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In his commentary on the Brahma Sutras, the Sri-Bhasya, Ramanuja says: The word Brahman is derived from the root 'brh' which denotes greatness, and is therefore applicable to all objects which have the quality of greatness, but more aptly to that object which by nature and qualities possesses this greatness to an infinite degree... Brahman is not a name, ...


7

Let me clarify what is not entirely clear from the OP quote but is apparent from the context of the paper: it is not that Indo-Tibetan thinkers do not consider what is known as Gettier cases, it is that they give a different interpretation to them. The essence of the Gettier problem is summarized very lucidly by the author (Stolz): "As long as... ...


5

Brahma is one of the main Hindu deities. Brahman is an abstract concept with a wide meaning. One of its meaning is a hypothetical principle of the universe. A Brahmin is a member of the first of the four classes. Atman again has a wide meaning. One meaning is similar to soul. The main statement of the Indian upanishads is the equation "atman = brahman". ...


5

I only know a bit of what I've looked up on my own, but perhaps I can get you started, although my approach is sure to be skewed as compared to most others, and I may make glaring errors. I don't know if you are deshi; if so, you may be able to correct some of my misunderstandings concerning traditional practices on your own. Also, I am giving a sort of ...


4

IIT Madras provides video lectures on Indian philosophy.The department of Maharishi Vedic Science of Maharishi University of Management provides complete literature of Indian philosophy in sanskrit. A brief list of resources of Indian philosophy is as follows: Introduction to Indian Philosophy Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan - Indian Philosophy - Volume 1-2 A ...


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If enlightenment had such a meaning, all the enlightened persons would sit in some corner without doing anything. But enlightened persons realize the truth about this material world. Many enlightened persons work hard even after their enlightenment without caring about their body. They are supposed that they have transcended the limitations of their body ...


3

The boldface passage is fairly easy to interpret, the rest of the argument not so much. Śri Harsha seems to deal with a one-level ontology similar to scholastics', where attributes (essential properties) are things in their own right. His "nature" seems to correspond to scholastic "essence", the sum total of attributes. To untangle the argument let us ...


3

McEvilley, who is a Sanskrit scholar provides some evidence in his book The Shape of Ancient Thought; I'd also suggest that the art of Gandhara shows a definite mingling between Greek and Indian philosophies - but this is after Alexander's empire building. Another possible line of attack is through religous texts; given the duty to preserve texts; and that ...


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I would assume that the Bibliothèque nationale de France would hold a copy of such an edition, if it were to exist-- but a search of their catalogues shows nothing of the sort. It's pretty difficult to prove a negative, but I'd doubt that there is such a translation. Else, how explain that such a fundamental text does not have a (full) French translation?...


2

I would recommend also The Shape of Ancient Thought: Comparative Studies in Greek and Indian Philosophies by Thomas McEvilley. While being a product of an admirable research on the influence of the Ancient Greek and Indian thoughts on each other, it also provides a smooth initiation into the Indian tradition of philosophy for one who is quite unfamiliar with ...


2

Corruption here means miscegenation or mesalliances with people of lower class, caste or status as well as prostitution or slavery etc. A warrior who runs away from battle disgraces his family. His sons and daughters will find it difficult to find marriage partners of equal status. Moreover, the women of the family may feel demoralized. A daughter who knows ...


2

I do not know how Prabhavananda supports his thesis "Hindu thought exercises a strong influence upon the minds of early Western thinkers." What are his arguments and examples? The first known contact between India and Greek in the domain of religious thinking and philosophical speculation are known from the Hellenistic period, after Alexander's conquering ...


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This answer was too long for a comment. At hinduism.stackexchange.com you will get emic answers to this question. Here the answers are more likely to be etic. As a side note, as a linguaphile I discourage concurrently learning words that either sound similar or have totally opposite meanings. In my experience, I forget or am apprehensive about which is ...


2

The advaita philosophy is often summarized by advaita commentators with one quote from Adi Sankara. It is verse 20 from his Brahmajnanavali-mala. It goes: Brahman is the Truth, the universe is false, the jiva (individual self) is, indeed, Brahman, not another; By this should be known the Truth of the scripture; Thus is the drumbeat of Vedanta. Swami ...


2

Wikipedia describes spiritual enlightenment as follows: Enlightenment is the "full comprehension of a situation". The term is commonly used to denote the Age of Enlightenment, but is also used in Western cultures in a religious context. It translates several Buddhist terms and concepts, most notably bodhi, kensho and satori. Related terms from Asian ...


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Brahmin The Hindu caste system has four Varna : Brahmins: priests, scholars and teachers Kshatriyas: rulers, warriors and administrators Vaishyas: agriculturalists and merchants Shudras: laborers and service providers The Brahmin caste are thus the caste that produced the clergy in traditional Hindu society. Brahma Hinduism has three primary Gods, known ...


2

In Western critical theory (the current evolute of the post-modernist/post-structuralist type thinking), they often harp on the idea of a 'language world': a superimposition of human language and human concepts on the 'natural' world. Their point is that it is this 'language world' that we live in, not the 'natural' world. For example, if I pick up a hammer, ...


2

In Hindu thought all minds are manifestations of a fundamental unified awareness, Brahman. In dualistic traditions the manifestations are separate to Brahman. In non-dual traditions they are not separate. I would say this is different to solipsism, because Brahman gains new real knowledge from the interaction of these manifestations. There is both ...


1

The fourth verse of the Gita Dhyana Sloka reads as follows: Sarvopanishado gaavo dogdhaa gopaalanandanah; Paartho vatsah sudheer bhoktaa dugdham geetaamritam mahat. All the Upanishads are the cows; the milker is Krishna; the cowherd boy, Partha (Arjuna), is the calf; men of purified intellect are the drinkers; the milk is the great nectar of ...


1

Assuming that the translation is correct, first write all definitions. Ignorance: lack of knowledge or information. Epistemology: the theory of knowledge, especially with regard to its methods, validity, and scope. Epistemology is the investigation of what distinguishes justified belief from opinion. Phenomenon: a fact or situation that is observed to ...


1

Confused and welcome to PSE. Aristotelian aitiai and Hindu causes It is traditional to refer to Aristotle's 'four causes' but 'cause' isn't the best translation of Aristotle's term, aition, except possibly in the case of the so-called efficient cause. Since Aristotle was not talking about causes, it might be supposed that any link with causes and effects ...


1

The following excerpt from the Pāli Canon shows that reincarnation is actually not essential to Buddhism, so although Buddhism arose in a time when the prevailing mindset held reincarnation as a given, it is not intrinsic. Cula-Malunkyovada Sutta: The Shorter Instructions to Malunkya "So, Malunkyaputta, remember what is undeclared by me as undeclared, ...


1

... my question is, have there been any thinkers who have formed a theory of reality which takes into account not just data from the waking state but also what the mind experiences in the dreaming state and the state of deep sleep? In Ludwig Binswanger's Dream and Existence he blurs the distinction between subjective thought and dreaming and hardens the ...


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I recently heard an interesting story on NPR you might be enjoy: http://www.radiolab.org/story/182747-wake-up-dream/ In particular they spoke to Steve LaBerge, author of, "Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming" and he speaks of Dr. William C. Dement who has done some very interesting research in the area of sleep and dreaming. There is plenty of empirical ...


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The latest components of the Vedas are teachings called Upanishads. To a large part they are agnostic and speculate about general principles of our world. Broadly speaking, the Upanishads are teaching a grand unification, expressed in the doctrine Atman = Brahman. Here Atman denotes the individual person, while Brahman denotes a fundamental principle ...


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Satcitananda. Roughly: truth, consciousness, bliss. That's it. Not surprisingly however, Satcitananda has a Wikipedia! And I would particularly draw your attention to the Discussion section of the Wikipedia article. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satcitananda I was trying to get across that it is something realized rather than learned through ...


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I'd say the most sophisticated philosophical tradition from India is Buddhist thought. Janism, Sikhism & Buddhism, actively are considered reform movements within Sanatam Dharma by Indians, and there is validity to that though it involves taking a highly pluralistic stance about the tradition (also justifiable!). The Buddhist emperor Ashoka was the ...


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