8 votes

Can I know something but not be able to justify it to anyone else?

Yes. And this is true of most of what we know. Almost everything we know, we learn thru first person empiricism. It may be possible to translate and detail at least some first person empirical ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

Intersubjective agreement isn't required at all, strictly speaking. But it does help. For one particular topic, if we grant that some reasonable portion of humans are rational, it suggests that those ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
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4 votes

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

There should always be some room for skepticism, even in the face of high intersubjective agreement. For example, there are many common optical illusions, which most people mis-interpret (even if you ...
Barmar's user avatar
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4 votes

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's subjective experiences? There's no convention by which one can answer this question across all societies....
J D's user avatar
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4 votes

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

I just watched a Star Trek episode in which someone says "I know this, trust me". The captain immediately swings into action, because he knows the person and trusts their judgement. In the ...
Meanach's user avatar
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4 votes

Can I know something but not be able to justify it to anyone else?

The skeptic view (in the sense of questioning beliefs, not radical philosophical skepticism) is, roughly speaking, that if you cannot justify something, you shouldn't believe it. The above means being ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
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3 votes

Can I know something but not be able to justify it to anyone else?

The examples @Dcleve gives in his answers for knowing "from pure first person thinking" seem to me examples for the experience of inner certainty. In most cases there is no problem to ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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2 votes

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

Trust or distrust is a subjective experience. It arises both in the presence and in the absence of intersubjective agreement. Justification efforts sometimes arise alongside the trust or distrust in ...
SystemTheory's user avatar
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1 vote

Do descriptions of what exist map to causes recognized by Man? Can we describe coherent models for broad patterns of knowledge?

Your suggested tabular map of fundamental categories of cause doesn't seem to map to your headline question about knowledge in any obvious way, but that could be my inability to make sense of your ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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1 vote

Do descriptions of what exist map to causes recognized by Man? Can we describe coherent models for broad patterns of knowledge?

Your question is probing the problem that under physicalism, neither psyche nor morality are causal. This leads to the denial of free will by most physicalists, and also two ways to conclude that ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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1 vote

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

This is an extremely straightforward application of Bayes' theorem. Suppose we give prior values to: The probability P(H) that person A has an hallucination (using what we know about A, or what we ...
Stef's user avatar
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1 vote

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

Strictly speaking, intersubjective agreement is in-and-of-itself a personal subjective experience, and is therefore not entirely trustworthy. In short; intersubjective agreement isn't a foolproof way ...
ConnieMnemonic's user avatar
1 vote

Is physical attractiveness subjective?

So, problems with subjective/objective interpretation are always explained quite readily by the notion of intersubjectivity: Intersubjectivity argues that each thought community shares social ...
J D's user avatar
  • 25k
1 vote

Is physical attractiveness subjective?

Beauty is objective. Us humans, as biological creatures, have survived for gazillions of years on this planet and of course it was not easy for 99% of us. We do not divide into 2 halves like bacteria ...
Dennis Kozevnikoff's user avatar

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