Hot answers tagged

6

The Platonic Socrates did not claim that he knew nothing. When asked by Chaerephon whether there were any wiser than Socrates, the Delphic Oracle replied that there was no one wiser (Apology, 21A). This puzzled Socrates, who thought he had no wisdom at all. He questioned the reputedly wise, then the poets, then the craftsmen or artisans. He concluded, not ...


5

Ethicist Peter Singer defends infanticide in his books Should the Baby Live? and Practical Ethics. The following is an excerpt from an editorial in the Washington Post which quotes Singer's writings directly: From "Practical Ethics": "Human babies are not born self-aware, or capable of grasping that they exist over time. They are not persons." But ...


4

There is no inconsistency. First of all, we have to consider that the "real" Socrates and the main character in many Plato's dialogues, called Socrates, are obviously linked but not exactly the same person. Plato had personal experience of Socrates and for sure he borrowed in many ways from Socrates, but in reading Plato's dialogues it is not easy to draw ...


4

I'm not sure whether 'prime time' is their time or our time. For our own time I'd nominate Sextus Empiricus (160 - 210 CE) who wrote subtly and coherently on a wide range of philosophical topics, and much of whose work remains - and remains in print in the Loeb Library. Every historian of ancient Greek philosophy is fully aware of Sextus Empiricus's work ...


2

Infanticide, euthanasia, and the intrinsic value of human life Your question focuses on infanticide but the considerations you advance in its favour show, or so it seems to me, that euthanasia is the real, the major issue here. Your infanticide is only a special case of euthanasia : that of terminating a life in the (supposed) interests of the euthanised ...


2

Welcome to PSE. Left to myself I should say that non-contextually hope is neither good nor evil. Let's get hope into conceptual focus. (1) If I hope for something then I must, under some description, desire it. I can't hope for something I don't in any respect want. (2) To hope for something, rather than merely to wish for it or day dream about it, I ...


2

In my and others philosophical view hope is for the weak, so yes, overall it's something not really helpful. We have various hope-related situations. In one situation, you did everything you could and still some things did not get the way they suppose to. In this case hope can indirectly have good effects because it can help maintain a positive attitude. ...


2

Box is a mistranslation. Pithos is an Ancient vase not a box. However vase is a metaphore. Its shape and use as container refers to pregnancy. Pandora’s name is also not understood, but as she was interpreted by the church to be equal to Eve, her name can be understood as to come fro. από άνθρωπο (from man) which has a similar meaning as the Biblical story ...


2

Parallel Greek-English Aristotle followed by St. Thomas Aquinas's commentary in parallel Latin-English or just English: Commentaries on Aristotle Peri Hermeneias (Latin & English / English) Posteriora Analytica (Latin & English / English) Physica (Latin & English / English) De cœlo et mundo (Latin & English /...


2

It is clearly a joke... Charles Harrington Elster does not seem to be an Ancient Greek Philosophy expert. If his work is about "words", I imagine that he has set up a "verbal joke" : see the Greek word lexicon : pertaining to words. And see also phago- : the Greek root for "eating". Thus Lexiphagoras may be read as "the word eater" or "the devourer of ...


1

For Aristotle, all change is change of or in a substance. Substances are what ultimately exist and are the fundamental bearers or subjects of change. If a substance undergoes change in its essential, defining properties, in the sense that it loses those properties, then it ceases to exist as that substance. If a human being is essentially (definably) a ...


1

Here is a less crude translation of this fragment, commonly referred to as B16: "As each man has a union of the much wandering limbs of the body, so is mind present to men. For it is the same thing which the constitution of the limbs (mind) thinks, both in each and every man." The translation is quoted from Parmenides' Way of Truth and B16 by ...


1

That you are not able to find "Lexiphagoras" and I was not able to find "Alphasia" suggests that Charles Harrington Elster may have made this name and place up. Looking at the use of this name in There's a Word for It suggests Elster is not expecting us to take this reference seriously. For example, Elster quotes a nicely rhyming limerick as one of ...


1

Is infanticide justifiable in any circumstances? This is just a cost benefit evaluation. For example can you afford to raise the kid ? Maybe not, as happens in fairy tales hansel & gretel, Hop-o'-My-Thumb where adoption doesnt seem to be an option. But reality beats fiction, in some extreme situations cannibalism occurs (most famously R v Dudley and ...


1

Friction is no more than the interaction of actual material, affecting the organization of that material as well as those "characteristics" imputed to them by man's system of reasoning, through the information of the intellect by the body. That is how friction produces the sensation of "heat," or, the phantasm sent to the mind from the quick movements of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible