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30 votes

Testing Free Will

is it possible for such agents to determine whether or not they possess free will? A precondition for answering this question is that the term "free will" is sufficiently well defined. IMHO,...
Math Keeps Me Busy's user avatar
20 votes
Accepted

How could one distinguish crankery from serious work?

How do I know which of the two it could be? Look for somebody who does understand it. People who come up with novel thoughts often (but not always) find it difficult to describe those thoughts in ...
wizzwizz4's user avatar
  • 2,184
15 votes

How could one distinguish crankery from serious work?

The obvious answer is that you have to make a serious effort to understand the matter from first principles. For mathematics, that would mean reading all of the definitions of all of the individual ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 2,247
12 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

Ethical and moral beliefs are justified but they are non scientific. Aesthetic beliefs , metaphysical beliefs , epistemological beliefs , religious beliefs , intuitive beliefs , cultural and social ...
SacrificialEquation's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Is belief in abiogenesis justified under evidentialism and process reliabilism?

The wikipedia article cited in the question clearly states: The prevailing scientific hypothesis is ... Meaning currently, science makes only weak claims about this being the current hypothesis, as ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,956
8 votes

Is belief in abiogenesis justified under evidentialism and process reliabilism?

Abiogenesis literally just means "life arising from non-life." The term does not inherently place any restrictions on how this process played out, how quickly it happened, or at what time it ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 2,247
7 votes

Can I know something but not be able to justify it to anyone else?

Yes. And this is true of most of what we know. Almost everything we know, we learn thru first person empiricism. It may be possible to translate and detail at least some first person empirical ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 14.6k
7 votes

Are there non-scientific ways to have a justified belief in levitation?

This might be one of the easiest supernatural claims to demonstrate (if it were possible), because pretty much all you need to do is confirm that (1) someone is in the air, (2) they aren't attached to ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 10.9k
6 votes
Accepted

What does "true" mean in "justified true belief"?

This is slightly tricky as not everyone uttering that may have the same conception of truth, but generally speaking I think the definition only makes sense for some external/correspondence notion of ...
got trolled too much this week's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Are we only justified in holding beliefs that are supported by evidence susceptible to peer review, leading to substantial intersubjective consensus?

If I read your question literally, the answer is straightforwardly no. You can be justified in holding beliefs about a vast range of events only you have experienced. I can believe that I got out of ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 24.5k
6 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

There are no universally acceptable criteria for justifying our beliefs. If there had been, we would all agree on which beliefs are justified. In principle, though, everybody would probably agree that ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
  • 8,353
5 votes
Accepted

Defending the Unpopular: Foundationalism

To expand slightly on what Conifold mentioned, according to IEP the "modest foundationalism" has Alvin Platinga as a prime exponent; Wikipedia mostly covers that under "reformed ...
got trolled too much this week's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

If A is justified in believing in X based on their personal experience, can B also be justified in believing in X based on A's testimony?

Only if one treats A's testimony about X as credible and reliable. If A is not credible (e.g. they're an embellisher or liar), then what they say about X will not have much weight as to the truth of X....
Lowri's user avatar
  • 1,140
5 votes

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

Assertion: I probably ought not leave the Mona Lisa in the middle of a busy road. This is a claim I have never subjected to direct experiment. Indeed, it is a hypothesis I never intend to test. Even ...
Josiah's user avatar
  • 1,920
4 votes

"Dinosaurs did exist once". Is it knowledge or is it only justified belief?

I think it is important to make a distinction — with the caveat that few people make this distinction, to everyone's detriment — between the politics of knowledge and the pragmatics of knowledge. ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 21.3k
4 votes

Testing Free Will

This is actually a question about philosophy of science. I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the criteria of falsifiability. Simply put, for a hypothesis to even be suitable to be proven or disproven ...
Mike Qtips's user avatar
4 votes

What does "true" mean in "justified true belief"?

It might be easier to think about this in terms of the meaning of the word ‘know’. In that case, the ‘true’ part of JTB amounts to the following claim: If S knows that p, then p For example, if I ...
E...'s user avatar
  • 6,566
4 votes
Accepted

What would constitute as justification?

The word justification has an extended family of epistemological uses. In no particular order of generality (and not exhaustively), see: Artemov and Fitting, "Justification Logic." Hasan ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

Intersubjective agreement isn't required at all, strictly speaking. But it does help. For one particular topic, if we grant that some reasonable portion of humans are rational, it suggests that those ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 10.9k
4 votes
Accepted

Can private experiences justify private belief in supernaturalism?

It is important to discriminate between certainty and knowledge. Certainty is a subjective feeling, which can be highly convincing for oneself. Knowledge requires the ability to give supporting ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 34.5k
4 votes

Is belief in abiogenesis justified under evidentialism and process reliabilism?

It's not belief in abiogenesis.. because there is no detailed candidate explanation to "believe"...(YET). Abiogenesis is the name we use to describe the event that we cannot yet describe in ...
Alistair Riddoch's user avatar
4 votes

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

It's not necessarily inconsistent to have beliefs justified by different methods. It's part of the human condition that life sometimes requires to make decisions based on beliefs which cannot be based ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,956
4 votes

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

Is it consistent? It depends... One would need to address consistency on a method-by-method basis. But if we're talking about the general principle: If one uses the scientific method for some S but ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 10.9k
4 votes
Accepted

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

You begin your question with the term 'epistemological self-consistency'. I believe that such a term simply reduces to rationality, thus we can re-write, particularly paraphrasing the latter half of ...
J D's user avatar
  • 29.1k
4 votes

Is it ever rational or justified to believe in a claim X based on eyewitness accounts if X seems to contradict mainstream scientific theories?

You seem to be asking for a black and white answer to a very vague question. Of course, it depends. When an anomalous variation in the expected orbit of Mercury was first observed by a single ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 24.5k
3 votes

Testing Free Will

Although I believe we have free will, it is actually impossible to ever prove it via any test whatsoever, because you cannot prove that the test results are meaningful at all. In particular, you ...
user21820's user avatar
  • 836
3 votes

Is this a case of JTB that may be true, but not knowledge?

Note that we know this well enough that entire industries depend upon it, and they are considered safe. RSA Public Key Cryptography is an international standard that backs SSL and other internet ...
hide_in_plain_sight's user avatar
3 votes

Testing Free Will

I don't really think it can ever be tested. Personally what convinces me there is no free will is the large amount of evidence that the chemistry of the brain determines our moods, even our ...
armand's user avatar
  • 6,973

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