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First, Define Philosophy I would argue, contra some of the answers above, that what we call philosophy is, perhaps arbitrarily, a specific historical tradition usually traced to Thales and the Pythagoreans, who probably originated the word. It requires, at a minimum, writing and geometry or some elements of axiomized math. It isn't simply that we cannot ...


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Your question is rather simple and general at one level, but in historical specificity complex, never fully definable, and rife with paradoxes, such as the "dictatorship of the proletariate." I see that the mention of communism has elicited the usual misleading "gulag" rants, so I offer another point of view. Dictatorship may be thought ...


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Dictatorship: Government by a dictator where one person has almost absolute political authority over rules and the law. Democracy: A system of government by the whole population or all the eligible members of a state, typically through elected representatives. Communism: A political theory derived from Karl Marx, advocating class war and leading to a society ...


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Oppenheimer is known for having quoted the Bhagavad Gita at the first atom bomb test: "Now I am become death [literally: `the world-destroying time], the destroyer of worlds" He later said: "In some sort of crude sense which no vulgarity, no humour, no overstatements can quite extinguish, the physicists have known sin; and this is a ...


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The Evil Demon or Descartes' demon is an entity that has the power to fully and utterly deceive, basically making up all of your perceptions so there is nothing at all you can possibly be sure of as being real. It provides an argument to doubt everything, including your own senses and experiences.


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Rereading a few pages from Chap. 7 of The World makes the above questioning really puzzling. Did Descartes ever defend his choice to accept something as muddled as motion in his philosophy? Something which contemporary mathematicians had just an inchoate understanding of, and handled in a mysterious, "occult" conceptual framework? Descartes ...


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You can read this reference Newton's critique of Descartes's Theory of Motion Carmical, Alex W. Purdue University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2010. https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/dissertations/AAI3413777/ and The Descartes-Newton paradox: Clashing theories of planetary motion at the turn of the eighteenth century Jean-SeĢbastien Spratt Vassar College ...


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