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The are two issue to bring up here (from IEP) (1) you seem to assume that Bacon's visions of science is what happens in reality. Some beg to differ e.g.: [Bacon's method proposals made] the English physician (and neo-Aristotelian) William Harvey, of circulation-of-the-blood fame, to quip that Bacon wrote of natural philosophy “like a Lord Chancellor” – ...


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As @AdamSharpe commented, this is Pope Paul III! On a hunch that the face had been flipped horizontally for the GIF's aesthetics, I even ran the reverse image searches on the mirror-imaged face, but still got no results. I guess the next mystery is why the reverse searches failed on an apparently clear-cut test!


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Francis Bacon is such a key and fascinating figure in the history of science. Newton showed that great predictions of motions are not enough to liberate us from superstitions like alchemy and seeking bible codes. In Bacon's time, there was no concept if a detective, which arrived with Conan Doyle. I would say Bacon is grasping for that role, in so far as it ...


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Some of my observations/opinions: Describing philology as "love of learning" seem overly broad to me; surely that's not what the academic discipline of philology is. Wikipedia says that it: is more commonly defined as the study of literary texts as well as oral and written records, the establishment of their authenticity and their original form, ...


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There's a branch of philosophy called philosophy of language which is closely related to Philology and you may take a look. Personally I'll view philosophy is innately related to any field including philology, but the borderline normally lies in whether it's non-disputed scientifically or empirically proved knowledge or not... Regarding your first ...


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since gods are supposedly good and want goodness And therein lies your problem. For a polytheistic pantheon where gods embody aspects of human nature, what each god wants will be different. Greek and Roman myth is entirely centered on conflicts between the gods. And some gods (Bacchus, Anansi, Loki) are explicitly defined as tricksters. In polytheism ...


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The natural sequence seemed to me that there is this idea of goodness... and since gods are supposedly good and want goodness... they would love things that are good. The argument basically comes in two versions, be it the one that your title describes (that the facts' existence would have a divine cause), or the claim that, without following a specific ...


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Your understanding of Euthyphro sounds inverted. At the time, the idea that "good" was just a name for what the gods approve of was a commonplace. Plato's goal here, in fact, is to replace the arbitrary and often contradictory morality of Greek mythology with a more perfect, abstract, consistent and eternal philosophical notion of "good" ...


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Just to keep this in a Platonic vein, whenever we consider a moral concept, we are considering an ideal. So, when we say it is morally correct — or in Socrates' terminology, virtuous — to do X in case Y, what we mean is that there is an ideal form of being that naturally does X in case Y, and that we should strive to attain that ideal form for ourselves. But ...


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Analytic Philosophy: An Anthology ed. Martinich and Sosa includes the following seminal papers: Part I :Philosophy of Language. 1 “On Sense and Reference”(Gottlob Frege). 2 “Thought”(Gottlob Frege. 3 “On Denoting”(Bertrand Russell). 4 “On Referring”(P. F. Strawson). 5 “Meaning”(H. P. Grice). 6 “Truth and Meaning”(Donald Davidson). 7 “Identity and Necessity”(...


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An idiom used in literary and philosophical contexts derives from the myth of Sisyphus itself (the Greek original, not Camus' version), Sisyphean task or labor. Camus gave the myth an additional connotation related to the conception of life's absurdity in existentialism. Etymonline traces its English use back to 1590-s (spelled "Sisyphian" ...


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Cyclic cosmologies, like the dharmachakra and the bhavacakra of Buddhist thought, imply or illustrate this, although in the context of pointing beyond to a different way to be. Antinatalism is arguably one response to perception of life as an endless treadmill. You could point to consciousness as at odds pr potentially so, to the Darwinian requirement that ...


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