6 votes

What is the difference between the idea of the "social contract" in Hobbes and Locke?

The source of differences between Hobbes’ and Locke’ social contracts is their differing conceptions of the state of nature. For Hobbes absolute freedom is all that individuals have in the state of ...
Nanhee Byrnes PhD's user avatar
3 votes
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Is there a difference between will and free will?

In Leviathan Hobbes attempts a definition of freedom compatible with his deterministic views. "Freedom" in this book is to be understood as "political freedom", not "...
armand's user avatar
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2 votes
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Question about Hobbes' distinction between Error and Absurdity

See Leviathan, Chapter V : Of Reason and Science : when we reason in words of general signification, and fall upon a general inference which is false; though it be commonly called error, it is indeed ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
2 votes
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What does Hobbes mean by the use of the word "Fancy" in Leviathan?

The meaning is: "dream", "chimera". See Primary/secondary quality distinction and Mechanism. The idea is that our way to "see" and perceive the properties of things ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
2 votes
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Question on Locke and Hobbes's views on private property

Both Hobbes and Locke were responding to a particular problematic of the 17th century. At that time, commoners were beginning to develop substantial wealth, through foreign adventures, commercial ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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2 votes
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Did Hobbes start social contract theory?

The general sentiment is that while Hobbes had precursors he was the first to systematically develop and defend a theory of "social contract" (so named a century later after the title of ...
Conifold's user avatar
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2 votes

Who originally made a coherent argument that government is inevitable because in "anarchy" a government would come about anyway?

I think the closest you'll find to an origin is Jean-Jacques Rousseau and his Social Contract theory. Both Hobbes and Locke thought that anarchy was the natural state of mankind — though granted, ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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1 vote

Does Thomas Hobbes assert that political philosophy or civic philosophy as it was known then, began with him?

You're right to be skeptical. While Hobbes was super important in political philosophy, he didn't actually invent the whole field. The idea that he did likely comes from a few things. First, he had a ...
Groovy's user avatar
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1 vote
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What is the Common Good According to Hobbes?

The common good = salus publica = common welfare is the superior principle, the souverain has to follow in his political decision, see Chapter 30 of Leviathan following the keyword Salus populi. The ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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1 vote

The private language argument and Descartes's private thoughts

See this answer to a closely related question: How serious are believers in the private language argument? Your question is focused on what appear to be the flaws in W's "error correction" ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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1 vote

Who originally made a coherent argument that government is inevitable because in "anarchy" a government would come about anyway?

The modern term used by political scientists that by metaphor suggests that government is inevitable is 'power vacuum': In political science and political history, the term power vacuum, also known ...
J D's user avatar
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1 vote

Who originally made a coherent argument that government is inevitable because in "anarchy" a government would come about anyway?

Aristole argued that the state is a creation of nature due to our (human's) "function" as a political animal. TLDR, a state of some kind is inevitable due to our rational (political) nature. ...
horzion's user avatar
  • 66
1 vote

Inquiring about Perspectives on the Theory of "the People" as a Political Concept

Interesting question. At the risk of explicitly disobeying your request, I'm going to link to my answer which makes the case in reference to Hobbes and Rousseau, that how we interpret 'human nature' ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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1 vote

Inquiring about Perspectives on the Theory of "the People" as a Political Concept

Ernest Renan's What is a Nation? comes to mind, being concise, more recent than the authors OP references and borrowing from them. To Renan a nation is composed of people who continually accept to be ...
armand's user avatar
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1 vote

Is Hobbes describing a 0th or 1st Law of Nature here?

IMO there is no contradiction between two "first" Laws of Nature. The underlying distinction is that stated by Hobbes into Chapter XIV about right: "the liberty each man hath to use his ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
1 vote

Who originally made a coherent argument that government is inevitable because in "anarchy" a government would come about anyway?

That heavily depends on how you define "anarchy", "government", "state" and "power" and depending on your choice of definition that might not even be true to ...
haxor789's user avatar
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1 vote
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Why is the Hobbesian leviathan less fearful than the state of nature?

In Leviathan, c.13, Hobbes depicts the state of nature as 'a warre of every man, against every man' (Tuck: 88). (All references listed at end of Answer.) Exactly what is the state of nature and what ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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1 vote

What does it mean when Hobbes says “round quadrangle” signifies nothing?

See the full paragraph of Leviathan, Ch.IV On speech: "when men make a name of two names, whose significations are contradictory and inconsistent; as this name, an incorporeal body [...]. For ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
1 vote

What is the difference between the idea of the "social contract" in Hobbes and Locke?

The nature of the social contract is the question here, not the state of nature - though this has background relevance. An old text - Pollock's - is highly illuminating. Hobbes's Original Contract ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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1 vote

How do Aristotle and Hobbes differ in their conceptions of the human good?

Aristotle Aristotle has a teleological view of human nature and of the human good. The nature of human beings is such that they have certain inherent capacities - potentialities - in the realisation ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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