10 votes
Accepted

What is the decisive point for classifying a certain speech as unacceptable?

The short answer is J.S. Mill's "harm" principle" In an attempt to use Mill’s own argument against him, critics often cite the frequently misunderstood harm principle. This principle, ...
gonzo's user avatar
  • 1,865
10 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

Freedom of speech is already abridged by laws on defamation, copyright infringement, national security, contempt of court etc. So the principle is already established that freedom of speech is not ...
Meanach's user avatar
  • 2,357
10 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

From the Universal Declaration of Human Rights proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948: Article 19: Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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8 votes

What are the moral arguments for slavery?

TL/DR There isn't one, or at least not a good one. Slavery has built in inefficiencies and brutalizing effects for both slave and free populations. What are our goals and values? There are a large ...
philosodad's user avatar
  • 3,311
7 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

No. The question is analogous to freedom of movement. I am entitled to move as I like, but with a very large number of conventional constraints. I cannot use my freedom of movement to break into your ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.5k
6 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

If the term hate speech had been around in the 1930's, you can bet your last dollar that anything supportive or defensive of Jewish people would have received that label under the Nazi regime. The ...
EvilSnack's user avatar
  • 278
6 votes
Accepted

Does the paradox of tolerance mean that intolerance cannot be allowed in a tolerant society?

John Rawls offers this assessment of the problem (A Theory of Justice, 1999 ed., §35): ... it seems that an intolerant sect has no title to complain when it is denied an equal liberty. ... A ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

How is it that humans can contemplate individual liberty for some while at the same time accept the idea of owning and selling fellow humans?

(This answer elaborates a bit on R. Barzell's answer.) Charles Mills takes up this question in his book The Racial Contract. The title of Mills' book refers to a kind of inversion of classical ...
Dan Hicks's user avatar
  • 2,507
5 votes

Why is consent important?

Generally in modern societies it is accepted that you should treat people with respect for their individual rights, preferences and wellbeing unless there is an overriding reason to do otherwise. The ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.5k
5 votes

What are the moral arguments for slavery?

The socioeconomic argument for slavery is simple enough. It's precisely the same socioeconomic argument used to defend the domestication animals, to wit: Certain people or groups of people (like ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 19.6k
4 votes

Why is freedom obscure for Arendt? How does she prove or illustrate such obscurity?

See Action, Freedom, and Plurality in Hannah Arendt: or Arendt, action is one of the fundamental categories of the human condition and constitutes the highest realization of the vita activa. [...] ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
4 votes

Is "human dignity" sufficient to be a "foundational value"? Why?

I think this question raises genuine difficulties about dignity as a foundational value. The term, 'dignity', is entrenched in moral and political theoretical discourse but is hardly used outside it. ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.7k
4 votes

Why is consent important?

TL;DR Harm reduction? People care about their autonomy and self-determination, taking that away from them is a direct attack upon them. An attack that is likely causing harm, doing damage and might ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 5,891
4 votes
Accepted

How is Rawls's "liberalism" reasonably classified as liberal by this SEP article?

Perhaps the concept of "liberty per se" is not very stable, or is even self-defeating. The freedom-to-lose-freedom, for example, seems (A) wrong to use or (B) wrong to even have. So one ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
4 votes

What are the moral arguments for slavery?

Some hypothetical arguments in favor of slavery: when slaves are sufficiently acclimated to their standard of living, they may suffer less than someone who is not would. If someone is psychologically ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
3 votes

Would there be free will if we assume a stochastic component in the decision making?

I think it's a big assumption, but not without some merit. Firstly, we don't know if there are truly random events at all. To say that an event is random means that we don't have sufficient ...
Alex Sotka's user avatar
3 votes

Does free software contradict its own "free as in speech" metaphor?

The freedom in free speech is freedom from restrictions imposed by the state. Now what freedom from restrictions by the state could "free software" refer to? It can only be the existing ...
viuser's user avatar
  • 4,761
3 votes

How is it that humans can contemplate individual liberty for some while at the same time accept the idea of owning and selling fellow humans?

They reserved these rights for humans and called those they wished to enslave "subhuman". Humans do this all the time; they manage to maintain contradictory positions by creating distinctions ...
R. Barzell's user avatar
  • 1,830
3 votes

Do philosophers have some arguments regarding possible explanations for origin of free will?

I know one argument for this free will problem. I think that it proves the existence of free will. it is the lazy argument or called idle argument. If you are sure that I have no free will and ...
Ferkan Zeki's user avatar
3 votes

What is freedom of speech?

The right to say absolutely anything could be called "absolute freedom of speech", but that does not exist in any country. "Regular" freedom of speech is typically understood as ...
ReasonMeThis's user avatar
3 votes

What is freedom of speech?

Paul Ricoeur gives a definition of the democratic quality of society that goes as such (best effort translation and emphasis mine): A democratic society recognizes it is divided, its citizens having ...
armand's user avatar
  • 6,314
3 votes

Why is consent important?

In less developed (tribal or hunter-gatherer societies) consent is important because doing things to others without consent invites violent retribution. If A steals B's chickens (takes them without ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 19.6k
3 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

Questions about law and policy are questions about compulsion by the threat of violence. The related question about moral permissibility has an obvious answer. You should not say morally wrong things. ...
g s's user avatar
  • 5,885
3 votes

What are the moral arguments for slavery?

There really isn't a good argument for slavery. The "best" would probably be "personal enrichment by exploiting other people" and "torture as a penalty" or genocide (...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 5,891
2 votes

What are the authoritative books advocating restrictions on Freedom of Speech?

Perhaps you need to clarify what you intend 'freedom of speech' to cover and include. Below I take it that you are concerned with freedom of speech in the sense of the expression of ideas, principles, ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.7k
2 votes

What are the authoritative books advocating restrictions on Freedom of Speech?

...the authoritative books against [freedom of speech] Two passages from Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four : (1) O'Brien's conversation with Winston Smith while interrogating Smith in prison; (2) The ...
Mark Andrews's user avatar
  • 6,236
2 votes
Accepted

Are fate and the power to choose two separate dimensions?

In a classical universe, it may be possible in principle to predict things, but impossible in practice. So we use predictors like character and identity instead of just initial conditions. In a ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 21.7k
2 votes

How can I abandon beliefs supplied by the culture?

Emotional reactions to things are an automated response to your own underlying values. The fact that you experience a feeling of guilt from your rejection of these beliefs therefore suggests that you ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 1,926
2 votes

According to Stirner, are other humans "spooks"?

Invoking the diction 'ego' is to many to invoke psychology, or at least Freudian thinking, if you reject the latter is the former. Yet, Max Stirner is recognized in his book The Ego and Its Own as ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
2 votes
Accepted

Does anyone talk about freedom from yourself?

Freedom from the self is NOT an existentialist concept, but it does occur frequently in other places throughout philosophy. One of the most famous is in Plato's Republic, where the unjust man is ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.1k

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