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Alasdair MacIntyre is a 20th/21st century philosopher writing in English. Immanuel Kant was an 18th century philosopher writing in German. G.W.F Hegel was a 19th century philosopher writing in German. Both were trained in theology at different points during their education. For this education, they had to learn biblical Greek. Adorno was a 20th century ...


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In very broad strokes: All of the definitions you propose for "dialectic" share a common, crucial factor: that truth is not static, but something that unfolds via a back-and-forth process. Plato, the scholastics, Hegel, and Kierkegaard all subscribe to this notion, and the differences in usage between them are secondary when viewed in this manner. ...


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First, "le sacre monstre" is bad French for "le monstre sacré" which while literally meaning "the holy monster" (thus the bad French putting the adjective in the wrong place) means "a public figure that is left alone" or isolated. Many continental philosophers see Hegel as evil and the source of problems, thus the devil role. He's often a target for ...


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I think (and I broadly agree here with Eckart Förster, whose book The Twenty-Five Years of Philosophy will be quoted here for reference) that Hegel roughly follows Kant's understanding of science. Therefore, clarifying what Kant wrote about science may help to elucidate how this intertwines with the idea of a single principle. Kant himself on science Kant ...


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It's nearly impossible to decipher Hegel even with that sort of background without a teacher. While I think knowledge of Kant and Spinoza is helpful, you should also be read up on your Plato and Aristotle. I would recommend reading some secondary literature alongside it. I recommend Lauer's Hegel's idea of philosophy and Frederick Baser's Hegel. I would ...


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In the analytic world, Hegel is especially unpopular. There's a lot of reasons for this: His robust commitment to metaphysics His writing style His popularity at Oxford during the 19th and early 20th centuries (McTaggart, Bradley) The third feature highlights how analytic philosophy was, in part, a reaction to the philosophical style of the British ...


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Aside from specific criticisms that Hegel made of Newton his overriding reason was ideological, and he hated not so much Newton as "Newtonianism" which he saw as a motivation for "degrading" of philosophy. Collection of essays Hegel and Newtonianism explores the issue at length, see especially Gower's entry. "Newtonian" philosophers, like Locke and Hume, ...


7

Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel were divided in most significant respects by their views about realism and naturalism, the status of subject-object identity, and the nature of rationality and intellectual intuition. The differences between Fichte and Schelling are explored in depth in Hegel’s Differenz des Fichteschen und Schellingschen Systems der Philosophie (...


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I wouldn't go so far as to say that wikipedia can answer the question completely, but it's not a bad start. The meaning of Spirit (Geist) is complicated and a matter of contested interpretation, but I will just explain to some extent what happens with spirit in Phenomenology of Spirit (or Mind), hereafter PhG. To summarize very quickly, the PhG is a story ...


7

You're reading the Knox translation. Nisbet (the more recent Cambridge translation) translates as follows It is impossible to break into the inner conviction of human beings; it is inviolable, and the moral will is therefore inaccessible. The worth of a human is measured by his inward actions, and hence the point of view of morality is that of freedom ...


7

I feel as though you want an answer to this question that analyzes Nietzsche's work against Hegel's and shows how each one could be used to support Nazi ideology. However, I don't think that is the right way to answer this question. The reason that Nietzsche's work was appropriated by the Nazis more often than Hegel's was has nothing to do with the merit or ...


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The question is a bit like asking "Where should I go on my first trip to China?" You should go, or start, wherever is easiest and most interesting to you. Whether you read Kojeve, or Hyppolite, or the preface to Hegel's Phenomenology (or whether you visit old Beijing, or the hotspots of Shanghai, or take a Yangtze River cruise) you will learn a lot. And ...


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Hegel's "hate affair" with Newton dated from the early years of Hegel's career : in 1801 Hegel came to Jena with the encouragement of his old friend Schelling. Hegel secured a position at the University as a Privatdozent (unsalaried lecturer) after submitting an inaugural dissertation : Dissertatio Philosophica de Orbitis Planetarium (Philosophical ...


6

You might be interested in Alexandre Kojève's Introduction to the Reading of Hegel. The first chapter is available on the site DBK recommended (www.marxists.org). Kojève has a few other works of note (though only the Introduction and Outline of a Phenomenology of Right have been translated into English--though The Concept, Time, and Discourse is supposed to ...


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The site you link to (marxism.org) has lots of freely available material: Index of Marxists.org Hegel Archives Some Helpful Reference Materials from Marxists.org In particular you might want to have a look at these real classics: Marxists.org Criticisms of Hegel Marx and Engels wrote copiously on Hegel themselves. Marxists.org Archive of Marx on Hegel ...


6

You may be referring to the motto extracted from Spinoza: Omnis determinatio est negatio, every determination is negation. As applied to knowledge, it means that we know something by knowing what it is not, what it differs from. Spinoza's wording is not as succinct: "...he who says that he apprehends a figure, thereby means to indicate simply this, that ...


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I think Kant would take exception to being called an ontological idealist or dualist. There is no dualism between appearances and things in themselves in the Cartesian sense of "dualism", the "supersensible substrate" of appearances is strictly unknowable. On ontology critical Kant remained strictly agnostic, no matter how much it seems he wanted to ...


6

I am not sure how to prove a negative, it is unlikely that we will have it in Hegel's own words that he did not live at the end times. But the idea that Hegel saw his time as "the end of history" is not supported by modern scholarship. Dale in Hegel, Evil, and the End of History traces the fable back to none other than Nietzsche, namely to his Untimely ...


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The claim that Hegel stands in any line at the start of which is Plotinus looks highly suspect to me. I make just two points. In the first place, Hegel's Absolute or God, or One if one chooses that terminology, has an inescapably historical dimension. The Absolute develops through time, seeking ever more adequate modes of expression and embodiment, ever ...


5

To get things out of the way, I wouldn't describe Hegel as an obscurantist (i.e., a philosopher or thinker committed to making his position obscure), but I would say he's very difficult to read. At the same time, I would say that Hegel is often obscure to 21st century readers. I would also say that he's a poor "author" -- where we need to understand that he'...


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I think yes, of course it makes sense to read Hegel in translation. But reading it in English only and without guidance will not work. Think of the books of Hegel (and other contempory philosophers) and their origin: Summarizing past and basing future lectures. If you read this book while hearing the lecture of Hegel himself, I think with some effort you ...


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It's a part of how we think about or answer the question "what is it"? Aristotle asked the question and tried to answer it in the Categories, an important foundation of classical logic. Hegel is basically answering the same questions, but with the insight from Kant's transcendental idealism. For example: this thing (substance) over there, it's a horse (a ...


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Yes, I believe Hegel has been treated largely with hostility or neglect in the analytic camp from the time Russell accused him "simple logical errors."Russell himself was originally steeped in Hegel, Bradley, and the British idealists, so his renunciation carried weight. (As the famous weather report goes: "Fog Over Channel, Continent Cut Off.") The parting ...


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I think on a basic reading of the text, the master cannot misrecognize himself as the slave. It's important to realize a few things about the passage. Recognition is reflected recognition -- meaning the master achieves his master status by being a master to the slave and getting responded to in this way. Conversely, the slave is slave insofar as he ...


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The myth of thesis-antithesis-synthesis " Dialectic" does not for Hegel mean " thesis, antithesis, and synthesis." ... Hermann Glockner's reliable Hegel Lexikon (4 volumes, Stuttgart, 1935) does not list the Fichtean terms "thesis, antithesis, synthesis " together. In all the twenty volumes of Hegel's " complete works " he does not use this ...


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Hegel didn't think family relationships should be viewed as essentially contractual (that is part of what makes them family, rather than civil-law or financial relationships) and conversely, he didn't think property-rights and contract-rights could coherently extend to encompass non-economic parts of someone's life. (For example, you can tell someone you'...


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I'll consider that your question is two-fold, one relating to the relationship between Deleuze & Hegel, and secondly, the source of inspiration of Difference & Repetition. With regard to the first question, Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995) had an educational formation steeped in the history of philosophy. From major to minor characters in the history of ...


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Here's one way to look at it that might be of interest. I'm not sure that it'll be satisfying in getting to grips with the difference between objects "in the mind" and "material" things, but it is one philosophical explanation for why we might take statements such as "1+1=2" to be in some sense true independently of the way the observable world is perceived ...


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My answer would be no. a static configuration of Id-Ego mediated by a Superego this is an incorrect statement of Freud's model. In psychology Freud's formulation is often referred to as 'psychodynamic', one emphasising that internal instability is primary to any 'static configuration'. Also The Ego in Freudian psychology is the mediating agency between ...


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