Skip to main content
6 votes

What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

Here are the main assumption(s) that some ppl break with: (a) Crucially, the notion of proof here is unclear: we can formalize definitions of free will, add an accepted formal system and suitably ...
emesupap's user avatar
  • 2,462
6 votes
Accepted

What are philosophers doing when they are discussing free will?

The main thing is that, in much of the up-to-date debate, we start out with the concept/phrase "moral responsibility," and then relativize free will to that: "Free will is whatever ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
4 votes

What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

I will generalize your question a bit, hopefully this is still interesting to you too: If the outcome of a debate cannot possibly have an impact on my (our) lives, then why take part in the debate? ...
mudskipper's user avatar
3 votes

Why is The Milgram Experiment used in reference to the Nazis free will

[Edited] The Milgram experiment is frequently cited as proof that most people in the Nazis situation would act similar to them. Many research is misquoted or used of proof for which it isn't. There ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,811
3 votes

The Evolution of Free Will: Is Kevin Mitchell's argument robust?

Mitchell presents a recent state of physicalist science about biology and the universe, all of which point to compatibilist free will. Instead of acknowledging this, he just repeatedly makes baseless ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,811
3 votes

The Evolution of Free Will: Is Kevin Mitchell's argument robust?

I generally recommend that one dig into the details of someone's thinking through their writings, not a video, as videos are much harder to backtrack and cross-check with than writing. However, I ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 14.6k
3 votes

The Evolution of Free Will: Is Kevin Mitchell's argument robust?

"If the 'ability to make decisions' is a valid definition, then Mitchell simply stating that we make choices routinely is assuming that which he is trying to prove." I think it's worse than ...
TKoL's user avatar
  • 3,512
3 votes

What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

Of course there is a reason. God is the main religious concept, and religion is a social institution of control and power. People defend the concept they were brainwashed with since childhood to keep ...
Groovy's user avatar
  • 1,177
2 votes

What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

You ask: What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things? Coming from a position heavily influenced by the linguistic turn, the existence of what might better be ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
2 votes

Why is The Milgram Experiment used in reference to the Nazis free will

Why is Milgram so frequently cited in relation to the Nazis in any context? As conifold commented: Because Milgram himself set them in this context: Obedience, as a determinant of behavior, is of ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 6,648
2 votes

The Evolution of Free Will: Is Kevin Mitchell's argument robust?

You define free will as the „ability to make decisions“. This definition seems to me useful to discuss the qestion of free will. I watched Mitchell’s video in full length. I also stumbled over his ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 33.7k
2 votes

What are philosophers doing when they are discussing free will?

Events van habe a cause for happening and/or a reason for happening. A cause means a prior event triggering the next event. A reason means some purpose. Lifeless nature is typically agreed in secular ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,811
1 vote

What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

In general, humans are curious. When we observe phenomena in the world, we want to know what causes them. This curiosity leads to research and development, and the end result has been our tremendous ...
Barmar's user avatar
  • 1,808
1 vote

What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

With regard to the continuum hypothesis you mentioned, it is worth noting that there are indeed some mathematicians who view it as a kind of "metaphysical thing" as you put it. Solomon ...
Mikhail Katz's user avatar
  • 1,489
1 vote

Schopenhauer and the 'ability to make decisions' as a metric for free will

I lean towards Schopenhauer's negation of free will. Schopenhauer's theory is based on the concept of self consistency and unity of will and appearance. To determine whether Schopenhauer agrees with ...
Mike Song's user avatar
  • 113
1 vote

What is the rigorous definition of free will?

One cent. Definitions of "free will" vary depending on whether one agrees that strict determinism holds (compatibilists) or not (libertarians). Or, in other words, about the ability to do ...
Nikos M.'s user avatar
  • 2,877

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible