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In his book The Fundalmental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nagarjuna's Malamadhyamakakarika, Jay L. Garfield writes for his translation and commentary on this verse: The essence of entities Is not present in the conditions, etc... If there is no essence, There can be no otherness-essence. [Garfield's commentary] The point being made ...


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Perhaps the major difference is that Hume derives from experience whatever categories he uses - or supposes that he does so. To take causation as a star example: Hume derives the category of causation from experience in the following way. When event A is prior to event B (priority); when A and B are close in space and time (contiguity); and when A-type ...


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Welcome, JorgeAmVF Treatise I & EHU It would be a mega-task to work out the full relation of Treatise I to EHU - and the outcome certainly not beyond challenge. The following extract from an article by Phillip Cummins throws some light, however. Four main point are involved : ... In closing may I suggest that [1 - GLT] Hume disowned the Treatise ...


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It would help if you were to clarify whether you are being asked what Hume's position was, or what you think about Hume's argument. Assuming the former: In Hume's day, it was common to use the word 'inductive' as complementary to deductive, making 1 true. This is no longer common, however. Abductive inference, for example, is neither, although some ...


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At least ever since Anaximander of Miletus, who introduced the notion of apeiron, man is well aware of the definite need to get to grips with boundlessness and its kin. One of the critical issues raised in this problematic is whether infinity is a complete and real object, that, for example arithmetically, we could denote by a numeral 'ω' just as we denote ...


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Hume's Law has been taken to be at least one of the following: (i) an ought judgement is deducible only from an evaluative judgement; (ii) an ought judgement is deducible only from a prescriptive judgement; (iii) an ought judgement is deducible only from another ought judgement; (iv) an ought judgement is not deducible from a ...


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A major problem Berkeley would face today was actually solved in his time with what I would actually consider one of the most elegant solution to a philosophical argument ever proposed. In a famous incident, Ronald Knox raised a major criticism to Berkley with a limerick: There once was a man who said "God Must think it exceedingly odd If he finds ...


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"Inconsistency" is too assertive a word for philosophy. Let me draw an analogy between philosophy and chess. In master-level chess, there are strong and weak moves, rarely, there are right or wrong moves (mostly, they occur in cramped positions with very few choices). Likewise in philosophy, there are strong or weak arguments, incipient or mature views, but ...


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The moral rationalism with which Hume is concerned in the Treatise is roughly the view that reason can both ascertain the proper (morally correct) goals of action and motivate us to pursue - to act on - them. In effect you ask why, on what grounds, Hume denies that even if reason could ascertain the goals of action (which it can't), it could not motivate us ...


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Any commentator on 17th- or 18th-century philosophy is likely to have problems with the concept of an 'idea', which is many-ways ambiguous - often in the same writer. Descartes In the Meditations Descartes distinguishes three kinds of ideas: 1.Innate (ideae innatae) 2.Adventitious (ideae adventitiae) 3.Invented by myself (a me ipso factae) In Descartes' view ...


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Hume was deeply skeptical of metaphysics. For a non-philosopher this includes topics such as being, essence, substance, space, time, the self, and causation. For example: in A Treatise of Human Nature Hume argues that we have no innate concept of Cause and Effect (C\E) and that C\E is not rationally known but instead we develop the concept of it through ...


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If Hume claims that the only vice is murder, then he can restrict the discussion to murder. However, if Hume is making a claim about vice in general, and Hume acknowledges that there are actions other than murder than are correctly classified as vices, then we are free to consider other examples of vices. Consider the example of cheating in a sporting ...


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