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Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice?

It is not the duty of the philosopher to makes things as simple as possible. It is the job of the Doctor of Philosophy to make things as simple as possible. In this way, philosophy converges, over ...
Marxos's user avatar
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Does the want to seek determinism in physics come from a fallacy that it explains more?

The greatest benefit of living in deterministic Universe is not that we can explain what already happened, but that we can predict what will happen. In particular, this gives us agency by allowing us ...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
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Does the want to seek determinism in physics come from a fallacy that it explains more?

I wonder then if this is a mistake. If there is a law that maps A to B, one can also further ask: why is there a law that maps A to B rather than A to C? Or even A to D? Presumably, there is no ...
Barmar's user avatar
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-1 votes

Does the want to seek determinism in physics come from a fallacy that it explains more?

Does the want to seek determinism in physics come from a fallacy that it explains more? That is a question about the motivations of any physicists who happen to have that want, not about philosophy. ...
John Bollinger's user avatar
8 votes

Does the want to seek determinism in physics come from a fallacy that it explains more?

You seem to have it backwards with regards to what science (in particular physics) is doing. Where mathematics, logic and to some extend religion build a universe from the ground up, so where they ...
haxor789's user avatar
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-1 votes

Does the want to seek determinism in physics come from a fallacy that it explains more?

Probabilistic events do not occur the way you describe. There are no discreet outcomes with equal probability. Instead there is a continuum of probabilities called normal distribution. The effect for ...
Pertti Ruismäki's user avatar
2 votes

Does the want to seek determinism in physics come from a fallacy that it explains more?

Physics isn't practiced just for the sake of it- much of what gets discovered in physics ends up being put to use for all kinds of purposes. So, the question is whether the 'explanations' developed by ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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1 vote

Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice?

I wonder if it is not actually the opposite. Modern philosophy deals with concepts, their critique and production. By "concept" I mean abstract but well identified ideas used as fundamental ...
armand's user avatar
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1 vote

Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice?

Philosophy has a handicap: It could not start as a greenfield strategy. Instead philosophy inherited its tasks from religious speculation. It took a while until philosophy had designed its tools ready ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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4 votes

Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice?

If simplifying explanations should be a core aim of philosophy, then many philosophers are hopelessly off target. What annoys me most about philosophy are the acres of verbose and impenetrable text (...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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2 votes

Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice?

Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice? Absolutely, or rather: it is a crucial motivating aspect of certain philosophical systems; and in particular to ...
Joseph Weissman's user avatar
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1 vote

Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice?

As in many disciplines, there's a significant difference between solving the practical, day-to-day problems we encounter, and studying the theory of that discipline in critical detail. For instance, ...
Barmar's user avatar
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1 vote

Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice?

When coming back to using names like Kant etc., what we are doing (in IT terms) is basically a "function call" or "alias" operation. Mentioning the "Kantian Imperative" ...
AnoE's user avatar
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7 votes

Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice?

Suppose you are confronted with an intricate knot, like the Gordian one say, hard to untangle, and out of which a thick tapestry has been woven, blocking access to some wondrous treasure chest, or the ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
5 votes

Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice?

I am very happy to live in an era where I have access to the useful insights of generations of prior deep thinkers. Wisdom is cumulative, and today just one educated adult knows more about their ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Should reducing and simplifying explanations be a core aspect of Philosophical practice?

This has been tried before, by the analytics. Here are some quotes for those interested, although this is well-known to those in the academe. Quine: "there are two types of people, interested in ...
emesupap's user avatar
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0 votes

What is an explanation really?

The word 'explanation' has several meanings. The meaning you have in mind is an account of the reasons or causes of whatever is being explained. There is no absolute requirement for an explanation to ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 18.3k
0 votes

What is an explanation really?

well, i can't see your 'explanation' could be wrong, explanation is exactly what you think, explanation is to give it idea about what it is, how it is, where it is, when it is, why it is. well it's a ...
Bobi brai's user avatar

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