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Logical Fallacies: Difference between Appeal to popularity and Appeal to Authority

Ad Populum: "God exists because most people believe it" (that is, the proposition is correct because the majority takes it as correct). Ad Verecundiam: "God exists because Aristotle, ...
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Finding a fallacy in a comedic dialogue

Just so it's said, comedy often bends the rules of logic, but it doesn't necessarily break them. Fallacies (formally) refer to particular mistakes in the transference of characteristics between ...
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Finding a fallacy in a comedic dialogue

To summarize a little there are several fallacious ideas in place here. The most obvious one is that the "pars pro toto" approach doesn't work in that Abbot is a part of the public but he's ...
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Logical Fallacies: Difference between Appeal to popularity and Appeal to Authority

I mean under the hood all fallacies are non sequitur, meaning that the conclusion doesn't follow from the premise. So all of them will, in some regard, be similar to each other. In terms of the appeal ...
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Logical Fallacies: Difference between Appeal to popularity and Appeal to Authority

An authority is a person or institution in whom the public, or a particular section of the public (e.g. those within a religious tradition), vests confidence. To appeal to authority is to seek ...
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Logical Fallacies: Difference between Appeal to popularity and Appeal to Authority

Appeal to popularity: "It is a popular view that Y is so, thus Y is so" Is a fallacy since the assertion does not follow from the premises, because there are reasons other than the fact that ...
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Logical Fallacies: Difference between Appeal to popularity and Appeal to Authority

Appeal to authority is not a fallacy. The fallacy is appeal to inappropriate authority. For an extended discussion of this, see: https://ses.edu/logical-fallacies-101-appeal-to-authority-ad-...
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Name of fallacy: amplifying weakness of weak arguments while ignoring strong ones

This is known as a weak man argument, inspired by the phrase 'straw man'.
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Name of fallacy: amplifying weakness of weak arguments while ignoring strong ones

It might be said that Rob is being Hermeneutically uncharitable. That is, Rob is trying to defeat Bob, rather than engage in useful discussion. Daniel Dennett might say Rob is engaging in the tendency ...
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Name of fallacy: amplifying weakness of weak arguments while ignoring strong ones

This sounds similar to the argument from fallacy. The argument from fallacy is when a person says that if a particular argument for X is fallacious, then X must be false. Rob is doing something like ...
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Is a game player winning against very long odds being a cheat, an example of the logical fallacy of personal incredulity?

No, this is not a good example of the fallacy. The argument from personal incredulity fallacy is called like that when the a subjective likelihood is exaggerated or its interpretation is exaggerated, ...
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