6

I think your professor has misled you deeply or ironically. But Kaufmann is probably no better of a source either about Kierkegaard. For Kierkegaard, you should be a Christian, and it is absurd in certain senses, but it is not we could say "metaphysically" absurd. Instead, it's that it will appear as absurd for someone who has not taken the leap, and it ...


6

It is simply an analogy, in the context of the discussion regarding Søren Kierkegaard's quest for the knight of faith : People commonly travel around the world to see rivers and mountains, new stars, [...]. This does not interest me. But if I knew where there was such a knight of faith, I would make a pilgrimage to him on foot, for this prodigy interests ...


5

I haven't read Richard Schmitt which makes me hesitant to answer the question as to what he means, but I can address the quote and what Kierkegaard means. First, the idea is not singular to Kierkegaard. It, in fact, traces back to Aristotle. For Aristotle, we are animals -- but we are animals who join to being animals some form of rationality. Being ...


5

There's three answers in the literature with respect to this question. First, there are certain postmodern readers (I'm thinking of a Derrida text but could be mistaken) who take the pseudonyms very seriously and think there's no author behind them (since they accept the death of the author as a matter of semiotics and structuralism). The thing they like is ...


5

Warning: Not a Kierkegaard expert. Here's a commentary of the passage you quoted: If Kierkegaard is correct, rather than being ourselves, we tend to conform to an image or idea associated with being a certain type of person. That's what Kierkegaard means by belonging to an "abstraction" (an image or idea) created by "reflection" (self conscious thinking)...


5

You can probably jump in, but don't get discouraged if you get lost and confused. Kierkegaard's writing is very confusing most of the time. But as you keep reading you can find points which he makes incredibly lucid, all nestled within often confusing larger works. Either/Or I probably wouldn't recommend as a first reading, but you've already read the ...


5

The passage is a bit difficult to follow and if memory serves there's quite a bit of literature out there trying to figure out exactly what the distinction between a knight of faith and knight of infinite resignation is. For de Silentio (who also claims to not understand faith), the crucial distinction is that the knight of infinite resignation gets to be a ...


4

The definition you're getting from your dictionary reflects one contemporary usage of the word subjectivity. But the word has had many meanings. The most basic meaning is "that which inheres in a subject". A long time ago (scholastic medieval period), this would mean following Aristotle, that which is true of a substance in itself -- without being ...


4

I read this as a comment on what Sartre would later describe as bad faith. Kierkegaard is seemingly having a wonderful time at the party, but he is like an actor playing a role. He is untrue to his real self. The essential emptiness of the experience leads him to a place of despair. The fact that no one seemed to notice the deception just makes it worse -...


3

Kierkegaard is not using "faith" to mean belief in God, but rather trust in God. From Kierkegaard's point of view, the big question is not whether or not you believe God exists, but whether or not you are willing to have absolute trust in God --and God's ability to transcend the limits of what you can personally conceive as possible. For Kierkegaard ...


3

I don't know much about Kierkegaard, but this summary from Wikipedia seems to explain the issue you're running into: The leap of faith is his conception of how an individual would believe in God or how a person would act in love. Faith is not a decision based on evidence that, say, certain beliefs about God are true or a certain person is worthy of love. ...


3

As the comments indicate, this diary entry was private, and not meant to convey any message, except perhaps a reminder to its author. It is however characteristic of some central themes in Kierkegaard's philosophy (and life). Namely, coming face to face with your own existence, and its meaning or meaninglessness, through crisis and the contemplation of death....


3

There is a footnote in Postscript which is very useful here: "There is no excluding dialectics. It may be that a generation, perhaps two, can live in the belief of having found a barricade that is the end of the world and of dialectics. That doesn’t help. Thus, for a long time it was thought possible to exclude dialectics from faith by saying that it was ...


3

It can be difficult and misleading to try to comprehend Kierkegaard line by line. Like Lao Tzu, he's a philosopher of paradox, and you gain an apprehension of the grand sweep of his ideas by considering his series of oppositions in context, not by focusing in on the individual details. With that said, the paradox or opposition here is that man is and is ...


3

They're actually similar in a lot of ways. For a defense of similarities see Stewart Kierkegaard's Relation to Hegel Reconsidered (https://www.amazon.com/Kierkegaards-Relations-Reconsidered-European-Philosophy/dp/0521039517). For more of the opposite, read Thulstrup's Kierkegaard's relation to Hegel. Maybe to boil it down quite a bit, It's not clear how ...


3

Repetition is a key concept for Kierkegaard, and he often uses it to depict a (generally vain) attempt to recapture an previous experience, typically one of aesthetic transcendence. As far as I know, Kierkegaard uses "remember" just in an ordinary sense, it's something you used to know that you can call back to mind, and he does superficially seem to use "...


3

See at least: Alastair Hannay, Kierkegaard: A Biography (2003), page 46: He [Søren] entered the university in October with the good grades in all his entry examinations expected of a pupil from the School of Civic Virtue, and with distinction (laud prae ceteris) in Greek, history, French, and – to his fellow-pupils’ great surprise – Danish composition. ...


3

Kierkegaard wrote 'The Diary of a Seducer' but nowhere are his views on sexuality, virginity, chastity fully stated or worked out in fine detail. ▻ SEX AND SIN Kierkegaard does not regard sex as sinful, so he would not regard virginity as a way of avoiding sin. His own formula is that sex and sin came into the world together. ('Concept of Anxiety', 1844, ...


2

This is intended primarily as a supplement to Michael Dorfman's excellent, primary-sourced answer Similar to Plato, who rarely if ever wrote in his own voice, Kierkegaard had a philosophy deeply opposed to didacticism, and was endeavoring to convey concepts that were often paradoxical, or that couldn't be expressed directly. Therefore, just as in Plato's ...


2

The recent book Kierkegaard: A Single Life sheds some more light on his usage of pseudonyms. Their usage seemed to be common in the day - as a means to distance oneself from what could be rough edges. Even Bishop Mynster had a pseudonym named "Kts", made with the middle letters of his name (JaKob PeTer MynSter). Copenhagen was a small place - it was a way ...


2

There is a correspondence between the 'direct' and the 'indirect' works. There tends to be at least one 'direct' work per 'indirect' work, that takes up the same questions and themes as the 'indirect' work and was published at nearly the same time. The parallels between the two bodies of work are very important, and you're missing a great deal if you read ...


2

For Kierkegaard, and by extension Christian existentialists in general, it is precisely the primacy of the personal relationship with God that releases the individual from all other bindings of religion, law, custom, morals and tradition (while at the same time laying on the existential "yoke" of absolute direct obedience to God). Although this clearly ...


2

'Reflection' in Kierkegaard is opposed to 'immediacy'. It's the state in which you form an idea about something and deal with the idea, as opposed to dealing with the thing itself. For instance, The Present Age starts with: The present age is one of understanding, of reflection, devoid of passion, an age which flies into enthusiasm for a moment only to ...


2

"subjected by reflection" I think means that the state of belonging in all things to an abstraction is caused by reflection (theoretical thinking). I don't think there's any philosophical import there... just the usual sense of the word "subjected". On "reflection", I got the sense in Kierkegaard that the concept is simple, but it's hard to discern because ...


2

My copy of the Concept of Anxiety is 7000 miles away, but I can answer more generall on this point. The basic idea is not original to Kierkegaard nor is his use of it singular to that particular text. Kierkegaard was especially fond of Diogenes the Cynic's response to one of Zeno's paradoxes.See here for more on the original case. For Kierkegaard, the ...


2

The last sentence gives a clue as to why "man is not yet a self." Since a synthesis is a relation between two (my emphasis) factors, and since "the self is a relation which relates itself to its own self," is only one factor, - man is not yet a self! However, I think this is the wrong conclusion. It should be - man is not yet a synthesis! From the first ...


2

In the case that belief in God (specifically the Christian God) could decisively be demonstrated to be irrational (via some combination of logic and evidence), would this commit Kierkegaard's Knight of Faith to embrace irrationality? I think the answer to this question is going to be that you're going to have to do a lot of work to explain what you mean by "...


2

I think the judgment of the headline much outweighs the evidence of the quote, which is most naturally read as a satire on the tourist mentality. Kierkegaard is making fun of those who scour the globe in search of "exotic" entertainment, without ever gaining much of value from it. While it's quite possible he's talking about other races with the phrase "...


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