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In what fundamental ways, if any, does Husserl break with Kant?

It should be said that Husserl was philosophically averse to Kant's "creative" transcendental subject, perhaps due to the dominance of absolute idealist interpretations of him at the time, ...
Conifold's user avatar
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7 votes

Where did Husserl say that in quantum mechanics spatial localisation is no longer a principle of individualisation?

I suspect that Petitot is misremembering and interpolating. Husserl did generally consider (formal) metaphysics to be the doctrine of individuation. For example, in a 1918 letter to Weyl, thanking him ...
Conifold's user avatar
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In what fundamental ways, if any, does Husserl break with Kant?

Husserl, Edmund: The crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology (1936) has some paragraphs dealing explicitly with the transcendental philosophy of Kant: See §25 about Kant's ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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What is the distinction between Gegenstand and Objekt?

In German philosophy, the terms Gegenstand and Objekt are used to refer to different aspects of the concept of an object. In general, the term Gegenstand refers to the relation between a subject and ...
Yoel Schvarcz's user avatar
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Did Sellars's argument against the Myth of the Given successfully challenge Husserl's phenomenology?

There is something to it, but things are more complicated. Sellars was not arguing against Husserl specifically, it is unlikely that he was even familiar with his phenomenology. He does draw on the ...
Conifold's user avatar
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6 votes

What does Husserl mean by essences?

Absolutely not. Heidegger's "essence of Dasein" is really a misnomer to make a point, by stating that Dasein's essence is existence he upends the traditional use of "essence" as form, idea, the ...
Conifold's user avatar
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5 votes

Can we imagine a perfect circle?

Chalmers does not mean ordinary visual imagination (our faculty to create representations which faintly resemble real visual sense impressions). Instead he means something like forming a concept, ...
viuser's user avatar
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5 votes
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Are there philosophic discussions of Husserl's dissertation?

Husserl's dissertation Beiträge zur Variationsrechnung (“Contributions to the Calculus of Variations”) has nothing philosophical in it. The work is based on the lectures by Kronecker and Weierstrass ...
Carlo Ierna's user avatar
4 votes

Husserl's Cartesian Mediations

I have in general had difficulties with the series your first book belongs to, if that's any consolation. You could try : Dermot Moran, 'Edmund Husserl: Founder of Phenomenology', London : Polity, ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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4 votes

What does Husserl say about 'space'?

Mature Husserl is usually seen as a mild anti-realist, but this is largely due to the maxim that phenomenology should be neutral (agnostic) on metaphysical matters because it is the data it produces ...
Conifold's user avatar
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4 votes

For Husserl, how can we know things in themselves?

The broader question is answered under In what fundamental ways, if any, does Husserl break with Kant? As for the title question, the answer is that we can not. Husserl's "things themselves" are ...
Conifold's user avatar
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3 votes

In what ways is Merleau-Ponty following (late/unpublished) Husserl?

Good question, except that the answer is worth at least one or two doctoral theses. The question is way above my own amateur level, so perhaps this should just be a comment. However, as far as I ...
Nelson Alexander's user avatar
2 votes

Starting on Husserl and Merleau-Ponty

Alp Uzman's answer is great, Robert Sokolowski's Introduction to Phenomenology is truly second to none resource for beginners. It describes nearly all Husserlian methods and terms. You should ...
bodhihammer's user avatar
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2 votes

Starting on Husserl and Merleau-Ponty

My humble suggestion would be Robert Sokolowski's Introduction to Phenomenology. I haven't read Moran's introduction, but a quick look at the contents suggests he chases names and texts. Sokolowski's ...
Alp Uzman's user avatar
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2 votes

Are Husserl and Heidegger's conceptions of finitude in any way similar?

The observation of commonality is correct, but the influence goes the other way around, Husserl's entire lifeworld turn owes much to his interaction with Heidegger, originally his student. The concept ...
Conifold's user avatar
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2 votes

How does one perform phenomenological reduction?

The following account of Husserlian phenomenological reduction might make clearer what is involved in the reduction. Some of Husserl's characterisations of the reduction come close to examples; and in ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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2 votes
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Does Phenomenology Reject The Existence of Mediating Concepts?

Your two questions are similar in nature and the your intuition seems more or less correct that most modern phenomenologists hold the position of some types of direct realism (naive, enactivism, ...
Double Knot's user avatar
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2 votes
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What does "pre-predicative" mean in the context of Husserl's Cartesian Meditations <52>?

From the concluding sentence of your same reference: Consequently evidence of the ex-pression is also a determining part of the idea of scientific truth, as predicative complexes that are, or can be, ...
Double Knot's user avatar
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2 votes

Why is psychology a parallel to natural science?

Natural sciences are grounded in what is called scientific method, which implies studying properties that are common to many objects and experimentally reproducible. In essence, science implies ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
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2 votes
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Questions on Phenomenology

First, one should make a clear distinction between philosophical texts and encyclopedia entries. Heidegger did not write this entry so we can't really ask what he meant by such or such excerpt. One ...
Johan's user avatar
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1 vote

A question on Husserl and animals in relation to psychology

The history of psychology has principally been the science of being mean to rats.. It sounds like he is expressing doubt about our access to the interiority of animals (top-down psychology, as opposed ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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1 vote

A few questions on Phenomenology

From Daniel Pimbé ( a retired university level teacher also author of Karl Popper : The Forbidden Explanation - L'explication interdite) Link to Pimbé's full article on his personal site " ...
Vince Vickler's user avatar
1 vote

A few questions on Phenomenology

Phenomenological reduction, also known as epoché, is a method used in phenomenology to suspend judgment about the existence of the objects of experience, allowing the conscious experience itself to be ...
Yoel Schvarcz's user avatar
1 vote

A few questions on Phenomenology

In Husserlian transcendental phenomenology, each reduction is performed for a specific purpose. The distinction between the transcendental reduction and eidetic reduction is significant, whereas the ...
Faunadestia's user avatar
1 vote
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What are “intentionality”, “presence” and “taking as” with regards to Heidegger?

The OP quotes Husserlian intentionality (a consciousness of objects) will have been replaced by the concept of care or Being-in-the-world (a non-intentional, or perhaps pre-intentional, openness to a ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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1 vote

What are some refutations of Husserl’s anti-psychologism?

Psychologism is a philosophical position, according to which psychology plays a central role in grounding or explaining some other, non-psychological type of fact or law. John Locke seems an eminent ...
Double Knot's user avatar
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1 vote

What are the "Acts" Discussed in Husserl's "Logical Investigations"?

All types of consciousness are intentional according to Husserl's phenomenology, in the sense that they aim toward or intend about something beyond themselves (non-closureness). These object-directed ...
Double Knot's user avatar
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1 vote
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Sartre's "The transcendence of the ego"

The 'I think' There is a version of the "Cogito" ['I think, therefore I exist': GT] that Kant is found endorsing, but not in the manner intended by Descartes. At B132 [of the Critique of Pure ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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1 vote

From Sartre's Being and Nothingness, what is the difference between reflective consciousness and self-reflective consciousness?

Sartre's work in ontology, which is an attempt to categorize Being and Nothing adequately, claims that being is transphenomenal or irreducible and is distinct from phenomenal objects creating a ...
J D's user avatar
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