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Welcome, Joseph Lutz The quote comes, as you probably know, from Basic Concepts of Aristotelian Philosophy, p. 4 of the Metcalf & Tanzer translation, Indiana University Press, 2009. Philosophy contra biography As always with Heidegger one is inclined to hesitate but in this case I think Heidegger's standpoint is straightforward. He is marginalising ...


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Well, whether Heidegger provided a rationale explicitly for that statement is a matter of historical research, and might not even be an easy task to an expert of Heidegger to prove. But, if you read a lot of philosophy, it's essentially a statement on an approach to studying philosophy which emphasizes the importance of ideas over historical narrative. Did ...


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The evolutionary biologist (and student of the history of science), Stephen Jay Gould writes in his book Eight Little Piggies: Reflections in Natural History, chapter entitled Darwin and Paley Meet the Invisible Hand: Where did Darwin get such a radical version of evolution? Surely not from the birds and bees, the twigs and trees. Nature helped, but ...


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The notion of evolution in the sense of different species descending from a common ancestor predates Hegel, Darwin's contribution was the theory of natural selection to explain how the process happens, along with lots of empirical evidence for common descent and local adaptive processes such as Darwin's finches. Darwin's own grandfather Erasmus Darwin (1731 -...


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Darwin I should have thought that Darwin's theory of evolution does not recognise anything like an 'arc of history'; that evolution is not progressive, and that it moves with no purpose (cf. R.Dawkins, The Blind Watchmaker). Darwinian evolution, working causally through random variation and natural selection, is naturalistic, non-directional and non-...


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It is quite possible that connections between Hegel's Absolute Idealism and (some sense of) realism can be drawn out. But there is a fundamental divide between the two in the or a standard sense of 'realism'. It develops as follows. Realism in most forms assumes the existence of a mind-independent world of which we can have knowledge. So for realism, mind ...


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According to WP, Hegel is a proponent of absolute idealism. To wit: It is Hegel's account of how being is ultimately comprehensible as an all-inclusive whole (das Absolute). Hegel asserted that in order for the thinking subject (human reason or consciousness) to be able to know its object (the world) at all, there must be in some sense an identity of ...


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To suggest a different perspective, Whitehead writes the following: (page 8-9) The Reformation and the scientific movement were two aspects of the historical revolt which was the dominant intellectual movement of the later Renaissance. The appeal to the origins of Christianity, and Francis Bacon's appeal to efficient causes as against final causes, were ...


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I associate the term, 'properly basic belief', like Conifold, with Alvin Plantinga as its prime modern proponent. See for a start, see A. Plantinga, Warranted Christian Belief [WCB], Oxford: OUP, 2000: 81. So that we can be quite clear what we are talking about, let's characterise the idea of a properly basic belief. We need to distinguish it from any ...


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I like Geoffrey Thomas's answer, and would add. Mathematicians and rationalists more generally have always chased after certainty of reason. Plato was perhaps the first mathematical foundationalist who attempted to deal with infinite regress by creating a distinct, objective reality for abstraction with his theory of forms. For over two thousand years, ...


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Interesting question. I think one part of the answer is that logicians and mathematicians such as Frege were concerned to remove 'psychologism' from their subjects. Psychologism in its various form is a set of views : about the relationship between psychology and logic, but its traditional form holds that the laws of logic are grounded in psychological ...


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About first I dont know Here are some Roland Barthes quotes in the direction you seek though not literally I am interested in language because it wounds or seduces me Language is a skin: I rub my language against the other. It is as if I had words instead of fingers, or fingers at the tip of my words. My language trembles with desire Language is ...


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Wittgenstein already sees the positivistic notion of 'words as object descriptions' as false. But he would probably not make the leap automatically from subjectivity to emotion. (There is a lot of space in between.) Words are moves in a game, and the collaborators determine the rules by participating. Those rules go way beyond description, and even when ...


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The critique by Nick Shackleton-Jones is on Dennetts dogmatic rationalism. At one point he writes: Dennett actually says of Intuition Pumps: ‘when you read what I write, you download a new app to your necktop’. Really? And how did that work out? You might think I am being a little harsh on Dennett who, as far as one can tell, is a decent chap – but it ...


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Skimming though that link, I'm not at all certain that idea is tied to a particular school of thought. This is critical book review, and reviewers often speak from loose conceptual structures rather than tight analytical positions. The idea Shackleton-Jones is trying to get across is that Dennett's description of 'words' is both inaccurate and hypocritical: ...


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In the world of mathematics, there are postulates and theorems which with time have been settled i.e., rigorously proven to be true or discarded as false. Those known mathematical facts then furnish the basis for further mathematical reasoning; in this sense, mathematics has been incrementally built up over time via the accumulation of such knowledge. In ...


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Philosophy and science should not be confused. In philosophy something may be proven or demonstrated. As Edward Feser puts it (page 235), philosophical arguments are more like (though of course not exactly like) the proofs of geometry than they are like the probabilistic hypotheses put forward in empirical science. One could, of course, try to show that ...


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You're a little confused about what is meant by natural motion here. It means motion without the presence of any forces, including gravity. It's easy enough to see that there are three possible natural motions of an object in a straight line, because which direction should it choose to move in? In a wave, because it moves in all directions at once ...


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Based on the anti-spirituality items (1,3,6), the interest in mathematics (2), the interest in self-help (5,6) and the interest in naturalism (4), you might look at some of the following tags on this site to see if the kind of questions are interesting: philosophy-of-science philosophy-of-mathematics philosophy-of-mind philosophy-of-religion Although the ...


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