The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
10

Long story short: This has already been done by scholars, but... See e.g. (and for further reading and sources) Gosetti-Ferencei, Jennifer Anna. Heidegger, Hölderlin, and the subject of poetic language: Toward a new poetics of Dasein. Fordham Univ Press, 2004: It has been pointed out that Heidegger both comes closer to Hölderlin than any other reader ...


9

First, I want to mention an important rule (which of course has caveats), but the accuracy with which a philosopher writes about the history of philosophy is in general inversely proportional to their own fame (and infamy). There's several different dimensions on which we can trace Heidegger's beliefs about Greek and German being the only languages for ...


7

Given that you have about a month and a half to prepare, in which you estimate you can read two or three books, I would not recommend starting with Aristotle to understand Being and Time. Instead, I might focus on the skills necessary to grasp Cartesian Meditations and also to understand the sort of problems Being and Time is dealing with. Neither of these ...


6

For Wittgenstein, I would strongly recommend the Philosophical Investigations. This is highly exemplary of the type Rorty is speaking about. For Heidegger, just about anything would fit into this category, but I would recommend you choose a brief text, because skimming Heidegger isn't going to get you anywhere. Perhaps "What is Metaphysics?" would be a ...


6

Bergson's thesis was not that time is space-like, but that time understood "in the common way" is space-like. Bergson argued that practical reasons cause us to regard time as space, but that strictly speaking, the thesis that time is space-like is not merely wrong, but self contradictory. Influences from Aristotle and Kant can be detected in Bergson. For ...


6

Heidegger's idea here is actually not difficult to make out, unlikely as that might appear, if we trace the quotation to its source and check the context. Gavin Rae, 'Overcoming Philosophy: Heidegger, Metaphysics, and the Transformation to Thinking', Human Studies, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Summer 2013), pp. 235-257 : 247 : In The Word of Nietzsche: 'God is Dead,' ...


6

"Being and Time is a long and complex book." We may say that Heidegger's aim in his work is to discover what is common (more fundamental) to various different questions (inquiries) about the existence of objects/entities: Does the table that I think I see before me exist? Does God exist? Does mind, conceived as an entity distinct from body, exist? All ...


5

I've heard (from the Dreyfus Philosophy 185 lectures available on iTunes U) that the Macquarrie and Robinson translation is not necessarily the most accurate. However, that should be balanced against the fact that it's the more commonly used and older translation, and I think for a long time the only translation, and the English terms they've chosen seem ...


5

The German is not at all ambiguous. But part of the problem is that they involve a play-on-words and work from the most basic parts of the German language. I wouldn't get too caught up on holding on to the terms specifically. After all, those are just what one translator decided to go with. As long as you grasp the concept, you can reword this in other ways....


5

Derrida originally used the word deconstruction in Of Grammatology as a way of translating Heidegger’s term Destruktion. Nevertheless Derrida’s deconstruction can definitely be distinguished from Heidegger’s. In both cases, the first idea one must dismiss is the facile notion which has nonetheless become prevalent that either thinker was attempting to “...


5

I enjoyed this question (I would upvote it but don't have the needed reputation yet). I'm not a professional philosopher either, but here is my attempt at your three questions: 1. Under Erasure means that a word is crossed out (literally on the page, as if it were deleted by an editor) but allowed to remain in the final text. This indicates that the word ...


5

It's (probably) important to realise that Heidegger doesn't coin the term "ontotheology." He gets it from Kant, notably in the Lectures on "philosophical theology" where he considers the term as designating that part of theology which "considers God merely in terms of concepts" (Cornell edition, p. 4). Nevertheless, Heidegger makes some fairly bold claims on ...


4

would we be right to approach their views, particularly their ethics, with heightened suspicion and scrutiny on the basis of such evidence? Absolutely. We should not dismiss them out of hand, but try to understand the relationship between their philosophical project and their personal beliefs. One notable example of an attempt along these lines is Jacques ...


4

The opening section of Being and Time tells us that being is not a concept, which means it will not admit of the same sort of definition that a concept like triangle might. Nonetheless, being is that on the basis of which beings are understood as such, that is, always and everywhere when we deal with beings in any way we necessarily approach them on the ...


4

The following is a summary/excerpt of Sorge (Care) in Michael Innes Heideggers Dictionary. Heidegger uses three cognate words in the description of Care: Sorge - properly the anxiety, worry arising out of apprehensions for the future; and refers as much to the inner state as well asexternal cause. Besorgen - to get or provide something for oneself ...


4

I find it useful to read Heidegger with some translation notes as there are several terms that are not easy to translate. For example Stambaugh uses Attunement for Befindlichkeit whereas Macquarrie and Robinson translated this with the phrase state-of-mind, which in my opinion guides the interpretation where it shouldn't go. Befindlichkeit is derived from ...


4

The question 'why is there something rather than nothing?' is a question from Leibniz (Warum ist überhaupt etwas/Seiendes und nicht vielmehr Nichts?), but in Heidegger's reading it can be considered the root of philosophy. This means two things. Chronologically, the Greek philosophers were struck by an experience (Plato: Greek 'thaumazein', usually ...


4

For a relatively short introduction, I'd recommend Heidegger: A Very Short Introduction. And for a longer, but relatively easy commentary on Being and Time, I'd recommend Hubert Dreyfus's Being-in-the-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being and Time, Division I. I wouldn't recommend reading Being and Time itself to beginners. Beside using a difficult ...


4

Sartre did use the expression "existence precedes essence" as a motto, but his implied critical target was not Aristotle's general essence theory. It was, rather, the specific idea of human nature. Sartre's expression was meant to express the existentialist stand, that a human being's way in life is not chosen for him in advance, by his own nature or origin. ...


4

It depends on what you mean by "nothing". Modern physics has shown that empty space has energy ("dark energy") and other properties suggesting that it is "something", even though by any ordinary standards an empty void would be considered "nothing". Physics may indeed be able to explain why, given empty space as we know it, there is something of substance in ...


4

The wording in your quote and the wording in the questions are a bit different, but I'll do my best to address both. First I'm going to extend the quoted bit a little and bring the language of one of your questions into the quotation: Hegel shows the possibility of the historical actualization of spirit "in time" by going back to the identity of the ...


4

Thanks for the referred video. I cannot agree more with l_ruth on the interpretation of what Dreyfus was saying. I post this answer since I do not think l_ruth's response is sufficient to answer the question by Ameet Sharma. The question that needs an answer is this: According to Heidegger, physics can't explain Dasein. Doesn't that make Heidegger a ...


4

According to Wikipedia this being "for whom Being is a question for Heidegger" would be ourselves: Dasein ... is a German word that means "being there" or "presence" (German: da "there"; sein "being"), and is often translated into English with the word "existence". It is a fundamental concept in the existential philosophy of Martin Heidegger, particularly ...


4

"Ontological inquiry is indeed more primordial, as over against the ontical inquiry of the positive sciences." – Martin Heidegger, Being and Time, §3. Heidegger is an ontologist. To define or translate "Being" as "you" or "an entity" is sloppy and incomplete. Heidegger is not talking about the person, the literal being or entity. Rather, he's ...


4

There's a helpful question here on the notion of "freedom toward death" (Can "freedom toward death" have 'freedom' translated out of it?). For this question, I find the first sentence to be a bit imprecise: My "freedom toward death" (Sein und Zeit, p266) is key for authenticity, according to Heidegger. Authenticity for Heidegger is ...


3

It's easy to overstate the relevance of Nietzsche's pronunciation to the terms of classical Theology. When Nietzsche talks about God, he talks about God as a cornerstone of Western Culture, not God as the character of a Christian story. From section 343 of TGS, Nietzsche spells out his intended meaning: The greatest recent event - that God is dead, that ...


3

I believe the soil in question is translated elsewhere as 'ground', and is described in Heidegger's 1929 treatise "On the Essence of Ground". And no, I don't think he intends any reference to the greek circular notion of time. Attaching a couple of quotes from the beginning and near the end of the above mentioned essay (only 39 pages in its entirety), to ...


3

Several points (and I apologise for employing Heideggerese in these points; I hope they are clear enough): Its important to realise that Dasein is in no way equivalent to consciousness. Dasein is defined, in Heidegger's formulation as "that being which in its being is always concerned with its being." Yet, in its everydayness, Dasein is unaware of this ...


3

I haven't viewed Heidegger's critique as important enough to invest much time in it, so I can't provide information on what other philosophers have said regarding his views. But the obvious defects to me seem to be that he posits a dichotomy between aesthetic art as an object to be experienced by a subject and some deeper "presencing" connection, yet he ...


3

How does this differ from the idea of consciousness? In simple terms it differs because it encompasses all that being in the world entails. Heidegger deliberately selected the term from common German language as a way of distancing himself from terms which bring with them a tremendous weight of conceptual 'baggage' from the history of philosophy, and the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible