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12 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

Ethical and moral beliefs are justified but they are non scientific. Aesthetic beliefs , metaphysical beliefs , epistemological beliefs , religious beliefs , intuitive beliefs , cultural and social ...
SacrificialEquation's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Is belief in abiogenesis justified under evidentialism and process reliabilism?

The wikipedia article cited in the question clearly states: The prevailing scientific hypothesis is ... Meaning currently, science makes only weak claims about this being the current hypothesis, as ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,956
8 votes

Is belief in abiogenesis justified under evidentialism and process reliabilism?

Abiogenesis literally just means "life arising from non-life." The term does not inherently place any restrictions on how this process played out, how quickly it happened, or at what time it ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 2,247
7 votes

Can I know something but not be able to justify it to anyone else?

Yes. And this is true of most of what we know. Almost everything we know, we learn thru first person empiricism. It may be possible to translate and detail at least some first person empirical ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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7 votes

Are there non-scientific ways to have a justified belief in levitation?

This might be one of the easiest supernatural claims to demonstrate (if it were possible), because pretty much all you need to do is confirm that (1) someone is in the air, (2) they aren't attached to ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

Are we only justified in holding beliefs that are supported by evidence susceptible to peer review, leading to substantial intersubjective consensus?

If I read your question literally, the answer is straightforwardly no. You can be justified in holding beliefs about a vast range of events only you have experienced. I can believe that I got out of ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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6 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

There are no universally acceptable criteria for justifying our beliefs. If there had been, we would all agree on which beliefs are justified. In principle, though, everybody would probably agree that ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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5 votes
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If A is justified in believing in X based on their personal experience, can B also be justified in believing in X based on A's testimony?

Only if one treats A's testimony about X as credible and reliable. If A is not credible (e.g. they're an embellisher or liar), then what they say about X will not have much weight as to the truth of X....
Lowri's user avatar
  • 1,140
5 votes

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

Assertion: I probably ought not leave the Mona Lisa in the middle of a busy road. This is a claim I have never subjected to direct experiment. Indeed, it is a hypothesis I never intend to test. Even ...
Josiah's user avatar
  • 1,920
4 votes
Accepted

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

Intersubjective agreement isn't required at all, strictly speaking. But it does help. For one particular topic, if we grant that some reasonable portion of humans are rational, it suggests that those ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 10.9k
4 votes
Accepted

Can private experiences justify private belief in supernaturalism?

It is important to discriminate between certainty and knowledge. Certainty is a subjective feeling, which can be highly convincing for oneself. Knowledge requires the ability to give supporting ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 34.4k
4 votes

Is belief in abiogenesis justified under evidentialism and process reliabilism?

It's not belief in abiogenesis.. because there is no detailed candidate explanation to "believe"...(YET). Abiogenesis is the name we use to describe the event that we cannot yet describe in ...
Alistair Riddoch's user avatar
4 votes

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

It's not necessarily inconsistent to have beliefs justified by different methods. It's part of the human condition that life sometimes requires to make decisions based on beliefs which cannot be based ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,956
4 votes

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

Is it consistent? It depends... One would need to address consistency on a method-by-method basis. But if we're talking about the general principle: If one uses the scientific method for some S but ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 10.9k
4 votes
Accepted

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

You begin your question with the term 'epistemological self-consistency'. I believe that such a term simply reduces to rationality, thus we can re-write, particularly paraphrasing the latter half of ...
J D's user avatar
  • 29.1k
4 votes

Is it ever rational or justified to believe in a claim X based on eyewitness accounts if X seems to contradict mainstream scientific theories?

You seem to be asking for a black and white answer to a very vague question. Of course, it depends. When an anomalous variation in the expected orbit of Mercury was first observed by a single ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 24.5k
3 votes

Are we only justified in holding beliefs that are supported by evidence susceptible to peer review, leading to substantial intersubjective consensus?

a somewhat silly example: imagine your parent(s) is no longer alive, neither are your mutual acquaintances, there are no pictures, letters, videos, etc., concerning your relationship; are you ...
ac15's user avatar
  • 1,761
3 votes

Are we only justified in holding beliefs that are supported by evidence susceptible to peer review, leading to substantial intersubjective consensus?

one historically notable example being the resurrection of Jesus, which was purportedly witnessed by multiple observers, with intersubjective agreement among all of them Bible is correct because it's ...
Groovy's user avatar
  • 2,040
3 votes

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

There should always be some room for skepticism, even in the face of high intersubjective agreement. For example, there are many common optical illusions, which most people mis-interpret (even if you ...
Barmar's user avatar
  • 1,860
3 votes

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's subjective experiences? There's no convention by which one can answer this question across all societies....
J D's user avatar
  • 29.1k
3 votes

To what extent is intersubjective agreement required for one to be justified in trusting one's own subjective experiences?

I just watched a Star Trek episode in which someone says "I know this, trust me". The captain immediately swings into action, because he knows the person and trusts their judgement. In the ...
Meanach's user avatar
  • 2,341
3 votes

Can I know something but not be able to justify it to anyone else?

The skeptic view (in the sense of questioning beliefs, not radical philosophical skepticism) is, roughly speaking, that if you cannot justify something, you shouldn't believe it. The above means being ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 10.9k
3 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

There is no easy or simple answer to that question, possibly the question needs more focus to be answerable. The area of philosophy dealing with this is called Epistemology. It provides significant ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,956
3 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

Can I be justified in believing in a proposition X through a justification that doesn't meet the standards of the scientific method? This is dependent on your notion of justification, though given a ...
Max Maxman's user avatar
3 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

Justification through science is about reliability. There isn't a categorical difference between science and non-scientific sensory experiences. For the purposes of this question, science can broadly ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 10.9k
3 votes
Accepted

Under physicalism, should I still be sad if my murdered wife is replaced with a perfect clone?

No, under physicalism there is no rational justification for that. However, humans may feel differently, and no need to invoke any killing. Just consider catching the winning home run baseball of some ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,956
3 votes

Is it ever rational or justified to believe in a claim X based on eyewitness accounts if X seems to contradict mainstream scientific theories?

In general, an accepted scientific theory does not only confirm an observation but also presents an explanation of the phenomenon. If contradicting observations have been confirmed by reliable ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 34.4k
2 votes

Can God make the belief in His own existence justified (if He exists)?

Nothing is preventing God from revealing to you in person if you are eligible. Just like this site doesn’t tolerate every kind of question and every kind of person for a good reason , similarly God ...
Dheeraj Verma's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible