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Reference is to On Certainty. The context is about "justification" of our knowledge: justification cannot go on forever, in search for an absolute ground. It must stop somewhere (compare with The Problem of Induction, and OC, 135). See: 105. All testing, all confirmation and disconfirmation of a hypothesis takes place already within a system. And this ...


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A full answer to your question would be very difficult here but there is a reasonably straightfoward account in the Ethics of how one type of 'adequate knowledge' is possible. This account is not dogmatic in my view. Three grades of knowledge The three grades of knowledge are readiy set out. There is knowledge: From signs; as for example when we ...


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Even if the premise is true, humans don't necessarily do whatever maximises their personal bliss. Insofar as philosophy comments on this, the question is what construal of our ethical responsibilities we try to live by, when we can bring ourselves to do so. Doing what serves our personal bliss sounds closer to egoism than any other theory of ethics - a 1-...


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To expand on Conifold's well-informed answer - some knowledge is painful. The poem points out the ironic fact that not knowing ones fate allows one to live a better life. Examples include knowing what people really think about you, knowing why and when a relationship will end or when you will die. In cases like these, it's often better (smarter) not to ...


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I have a different opinion. The maxim ignorance is bliss can be used in a sarcastic vein, but it's actually very truthful. Your question overlaps philosophy and psychology. Look up "cognitive dissonance," for example. Do doctors and government always tell people the truth? Of course not. Politicians often lie for sleazy reasons, but there are situations ...


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Err... The phrase 'ignorance is bliss' is sarcastic. 'Ignorance is bliss' in the sense that one actually believes that the ravenous bug-blatter beast of traal will not eat us if we put a towel over our heads. The phrase is invariably used as a way of chiding someone for being willfully, stupidly, or naïvely ignorant of the way the world actually works, such ...


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