17 votes

Is it logical to seek revenge?

You use the word 'logical' in the sense of rational. Thus, you are looking for rationales for the use of revenge. Philosophical analysis by Hobbes who characterized this world as violent in his ...
J D's user avatar
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14 votes

Is it logical to seek revenge?

The possibility of revenge prevents attacks against you because they are risky. Always going for revenge makes life more dangerous for you because an attacker knows they must make it impossible for ...
gnasher729's user avatar
  • 5,243
9 votes

Is it logical to seek revenge?

In the book Systems of Survival Jane Jacobs puts forward the thesis that humans have two fundamental systems of ethics. She calls them syndromes. Wiki Link The first, and probably the older, she calls ...
Boba Fit's user avatar
  • 995
7 votes
Accepted

How valid is assignment of probabilites when evidence is totally lacking, as in Pascal's Wager?

There are plenty of issues with subjective probability assignments to degrees of belief discussed e.g. in SEP's Subjective Probability Theory. I will only address the one outlined in the OP. For a ...
Conifold's user avatar
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5 votes

Is it logical to seek revenge?

" "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred. "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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3 votes

Is it logical to seek revenge?

Revenge is logical as a way to prevent the other from doing more harm. Somebody killed someone you love? You kill him in revenge so he won't kill more people you love. Perfectly logical. It isn't ...
Ivo's user avatar
  • 131
3 votes

Is it logical to seek revenge?

In the iterated prisoner's dilemma there's a famous algorithm called Tit-for-tat (which curiously has the same meaning of the proverbial "an eye for an eye" you quoted), written in FORTRAN ...
Gerardo Furtado's user avatar
3 votes

Is it logical to seek revenge?

"Seeking revenge" is alogical, not illogical. You can easily construct a logical reason to seek revenge. Roughly: I want to destroy this society; seeking revenge sparks an escalating cycle ...
fectin's user avatar
  • 251
3 votes

Are the prisoner's dilemma and game theory relevant to this competitive workplace scenario?

These interactions can be better modeled with Drama Theory, which covers a set of individuals playing multiple games in a row, with the ability to change their decision making process between game ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Is quantum indeterminacy inextricable from observation?

Quantum indeterminacy is inextricable from observation because that which we consider to be "quantum indeterminacy" is related to the interpretations of QM rather than the mathematical model behind QM....
Cort Ammon's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Rational Player in Game Theory

It would never be rational to be irrational. In Rational Actor Theory, a rational actor is goal-oriented, reflective and consistent. If you act irrationally, you will not achieve one of these goals. ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
  • 17.5k
2 votes

Is the spiral of silence an original game model?

The prisoner's dilemma is basically a thought game, while the spiral of silence is more of a psychological disposition towards the social aspect of life, thus it is not primarily based on logic.
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
2 votes

Is it logical to seek revenge?

People believe revenge or "violence" to be illogical, impractical and immoral Yes, you find people who subscribe to any and all beliefs one could imagine. You would have to define what you ...
AnoE's user avatar
  • 1,992
1 vote

Is the spiral of silence an original game model?

I am unsure of the intent of your question. But the spiral of silence is a sociological term. It is quite distinct from the prisoner's dilemma, which is understood as part of game theory. The spiral ...
Meanach's user avatar
  • 2,004
1 vote

Is it logical to seek revenge?

Most of the arguments against seem to assume that the initial harm stops and won't be repeated or continued by the other party. What if getting away with the initial harm causes them to commit more ...
majinnaibu's user avatar
1 vote

Is it logical to seek revenge?

My two cents. We can start with two premises: It is perfectly rational for someone to seek restoration for some harm done. It is also perfectly rational for someone to act towards preventing harm or ...
Nikos M.'s user avatar
  • 2,143
1 vote

Is it logical to seek revenge?

Logic simply does not deal with things like revenge, love and hope. Those are emotions. Psychology, ethics and morals deal with those topics, not logic. It makes sense to ask if it is moral / ethical ...
Dennis Kozevnikoff's user avatar
1 vote

Is it logical to seek revenge?

It isn't logical to seek revenge. It doesn't do any good. I can't believe that we have a specific instinct in regard to moral behaviour, which is not instinctive. The best explanation I can think of ...
Ludwig V's user avatar
  • 2,520
1 vote

Antiknowledge (as epistemic antigraphs)

Building on the idea of the role of doubt, put forward by Thinkingman, I wonder if there is a meaningful parallel with certain methods in formal options analysis. When deciding between a number of ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 13.5k
1 vote

Graham Priest's "escape from Hell" puzzle

I have never run into Priest’s puzzle before. This is interesting. I suppose the calculations would go like this: At some point the probability of success rises high enough that, although the odds in ...
Mark Andrews's user avatar
  • 6,140
1 vote

Graham Priest's "escape from Hell" puzzle

The chapter is just Pascal's Wager and this, under the heading Decision Theory: Great Expectations, yet concludes with "So it looks as though the only rational thing to do is to be irrational!&...
J Kusin's user avatar
  • 2,385
1 vote

Is there a name for the phenomenon where a system that selects for one quality eventually leads to optimizing that quality at the cost of others?

Caveat As Ted Wrigley noted, there's a difference between a system that develops to have a clash in values between the part and the whole, and one that develops parts that might lead to the failure of ...
J D's user avatar
  • 23.1k
1 vote

Is there a name for the phenomenon where a system that selects for one quality eventually leads to optimizing that quality at the cost of others?

You are referring to a perverse incentive, "an incentive that has an unintended and undesirable result that is contrary to the intentions of its designers." Also under the heading of ...
causative's user avatar
  • 11.1k
1 vote

Is there a difference between game sense and game theory?

"Game theory" is a field of mathematics which studies rational decision-making in certain abstract interactions called "games" - which are not exactly sports games. A game in game ...
causative's user avatar
  • 11.1k
1 vote

How do you estimate a witness reliability who claims to have seen a miracle? Question about miss-rate neglect fallacy

What accounts for misinterpretation by Linda? Assume Linda is a small kid, now she may have seen Santa and will testify it but we know it is her dad whom she probably saw. Probably another good ...
Notwen's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote

According to game theory, are people trustworthy?

Game theory models how people behave in terms of incentives. That's useful in a wide variety of contexts, whether talking about ecological systems, individuals, corporations, or nations. "Game ...
djechlin's user avatar
  • 243
1 vote

According to game theory, are people trustworthy?

People have incentives to tell the truth, and to lie. Agents within a system will use different strategies, and face different consequences. The whole point of game theory is different Nash equilibria ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 20.5k
1 vote

Logical fallacy: Person argues with wrong probability of event, without considering similar events

Short Answer I'm familiar with no precising definition for this persuasive, but erroneous line of thinking that could be used in an argument, however, arguably this is either equivocation of 'rare' or ...
J D's user avatar
  • 23.1k
1 vote

Logical fallacy: Person argues with wrong probability of event, without considering similar events

Strictly speaking, an error is not necessarily a fallacy, it becomes one only when used to illegitimately support an argument. The observation your person is making isn't a logical fallacy --it isn't ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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