9

You are right that reading means interpreting, and we can never be sure that we did not misinterpret the author's intentions. But it is as with any human endeavor, we are fallible. The principle of charity only asks that we take the author's perspective seriously and in good faith. Seriousness includes researching historical and cultural background of the ...


5

In my copy* of Meditations the quote reads: Let this always be plain to you, that this piece of land is like any other; and that what is here is the same as what is on top of a mountain, or on the seashore, or wherever you choose; as Plato says of his philosopher, whose retreat is "like a shepherd's fold on a mountain." ...and has an annotation ...


5

Metaphors are usually used in following ways - They can be used when the author cannot describe an event using known words as they fail to be an accurate description. So he uses a word that best fits the description and conveys what he wants to convey. When author wants to instill a poetic feel or playfulness in text to make it more entertaining or ...


4

To me, the main goal of hermeneutics is to derive the meaning of the text as it was originally intended by the author. So, no, we do not have to necessarily say that just because one part is a metaphor, or is meant to be taken allegorically, that it follows the rest be taken in a similar fashion, for it may have been the case the original author intended ...


3

Introduction The short answer is that the "Word of God" shouldn't be read as prayer. Within Biblical hermeneutics, there are two ways to interpret Biblical texts - either exegetically or eisegetically. That is - either one can read meaning out of the text and context into which it was delivered, or they can place their own ideas into the text, bending it ...


3

You have noticed something very important I think. The logos ("word" will do, but it is an inadequate translation) is a sign, but is it really a mere sign, or does it actually participate, actively and ontologically with/in the godhead? If it participates the words of prayer have a real power flowing back and forth from this God. There is a saying in ...


2

The etymological sense of dia-bolic (throwing apart, shattering) is largely overshadowed by the Biblical sense. Luhmann did attempt to rehabilitate it, but without much success. Baraldi et al. in Unlocking Luhmann, p. 232 relate the etymological use in systems theory to that of sym-bolic: "The most important structural characteristic of symbolically ...


2

Lebensreform is not about capitalism per se, but about appropriateness of Lebenswelt to the physical and psychological needs of human Being, ie. the horrible working and living situations that arose in the early days of industrialisation. Essentially, it is a turn against everything that makes humans sick and is tied only to their life circumstances, ie. can ...


2

This is an example of what can be called associative narration, that is common in the texts of continental tradition in philosophy to which Camus belongs. Its aim is to foster understanding rather than to pass information, to invoke what one has in mind in the reader, and to help them explore it for themselves. The text is often structured as a search for ...


2

A metaphor by whom? If there's no God, then that means the Bible isn't divinely inspired, and therefore doesn't have a single author to have intended things to be metaphors or not. Nor is there any reason to assume that parts which suggest that Earth is 6000 years old (for example) or is flat aren't simply mistaken, since it is only that they supposedly ...


2

can the word of God (Christ?) be read as an allegory on how it is that prayer works. Sure, if you want. Unless you happen to live in a place or time that takes heretical notions seriously, there's nothing particular stopping you. If your question is whether there is any literal or liturgical basis for that interpretation then I'm pretty sure the answer is ...


1

Popper was arguing against the conspiracy theory of society: the idea that bad things happen because some sinister group of people actually plans disasters. For example, the great depression was produced deliberately by greedy capitalists because buy more raincoats when they don't have a job or something. Popper claims the conspiracy theory of society makes ...


1

I've found the best way to truly understand a work is to be a part of the ongoing discourse surrounding it -- i.e. try to find an opportunity to write about the work for an audience. Reading with the goal of communicating with others opens the opportunity for a much more rigorous approach. This written dialectic is one of the fundamental activities of the ...


1

It rather depends on you than on the book or things therein. When you find a matching between your mind or soul's ingredients and the interpretants from the book (For interpretant - Refer C.S Pierce on Semiotic), the chance of being convinced increases and so on. God to each soul is likely to be different in some way, despite many could think they are ...


1

In mathematics, there are some problems that are very hard to solve, but where a solution is quite easy to verify. A simple example is that it is often very difficult to find the factorization of a 100 digit number, but quite easy to verify that such a factorization is correct. To be more precise, it is a proven fact that for every positive integer, there ...


1

Main Argument: Many things are done through processing...and many are not! You just discover it or know it! For instance...does someone have to convince you by an argument that you are thirsty or you just know it? Does someone have to convince you that you were created? Same thing for Holy books... Though I do agree that some parts of it are logical, but ...


1

Each person that reads the book is treated to a complete history of their life, including their thoughts and motivations up to and including their thoughts about what they are reading. Revisiting the text, it is updated to include what has happened since the last time they read it.


1

I would have difficulty believing that any text written in a human natural language (HNL) came from a god like the ones described by most religions. The purpose of HNL is to help humans to accomplish human goals, which include acquiring resources, social stability, happiness of self/friends/family, and protection against threats, mostly other humans. Unlike ...


1

It depends on your definition of god. For example, the catholic god has three basic characteristics: all-knowing, all-mighty and eternal. If a book were to convince any rational person that god was its author, it must be some kind of interactive book (probably more of a website) where I could ask anything and get a correct answer, I could command anything ...


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