New answers tagged

1

Hume was deeply skeptical of metaphysics. For a non-philosopher this includes topics such as being, essence, substance, space, time, the self, and causation. For example: in A Treatise of Human Nature Hume argues that we have no innate concept of Cause and Effect (C\E) and that C\E is not rationally known but instead we develop the concept of it through ...


0

We can speak of "mathematical or geometrical knowledge" because most of our knowledge is not about objects but about abstractions (classes of objects): I have the knowledge that to the object "my left hand" belongs a set of other objects that we call "finger". We map that to the mathematical concept of "set", we are able to define the cardinality of sets (...


2

Perhaps the major difference is that Hume derives from experience whatever categories he uses - or supposes that he does so. To take causation as a star example: Hume derives the category of causation from experience in the following way. When event A is prior to event B (priority); when A and B are close in space and time (contiguity); and when A-type ...


0

The answer to "Is this [as you described it] a rough idea of what is going on [with Kantiam metaphysics] is an unequivocal: Yes. Though your characterization "From here, he uses a sort of Descartes "I think therefore I am" to these forms of intuition" is ambiguous -- but if if what you mean is this and only this instantiates thought as we homo sapiens know ...


Top 50 recent answers are included