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19 votes

Does the success of AI (Large Language Models) support Wittgenstein's position that "meaning is use"?

No. Wittgenstein would probably be the first to argue that the bare existence of a functioning Large Language Model does not by itself have any philosophical importance. The construction of an LLM is ...
transitionsynthesis's user avatar
16 votes

Is there a name for the argumentative tactic where you play dumb and ask for extreme simplification?

The closest I could find is : Sealioning: A subtle form of trolling involving “bad-faith” questions. You disingenuously frame your conversation as a sincere request to be enlightened, placing the ...
Idiosyncratic Soul's user avatar
13 votes

Is there a name for the argumentative tactic where you play dumb and ask for extreme simplification?

In rhetoric, argumentation requires a certain level of good will and willingness to participate honestly in the communication process. If you are on a debate stage and your opponent fakes a heart ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
10 votes

Is there a name for the argumentative tactic where you play dumb and ask for extreme simplification?

Feigned ignorance is more or less what you're describing. Nearby are Appeal to ridicule I've seen this used dishonestly but effectively in job interviews Strawman can generally be assumed to lurk ...
Rushi's user avatar
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8 votes

Wittgenstein and tautology

Strictly speaking, one may, of course, say of the standard metre rod that it is one metre long. But Wittgenstein's point is that this is quite a different statement from saying that my dog's tail is ...
Bumble's user avatar
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8 votes

Can location be assigned to an entity, given a lack of length, depth, or width?

David Gudeman rightly points out that your entity is called a point. A point by definition has no extension. How that is possible is that Euclidean space is concerned with having dimensions that are ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
5 votes
Accepted

Does the success of AI (Large Language Models) support Wittgenstein's position that "meaning is use"?

Yes, indeed: According to the post-Tractatus Wittgenstein, words are "meaning families"; the specific "meaning" of a word is determined by (or perhaps is) its use in context. ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is it possible for words to have a meaning other than how they are used?

Meanings of words are attributed to them by humans. One consequence is that you can never be sure whether the meaning of a word intended by the person who utters or writes it is the same as the ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.8k
4 votes

Wittgenstein and tautology

There is one thing of which one can state neither that it is 1 metre long, nor that it is not 1 metre long, and that is the standard metre in Paris. Wittgenstein is referring to the international ...
causative's user avatar
  • 13k
4 votes

Can location be assigned to an entity, given a lack of length, depth, or width?

Judging by your response to JD's excellent answer, what you seem to be asking is whether it makes any sense to talk about an unreal object having a location. I think the answer is generally no, it ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.8k
4 votes

Does the success of AI (Large Language Models) support Wittgenstein's position that "meaning is use"?

No. As @transitionsynthesis says, LLMs do not come in contact with Wittgenstein and so can't support or refute him. Meaning (and Wittgenstein's "use") requires intention, which LLMs do not ...
uhClem's user avatar
  • 59
4 votes

Does the success of AI (Large Language Models) support Wittgenstein's position that "meaning is use"?

From SEP Wittgenstein 3.3 Meaning as Use: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/wittgenstein/#MeanUse Ascertainment of the use (of a word, of a proposition), however, is not given to any sort of ...
Idiosyncratic Soul's user avatar
3 votes

Is there a name for the argumentative tactic where you play dumb and ask for extreme simplification?

It depends on the questioner's intent. If the questioner's intent is either to genuinely help educate the person or to evaluate the other person's education with a good faith reason for doing so, then ...
TimothyAWiseman's user avatar
3 votes

Factual and linguistic propositions

Perhaps some other examples might make the distinction clearer. If I say (Sentence 1) 'Armenians begins with an upper case A and has nine characters' I am talking about the word 'Armenians'. If I say (...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.8k
2 votes
Accepted

Going against the limits of language

You may be looking for section 119 of Philosophical Investigations:- The results of philosophy are the discovery of some piece of plain nonsense and the bumps that the understanding has got by ...
Ludwig V's user avatar
  • 2,757
2 votes

Factual and linguistic propositions

At the opening of the book, Ayer says: The principle of verification is supposed to furnish a criterion by which it can be determined whether or not a sentence is literally meaningful. A simple way ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
2 votes

Wittgenstein's chess example

Clearly, he thinks we can learn the rules of chess without knowing the names of the pieces while learning the game, be able to ask relevantly, “What is this called?” a that is, this chess piece. We ...
user66697's user avatar
  • 892
2 votes

Is the failure of substitutivity in an intensional context simply due to a lack of clarity in terms of the identity operator?

No. The identity operator indicates that two names or definite descriptions refer to the same object; it does not directly say anything about properties, intrinsic or extrinsic, although from A=B one ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
2 votes

How do Philosophy students deal with archaic and old English in Philosophy books?

Philosophy is an endeavor that ranges across time and space, and as you have noted language. On the downside, using complex or more archaic English can be bothersome for the student of philosophy. ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
2 votes

Does the success of AI (Large Language Models) support Wittgenstein's position that "meaning is use"?

No Outside from the philosophy perspective which has been touched on by other answers, from a machine learning perspective, the meaning of words in a transformer is only partially defined by their use....
LivesayEngineer's user avatar
2 votes

Does the success of AI (Large Language Models) support Wittgenstein's position that "meaning is use"?

When I read LLM, I am using language, and often (if not always) it is meaningful to me. Though this may be his position, I wouldn't say this supports Wittgenstein's claim, as it seems too general to ...
user66697's user avatar
  • 892
1 vote

Does the success of AI (Large Language Models) support Wittgenstein's position that "meaning is use"?

The quote is from "Ludwig Wittgenstein: Philosophical Investigations, Section 43". I simply take Wittgenstein's statement as exactly what is says: It gives an operational definition of the ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 32k
1 vote

Wittgenstein's chess example

We may say: it only makes sense for someone to ask what something is called if he already knows how to make use of the name. This appears to be the main point of Wittgenstein's passage, and it is ...
causative's user avatar
  • 13k
1 vote

Exploring Methods for Articulating the Ineffable Nature of Emotions: Philosophical Insights Needed

Looking at this from another perspective (after the suggested approach from Huxley, this answer aims at sketching Heidegger view on the question) and in some kind of frame-challenge way, we could ask: ...
Johan's user avatar
  • 440
1 vote

Does position imply existence?

In The Basic Problems of Phenomenology, page 92, Heidegger writes: If we compare it with the Kantian thesis, the Thomistic thesis says—indeed, in agreement with Kant—that existence, there-being, ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
  • 5,889
1 vote

On the linguistics of math affected by freewill?

If we take intuitionism as the paradigmatic example of a philosophy of mathematics in which free will plays a constructive role, via the free choice sequences unfolded by Freely Creating Mathematical ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
1 vote

Is it possible for words to have a meaning other than how they are used?

Every word at some point had to acquire its current meanings. But the question is which came first? Did meaning come first and then we apply a word to it so we can refer to the meaning. Or did we just ...
Annika's user avatar
  • 1,653
1 vote

Can location be assigned to an entity, given a lack of length, depth, or width?

In a three-dimensional world, location is defined as a point that is represented by 3 numbers; one for each dimension; ex. height, depth, and width. So, if an entity does not have height, depth, and ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
1 vote

How do we describe the objects or systems like an "organic meal"?

I looked at WP's article on properties and the SEP's article on properties and either without any luck. In the IEP's article on properties we seem to come close with 'indiscriminantly necessary ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
1 vote
Accepted

Does natural language like English make more assumption about logic than mathematics?

Languages, natural like English or French, or subject to specification like the mathematical language or formal logic itself, do not make any assumption, and this for the obvious reason that ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
  • 7,724

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