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In his written works, Kant did not write about such human beings e.g. unborn humans or humans left braindead after accidents. However he wrote about animals (meaning non-rational biological agents). For animals he wrote that there is no duty to treat them as ends, but that unnecessary cruelty to animals would still make us worse. A theoretical case of a non ...


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Rather than morality, let's talk on the meta-level. Let's talk about moral arguments. Sometimes, people hear moral arguments and decide they agree. This can cause them to change their moral values. For example, a moral argument may show how a person's current values are inconsistent with themselves. The person may want to have consistent values, so they ...


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Your example is correct, but you didn't considered it to the last consequences. If someone steals, finally, people work for nothing, they might not afford a house, eating, and at the end, perhaps, surviving. So, we don't steal in order to allow our human group to survive and persist along time. Morals, ethics, religions or formal law are just forms of ...


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Kantian ethics is fundamentally grounded in rationality and freedom, and to understand it one needs to think about category of the synthetic a priori that he develops. Kant views ethical claims, which are grounded in the moral law, as cases of the synthetic a priori. This means that they tell us about the world, but are not grounded in experience. (...


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