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Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

Mainly because we have no idea how mind and matter are supposed to interact Causation is understood by many in a way that makes that problematic. This post gives a perfectly neutral definition which ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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12 votes
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Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

The key difference between matter-matter interactions and mind-matter interactions is that we have been able to discover governing relationships (eg Newton's laws, Coulomb's law, General Relativity ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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10 votes

What were the reactions to Hume's problem of induction from scientists practicing in the field?

I can't speak for people in the 18th century, but there isn't really much for scientists to do about it. The principle of induction has proven to be exceedingly useful for predicting things, and for ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
9 votes

How do empiricists explain the existence of perceptual illusions?

I think that empiricists would not deny that they may be deceived. Indeed, philosophy of science generally holds an "all models are wrong" sort of attitude. The key defining aspect of ...
Him's user avatar
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7 votes

What am I missing in texts that say things that are so obvious as to seem pointless?

When something appears so obvious that it is uninteresting and yet one knows that others do not find it obvious at all, what one may be missing is understanding what is at stake for them. Why do they ...
Frank Hubeny's user avatar
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7 votes

Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

I agree, the interaction problem is not unique to mind/body questions. For example, the original materialism posited everything was atoms colliding. However, now we know nothing collides, all ...
yters's user avatar
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What is the contrast between Hume's and Locke's philosophies of science?

There are two related major differences between Locke and Hume, their focus and their conception of science. Locke's is focused on the knowledge new experimental science provides, he is interested in ...
Conifold's user avatar
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6 votes
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Who was the Philosopher who said to jump into the fire if you think it is not real?

How about this? The celebrated Arab commentator Avicenna (ibn Sīnā, 980–1037) confronts the LNC [Law of Noncontradiction] skeptic...: “As for the obstinate, he must be plunged into fire, since ...
Mark Andrews's user avatar
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6 votes

Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

Not everyone has an "inner monologue" or ability to vividly imagine things: this is known as aphantasia. At an imaginary-angled diagonal from that, there are also people who are pain-...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
6 votes

Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

So there's this supposedly an 'interaction' problem for substance dualism, that isn't there for physicalism or idealism. I've never understood this. So as Hume pointed out, we see event a followed by ...
J D's user avatar
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6 votes

If laws are just descriptions of reality, is it a miracle that things are regular?

As others have pointed out, the most we can normally do is to describe the things we see. We may, one day, find a set of laws that are sufficiently precise to describe everything we see. We may hope ...
Richard Kirk's user avatar
5 votes

How does Kant respond to Hume's problem of induction?

The answer above (by @PVJ), although broadly correct, is too imprecise to understand the depth of Kant's answer. It, of course, involves causality, but not in a banal manner. For Kant it doesn't ...
abracadabra's user avatar
5 votes

Hume on matter of fact

Hume's view is that ideas derive from impressions, meaning roughly and to take an example that I cannot have the idea of blue unless I have had sensory experience (impression) of the colour. The idea ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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5 votes
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Is Goodman's new riddle of induction a restatement of Hume's problem of induction?

Goodman's claim is that Hume has missed the main point about how observing past examples provides confirmation of laws. To appeal to the uniformity of nature is either vacuous or false. The future ...
Bumble's user avatar
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5 votes

Does Popper's falsification view of the problem of induction have any implications for the NEW riddle of induction?

Goodman's new riddle of induction is old wine in new bottles. The substance behind the problem of induction is the following. People imagine that they arrive at theories by looking at evidence and ...
alanf's user avatar
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5 votes

What's wrong with this reconstruction of Nagarjuna?

In his book The Fundalmental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nagarjuna's Malamadhyamakakarika, Jay L. Garfield writes for his translation and commentary on this verse: The essence of entities Is ...
Swami Vishwananda's user avatar
5 votes

Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

Mind is software, the brain hardware. Back in 1973, when I used to write drivers for hardware on an HP2100 minicomputer, we had hardware instructions that wrote to devices and read from them (I/O ...
Simon Crase's user avatar
4 votes

Is anyone now writing philosophy in the style of Plato - the Dialogue?

Here are a few examples of books using the dialogue form: Worlds Apart: A Dialogue of the 1960's by Owen Barfield (1963) is written in the form of a fictional dialogue. Corydon by André Gide (1911) ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
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4 votes

What was Kant's particular rejection of the virtue of benevolence based in?

For Kant motives other than duty are morally unworthy. He held this view, because these other kinds of motives depend upon some condition. He calls them hypothetical imperatives. They generally have ...
paschep's user avatar
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4 votes
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Empiricism out the door

David Hume wrote this line in his character Cleanthes's voice, in Part One of Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion: Whether your scepticism be as absolute and sincere as you pretend, we shall ...
ChristopherE's user avatar
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4 votes

What does Hume mean by "genius"?

See the etymology of genius: Sense of "characteristic disposition" of a person is from 1580s. Meaning "person of natural intelligence or talent" and that of "exalted natural mental ability" are ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
4 votes
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Why can't uniformity of nature (in principle) be proven deductively?

The quoted passage is part of an exposition of Hume's original argument. One of the previous paragraphs explains what "deductively" meant to Hume: "The deductive system that Hume had at hand was ...
Conifold's user avatar
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4 votes
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Does Popper's falsification view of the problem of induction have any implications for the NEW riddle of induction?

Here is my understanding of Karl Popper and Nelson Goodman. Both talk about whether and when observations may corroborate a given hypothesis. Popper concludes that observations may falsify, but never ...
Mark Andrews's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why is Hume struggling to reconcile causality with his notion of what is knowable?

It was an epistemological problem, Hume's theory of impressions and ideas was a bit too simplistic to describe human cognition realistically, which is understandable given the state of psychology at ...
Conifold's user avatar
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4 votes

Moral skepticism and "walking the talk"

Psychology I don't think a philosophy site is the best place to explain the psychology of philosophers' practical stance(s) towards morality. But some response can be made. Fact/ value distinction ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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4 votes
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Hume: excavating the is/ ought gap

The limits of means/ end reasoning 'Ought' operates in a variety of contexts outside means/ end (instrumental) reasoning. Take the case of : 'The train ought to arrive by 21.00hrs'. This means that ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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4 votes

Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

I am not sure if I have an answer as much as some considerations you can make about this topic. Who saw the event A? First I want to talk about what it means to observe events A and B. If the sun ...
Tomáš Zato's user avatar
4 votes

Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

The interaction problem was brought to René Descartes' attention by his pupil, Princess Elisabeth. Her argument is that of all material phenomena heretofore observed, it has always been matter on ...
Hudjefa's user avatar
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4 votes

Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

The issue with trying to use science as described to tease out the rules of mind-matter interaction is collecting the data points of the mind. We have no measurement devices to take data like we do ...
Rick's user avatar
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4 votes

Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

Put aside "how" matter influences matter. The question is whether the laws of physics (as we know them) leave any room for "mind" to influence matter. If you believe that mind can ...
Steven Gubkin's user avatar

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