the answer "Everything there is" (which would be circular), but rather the answer "Everything". This may be initially plausible ...
Mikhail Katz's user avatar
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6 votes

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

Quine is simply presenting a definition of 'everything'. Think of it this way. If I ask 'what is there?', a correct but unhelpful answer is 'whatever there is'. You cannot disagree with that answer, ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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0 votes

Unperceived Existence

First, let's look at a concrete example of an unperceived existence -- that of the Isaac Newton's universal gravity. The gravitational force is quite weak -- so weak, we only feel its pull from the ...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
0 votes

Unperceived Existence

Yes, we infer what is not perceived from our models of the world (or "worldview" to some). That is all we can do, unless we're a solipsist, which treats it all as fantastical, presumably. ...
Marxos's user avatar
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Unperceived Existence

"Do we infer the unperceived existence of what we perceive from the nature of our experience? If so, how? If not, why not?" Nature of our experience seems to refer to features of our senses (...
Agent Smith's user avatar
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1 vote

What would it be like for a person with no senses and no motor functions at all since birth?

They called him Subject Zero. But, inside that sealed environment, behind the wires sustaining his frail body, was he a 'him' at all? No light had ever kissed his unseeing eyes, nor sound dared ...
Groovy's user avatar
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3 votes

Unperceived Existence

What the question is getting at is the fact that when you perceive something, such as a yellow cup of coffee, what you actually experience is the sensation of seeing a yellow cup of coffee. The ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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0 votes

Unperceived Existence

Your question does not have a simple answer, it leads into an area of ongoing research and thinking in both philosophy and neuroscience Humans are wired up with neural nets. Data comes into these ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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1 vote

Unperceived Existence

The question in its condensed form and without further context sounds a bit strange. Nevertheless, it makes sense when posed in the following form: Does an object exist even when we do not perceive ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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2 votes

Unperceived Existence

The way Kant defines objective existence for the observer, existence arises from the joining of concept with sense data: while possibility was merely a positing of a thing in relation to the ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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0 votes

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

Yes. According to David Lewis' modal realism, things only have to be possible in order to be "real." Lewis held that this world was just one among many like it. A proposition, p is possibly ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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1 vote

How does the claim that existence is not a predicate of objects interact with abstract objects?

Insofar as we equate a specific set of quantifications-over with a given catalog of ontology, then in the Quine-Putnam indispensability argument, for example, we quantify over, and hence commit ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
1 vote

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

As is very often the case in seemingly deep and grandiose statements about physics, this one is utterly boring. The truth is usually boring. You get to deep, exciting and counterintuitive truths on ...
g s's user avatar
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1 vote

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

Cosmologists have no problem with the idea that the universe extends beyond the observable universe (but unobservable because the universe has not been in existence for long enough for light from ...
Dikran Marsupial's user avatar
1 vote

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

Is there a flavour of philosophy where the particle would be considered to exist before it is observed? when you say about a particle that existed before it is observed, you indirectly imply the ...
SonOfThought's user avatar
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